Towering inferno

Everlasting Life

Through Faith in Jesus
London fire: Grenfell Tower cladding 'linked to other fires'
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-40283980
The cladding installed on Grenfell Tower was also used on other buildings that have been hit by fires around the world, the BBC has learned.

The exterior cladding, added in 2015, had a polyethylene - or plastic - core instead of an even more fireproof alternative, BBC Newsnight understands.

High-rise buildings in France, the UAE and Australia that had similar cladding have all been hit by fires that spread.

Rydon, which completed the renovations, said the work met all fire regulations.


[...] Residents in Grenfell Tower say they were told as recently as last weekend that they should remain in their flats in the event of a fire.

Mr Wrack added: "If during the course of renovations, fire resistant walls, doors, ceilings have been compromised, then clearly the whole basis on which that advice has been based falls apart.

"This should not be happening, that's the horrible aspect of this incident."

Both before and during the refurbishment, the local Grenfell Action Group claimed that the block constituted a fire risk.

Residents also warned that site access for emergency vehicles was "severely restricted".
 

Everlasting Life

Through Faith in Jesus
There's a lot of anger starting to come out, the media are imo helping it along, going to take a long time for this to subside and hopefully the truth to be told but don't hold your breath.
Yeah...I had a feeling that after the shock would come the anger and given the supposed 'fireproofing', understandable so. This could have an exceptionally charged response, though. There is a culture mixed in the UK that seems to be pretty angry and violent as we've seen in the last year for completely no aggravated 'reason'. I hope this doesn't fuel more 'reason' for violence.

:pray ing for the comfort of many families and that many would come to know Jesus Christ as their Savior.
 

Kallah

Well-Known Member
Yeah...I had a feeling that after the shock would come the anger and given the supposed 'fireproofing', understandable so. This could have an exceptionally charged response, though. There is a culture mixed in the UK that seems to be pretty angry and violent as we've seen in the last year for completely no aggravated 'reason'. I hope this doesn't fuel more 'reason' for violence.

:pray ing for the comfort of many families and that many would come to know Jesus Christ as their Savior.
They are protesting right now before the local authority main building, Kenningston and Chelsea Town Hall.
 

Kallah

Well-Known Member
Right now they have stormed the building. Some have covered their faces. Some are smiling. So far it is not escalating to violence. It's madness!!!!!!reminds me of Black Lives Matter.
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
Yeah...I had a feeling that after the shock would come the anger and given the supposed 'fireproofing', understandable so. This could have an exceptionally charged response, though. There is a culture mixed in the UK that seems to be pretty angry and violent as we've seen in the last year for completely no aggravated 'reason'. I hope this doesn't fuel more 'reason' for violence.

:pray ing for the comfort of many families and that many would come to know Jesus Christ as their Savior.
Amen, the field is ripe for harvesting.
 

Simon of Syrene

Well-Known Member
The BBC have made this political by attacking Theresa May for the failures that are the responsibility of the muslim mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, and the Labour led Kingston and Chelsea Borough Council.
In all truth the blame falls on successive governments and while not a supporter of Sadiq Khan it's very telling when we as Christians point out and say "the Muslim mayor" of London. Boris Johnson was mayor when the renovations were started and I don't see any referral to him as the Christian Mayor of London.
As a Christian I thought prayer and not blame should be our response.
Those that died mostly because the firebrigade told people to stay in their houses as the fire rose through the floors.
Sorry for the response I thought the queen showed more empathy than all politicians.
Unfortunately the block of flats was among the most affluent of places in U.K. and the response was dire for one of the wealthiest places in the world. The tragedy raises so many questions about how society at times overlooks the poor who live amongst us and maybe we only see them as they clean our offices or serve us food in restaurants.
That's my two pence of thought, sorry just that a lot has been happening the world over it breaks my heart.
 

Kallah

Well-Known Member
In all truth the blame falls on successive governments and while not a supporter of Sadiq Khan it's very telling when we as Christians point out and say "the Muslim mayor" of London. Boris Johnson was mayor when the renovations were started and I don't see any referral to him as the Christian Mayor of London.
As a Christian I thought prayer and not blame should be our response.
Those that died mostly because the firebrigade told people to stay in their houses as the fire rose through the floors.
Sorry for the response I thought the queen showed more empathy than all politicians.
Unfortunately the block of flats was among the most affluent of places in U.K. and the response was dire for one of the wealthiest places in the world. The tragedy raises so many questions about how society at times overlooks the poor who live amongst us and maybe we only see them as they clean our offices or serve us food in restaurants.
That's my two pence of thought, sorry just that a lot has been happening the world over it breaks my heart.
What I see is Theresa May being made the scapegoat by the BBC.
 

Everlasting Life

Through Faith in Jesus
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...s-close-tears-meets-grenfell-tower-residents/

[Video and pictures are included in article showing how the Queen and her son came directly to be a comforting presence for the people in grief]

The Queen appeared close to tears as she visited a rest centre helping those affected by the Grenfell Tower fire.

She and the Duke of Cambridge met volunteers, local residents and community representatives at Westway Sports Centre, close to the charred remains of the building in west London.

Her Majesty looked teary-eyed as she was shown around after being greeted by the Lord Lieutenant of Greater London, Ken Olisa, with the shell of the tower block visible in the distance behind them.

The Queen, dressed in blue, stopped to speak to local residents who had gathered outside, looking visibly upset.

She and Prince William met volunteers who have coordinated the effort at the centre, in front of tables stacked with donated goods.

William commented to one volunteer, who spoke about the fire: "Things like that you never want to see."

The Duke told another volunteer: "That's one of the most terrible things I have ever seen."

A strong campaigner on mental health, William said it was important that those affected talked about the trauma they had witnessed.

Loubna Aghzafi, 42, a local resident, told William that many people she had spoken to were not yet able to share their experiences.

He replied: "They may want to eventually. They must talk about it."


The Queen heard how the community had rallied in the wake of the fire and praised those who had come together, adding their response had "come over very strongly".

Harrowing cries could be heard inside the main hall of the rest centre, where evacuated families and locals have been gathering, as a group of residents consoled one another.

A short distance away, the Queen and Duke of Cambridge met helpers from the Red Cross and its chief executive Mike Adamson.

The Queen and William signed a book of condolence in front of a wall plastered with missing posters describing those feared lost in the fire..............
 

Andrew

Well known member
In all truth the blame falls on successive governments and while not a supporter of Sadiq Khan it's very telling when we as Christians point out and say "the Muslim mayor" of London. Boris Johnson was mayor when the renovations were started and I don't see any referral to him as the Christian Mayor of London.
As a Christian I thought prayer and not blame should be our response.
Those that died mostly because the firebrigade told people to stay in their houses as the fire rose through the floors.
Sorry for the response I thought the queen showed more empathy than all politicians.
Unfortunately the block of flats was among the most affluent of places in U.K. and the response was dire for one of the wealthiest places in the world. The tragedy raises so many questions about how society at times overlooks the poor who live amongst us and maybe we only see them as they clean our offices or serve us food in restaurants.
That's my two pence of thought, sorry just that a lot has been happening the world over it breaks my heart.
The responsibility for dealing with the emergency falls, legally, not on central government but on local government. Right now it doesn't matter who was in charge when it was carried out - that is a question for later. For now, the local authorities need to step up to the plate. In my previous employment I was part of the team who would respond to such an emergency, so I am speaking from a position of knowledge.
 

Kallah

Well-Known Member
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/201...s-close-tears-meets-grenfell-tower-residents/

[Video and pictures are included in article showing how the Queen and her son came directly to be a comforting presence for the people in grief]

The Queen appeared close to tears as she visited a rest centre helping those affected by the Grenfell Tower fire.

She and the Duke of Cambridge met volunteers, local residents and community representatives at Westway Sports Centre, close to the charred remains of the building in west London.

Her Majesty looked teary-eyed as she was shown around after being greeted by the Lord Lieutenant of Greater London, Ken Olisa, with the shell of the tower block visible in the distance behind them.

The Queen, dressed in blue, stopped to speak to local residents who had gathered outside, looking visibly upset.

She and Prince William met volunteers who have coordinated the effort at the centre, in front of tables stacked with donated goods.

William commented to one volunteer, who spoke about the fire: "Things like that you never want to see."

The Duke told another volunteer: "That's one of the most terrible things I have ever seen."

A strong campaigner on mental health, William said it was important that those affected talked about the trauma they had witnessed.

Loubna Aghzafi, 42, a local resident, told William that many people she had spoken to were not yet able to share their experiences.

He replied: "They may want to eventually. They must talk about it."


The Queen heard how the community had rallied in the wake of the fire and praised those who had come together, adding their response had "come over very strongly".

Harrowing cries could be heard inside the main hall of the rest centre, where evacuated families and locals have been gathering, as a group of residents consoled one another.

A short distance away, the Queen and Duke of Cambridge met helpers from the Red Cross and its chief executive Mike Adamson.

The Queen and William signed a book of condolence in front of a wall plastered with missing posters describing those feared lost in the fire..............

It's their job! That's what royals do. But that does nothing to help those in need. The UK government is not the same as the US government. In the US the mayor of the city and the elected board members would have the responsibility of sorting the matter. In the UK the local councils have that job. Would we expect President Trump to solve this crisis in a few days? No, we would not. There are many tasks at hand that cannot be solved overnight. People are responding emotionally. It is complicating the resolutions. Right now, everyone needs to take a deep breath. Yes, the survivors and residents have real needs. But how it plays out depends on working together reasonably with the authorities.
 

Simon of Syrene

Well-Known Member
The responsibility for dealing with the emergency falls, legally, not on central government but on local government. Right now it doesn't matter who was in charge when it was carried out - that is a question for later. For now, the local authorities need to step up to the plate. In my previous employment I was part of the team who would respond to such an emergency, so I am speaking from a position of knowledge.
I do understand but my concern has been about scapegoating.
This has been collective failure and my concern was blaming the "Muslim mayor".
Unfortunately it appears nobody in the whole of London is stepping up the plate and take control. What is needed was someone co-ordinating the beareaved, homeless and injured. As late as ten minutes ago there were relatives still not being told who is in hospital who is missing so that's where people start scapegoating
 

Andrew

Well known member
I do understand but my concern has been about scapegoating.
This has been collective failure and my concern was blaming the "Muslim mayor".
Unfortunately it appears nobody in the whole of London is stepping up the plate and take control. What is needed was someone co-ordinating the beareaved, homeless and injured. As late as ten minutes ago there were relatives still not being told who is in hospital who is missing so that's where people start scapegoating
And the responsibility for coordinating that response lies squarely with the local authorities. I am in complete agreement that scapegoating is not the answer.
 

Kallah

Well-Known Member
I do understand but my concern has been about scapegoating.
This has been collective failure and my concern was blaming the "Muslim mayor".
Unfortunately it appears nobody in the whole of London is stepping up the plate and take control. What is needed was someone co-ordinating the beareaved, homeless and injured. As late as ten minutes ago there were relatives still not being told who is in hospital who is missing so that's where people start scapegoating
The whole thing is a mess. The local authority needs to get to work. Hopefully, they will have been working on it. But they need to address these victims and families soon.
 
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