Tomato Plants

Cloud Watcher

Well-Known Member
At the beginning of spring I bought a cherry tomato plant. It wasn't more than 18 inches tall at the time. After a couple months a few baby tomatoes started to appear. It took a long time for them to get big and ripe enough to eat. In the meantime, the plant seemed to become envious of Jack's beanstalk and began to grow like crazy. Instead of putting energy into actually producing tomatoes, the plant seems focused on getting BIGGER. Would it help to prune it or should I just wait it out. I was so looking forward to having tomatoes to eat.
 

Forgiven1

Watching and waiting
At the beginning of spring I bought a cherry tomato plant. It wasn't more than 18 inches tall at the time. After a couple months a few baby tomatoes started to appear. It took a long time for them to get big and ripe enough to eat. In the meantime, the plant seemed to become envious of Jack's beanstalk and began to grow like crazy. Instead of putting energy into actually producing tomatoes, the plant seems focused on getting BIGGER. Would it help to prune it or should I just wait it out. I was so looking forward to having tomatoes to eat.
Tomato plants will produce more tomatoes if you clip the "suckers" off. They are the shoots that grow where the stem and branches meet. Hope that makes sense.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Stop fertilizing the plant. You want it to put its energy into producing tomatoes, not growing more plant. Once pretty much any vegetable plant has any vegetables on it, no more fertilizer. Some fruit and veggie plants, once flowers appear, no more fertilizer.
Keep the plant watered IAW instructions for the variety, soil conditions, and the weather in your area.

Some varieties of cherry tomatoes will grow and ripen tomatoes over time instead of all at once. Even after teeny tiny green tomatoes appeared on our plant, new flowers appeared, and later more teensy-weensy green tomatoes appeared. This happened over a period of about a month. Now, we've been harvesting as the tomatoes get ripe and there are still small green ones and in-between sized/ripeness ones on the plant :dance2
 

ChildofLight

Well-Known Member
I agree- don’t fertilize. Beware cause once cherry tomatoes start making, you’ll have more than you can handle. You can save the seed from the overripe ones by smearing on newspaper to dry. Plant the seeds come spring or start in pots. Those are very hardy. I have them coming up in my compost bin cause I throw the rotten ones in there. Sometimes they even come back up where they were the year before.:rolleyes:
I like the Porter tomato as they are hardy and have a slightly larger tomato with quite not as many on the vine. Also, they don’t have near the acid the cherries do.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
I agree- don’t fertilize. Beware cause once cherry tomatoes start making, you’ll have more than you can handle. You can save the seed from the overripe ones by smearing on newspaper to dry. Plant the seeds come spring or start in pots. Those are very hardy. I have them coming up in my compost bin cause I throw the rotten ones in there. Sometimes they even come back up where they were the year before.:rolleyes:
I like the Porter tomato as they are hardy and have a slightly larger tomato with quite not as many on the vine. Also, they don’t have near the acid the cherries do.

Just picked 3 for Dad's salad tonight :dance2
The tomatoes are ripening at about the right pace to pick the day of or the day before use :smile Have to pick a day or so earlier than I'd like because of the :squirrelbait

Still a bunch of green and a few in-betweens on the plant :dance2
 
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