Today (March 25, 2021) Pope Francis Has Committed Utter Blasphemy

Christophilus

Active Member
Today, (March 25, 2021) Pope Francis "tweeted": "Mary is not only the bridge joining us to God; she is more. She is the road God traveled to reach us and the road we must travel in order to reach him."

Does anyone at the Vatican read the Bible anymore? “For there is one God, and there is one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus,” (1 Timothy 2:5).
Amen. I was raised a Catholic, but before I was saved I left the church for, among other reasons, Marionism (also for papal infallibility, veneration of saints, mediation of priests). I read the Bible cover to cover, and these doctrines were out of place in Christian faith. I know there are Catholics who are true believers and are a part of the Bride, but that is in spite of the false doctrine.
 

Mama Bug

Well-Known Member
Since I've never been inside a Catholic Church, what happens at a Mass? How is a Catholic service (or Mormon or JW or anything else really) different from a standard Protestant service. Is there a preacher, some message? Singing? What goes on there? And why is it called a Mass? Just curious.
From what I remember, it was mostly rituals. Singing of course. The priest would say something, the congregation would answer back. There was communion, everyone drank from the same cup. (Germs anyone?) I don't remember any kind of preaching, just rituals. I used to go to Mass with my mom, then church with my dad. He was Assembly of God. The two churches were and are as different as night and day. What I remembered about Jesus and the Bible as an adult when I came to the Lord I learned from my dad. Even though I got saved two years after his death, I credit him with leading me to the Lord.

My grandmother was given a Catholic funeral. It was pretty strange to me. The priest threw holy water all over the place. I'm not sure why it's called Mass.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
From what I remember, it was mostly rituals. Singing of course. The priest would say something, the congregation would answer back. There was communion, everyone drank from the same cup. (Germs anyone?) I don't remember any kind of preaching, just rituals. I used to go to Mass with my mom, then church with my dad. He was Assembly of God. The two churches were and are as different as night and day. What I remembered about Jesus and the Bible as an adult when I came to the Lord I learned from my dad. Even though I got saved two years after his death, I credit him with leading me to the Lord.

My grandmother was given a Catholic funeral. It was pretty strange to me. The priest threw holy water all over the place. I'm not sure why it's called Mass.

EDITED TO ADD quoted post from RonJonSilver
Since I've never been inside a Catholic Church, what happens at a Mass? How is a Catholic service (or Mormon or JW or anything else really) different from a standard Protestant service. Is there a preacher, some message? Singing? What goes on there? And why is it called a Mass? Just curious.

The word mass comes from the Latin word for "dismissed" ("sent"). Dismissal of the church to go into the world with The Gospel was at the end of the traditional service. Catholic services used to be in Latin instead of the common language of the people. Orthodox Mass was in the language of the people.

Not all Catholic churches use common cup anymore, and some give a choice. Common cup during Holy Communion is practiced by some Protestant churches, although it's far less prevalent in modern times because of germs and people's discomfort with the practice. If common cup is offered in Protestant church, there's a choice of individual cup. Since wuhan virus, many Protestant congregations aren't even serving Holy Communion using the little individual washable cups at the rail; rather using individual prepacked bread and wine/grape juice kits in the pews (or remotely if no in-person service)

I have no idea about the holy water during the funeral.


What is a "standard Protestant service?"

Anymore, there's liturgical and non-liturgical services. Modern and traditional music. Hymnals and no hymnals. Dancing or no dancing. Raising and waving of hands or no raising and waving of hands. Some churches have more congregational singing participation than others. Some are pretty much praise only. Some chant and some don't. Some are reading of the Bible only plus a sermon. Some are more *entertaining* than others. Some clergy wear formal robes/vestments and others don't. Etc., etc., etc.

A liturgical service is formal and has a specific order of what is done when. Traditional Protestant liturgical services are similar to traditional Catholic and Orthodox liturgical services, but without prayers to the saints, adoration of icons/images, Hail Marys, worship of the saints, Mary, and the Pope, etc., etc., etc. Not all Protestant congregations still have liturgical services, although some provide a choice of traditional liturgical and modern/informal services, and some only have modern/informal services. Traditional liturgical services are based on serving Holy Communion using bread and wine following Christ's command to "do this in remembrance of me" and using His words regarding the bread as His body and the wine as His blood as the words of institution. The rest of the liturgy is based on the Jewish Passover Siddur, Seder, Jewish synagogue/Temple services, including singing hymns and Psalms, chanting, playing instruments, and reading Scripture. Most liturgies are very similar, as the "finalized form" occurred early in Church history, although changes have been made by various denominations and congregations (usually removing things).

The traditional Lutheran service at the church I attended starting Confirmation age (Jr. High) on consisted of:

Prelude (organ before service)
Processional Hymn (sung by congregation and choir as Pastor(s) and choir process into the sanctuary)
Invocation (in the name of The Father and of The Son and of The Holy Ghost; congregation responds "Amen")
Confession and absolution/announcement of grace
Introit
Gloria Patria
Kyrie
Gloria in Excelsis
Salutation
Collect of the Day
Old Testament lesson
Sung Psalm or hymn version of a Psalm
Epistle lesson
Gradual
Alleluia/Hallelujah
Gospel lesson (passage announced, congregation response of Glory be to Thee O God, passage read, congregation response of Praise to Thee O Christ)
Creed (Apostles' or Nicene)
Hymn
Sermon
Choir Offertory
Offering and Offertory
Hymn
Prayer of the Church
Preface (to Holy Communion)
Sanctus
Prayer of Thanksgiving
Words of Institution
Lord's Prayer
Angnus Dei
The Communion (hymns sung by congregation while others are Communing at the rail)
Nunc Dimitis
Post-Communion Prayer
Benediction
Triple Amen
Postlude (organ after service; becomes the Prelude when services are back-to-back)

*If no Holy Communion, after the Prayer of the Church, the service ended with the Lord's Prayer, Benediction, and Triple Amen.
** Sometimes there was one more or one less hymn
*** Notice no Peace of The Lord shaking hands (germs :eek

Services were 45 minutes, so there was no dragging feet through the music. The organist kept things moving along. 4 services on the hour each Sunday, and the sanctuary could hold 2000, so there were both ushers and parking lot/traffic guys to make sure everyone got out and in. Children's Sunday School during the service. People could stay for fellowship or various Bible studies. It was the other church I attended as a younger child that had the awesome children's church . . .

Lots of singing in church. Except for confession, prayers, and the creed, the congregation sang everything, and people sang in parts (not just the choir). Even with the doors closed, the service could be heard outside a good distance :biggrin Corporate confession and prayer, as well as silent individual confession and prayer :smile

Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod (LCMS) information about parts of the liturgy (somewhat modernized/trimmed from years ago)
https://www.lcms.org/worship/liturgy-parts

Brief explanations of the various parts of the liturgy
http://atlanta.clclutheran.org/bibleclass/liturgystudy.html

Notes on the Liturgy
https://steadfastlutherans.org/notes-on-the-liturgy/
:choir


:pray :pray :amen :amen
 
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Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
I have never known any Catholics personally, but how is it that they, as a supposed denomination of Christianity (in fact the “original one”) lost the plot so completely on the whole “Mary issue?

Was raised Catholic and have no idea about why.

It would take an entire semester of Church history (both Western and Eastern), theology, and ecumenical council classes to adequately answer this one question :frown
 
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Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
It was from catholiccourier.com - and, someone has posted it here now.

I'm not in agreement at all with what was said there. I know that catholics revere Mary way too much and it is against what scripture teaches.
What gets me now-a-days is that you can read blurbs from a given source and the words are twisted to the point that you get two completely distorted
versions of what was said. Then, you have to determine which one is true - or if neither are true. We can no longer trust what anyone says - or supposedly
says. Because of that, I am resting fully on what God says in His Word ....... and, that alone. (Which has always been the best thing to do, anyway.)

This is why I am very leery of online Bibles. Far, far too easy for someone to get in there and mess around :eek
Anymore, one must also be careful of Bibles printed in China - the Chinese Communist Party has stated it is going to change/changing Bibles :mad

As the evil in this world progresses, having a trustworthy hard copy of the Bible will be more and more important :tappingfoot

Get your unadulterated Bibles (and hymnals, etc.) now, while you still can :tappingfoot


:pray :pray :amen :amen
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
I come from a catholic family, and am in fact a ‘confirmed’ one at 8 years old. How can an 8yr old make such a decision?!

I came to saving faith at the age of 3. There are other members here, who also came to saving faith at very young ages.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Since I've never been inside a Catholic Church, what happens at a Mass? How is a Catholic service (or Mormon or JW or anything else really) different from a standard Protestant service. Is there a preacher, some message? Singing? What goes on there? And why is it called a Mass? Just curious.

No idea about non Judeo-Christian religions because I refuse to go inside their satanic houses of worship (except when I was required to do so in the performance of LE duties, but don't have to worry about that anymore).

Catholic liturgical services much like Orthodox and Protestant liturgical services. More detail in my other post.
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
I'm assuming she is blissfully unaware of what is happening on earth just like every other saint/believer in heaven. God is merciful and I really hope and trust she has been protected from seeing her name so awfully besmirched.
Well said. And, by the way, my opinion has nothing to do with gender. If, as a man, I sired the savior of mankind, and GOD INCARNATE, I would honestly be incapable of saying much of anything (how the heck did Mary cope with that). '

But I would have tremendous love for my son (as most parents do), but then, to factor in the graft of exactly what happened, God making use of my body to produce the Messiah, I would consider it a huge insult to worship me. I am not God. If between Jesus and me, you are concentrating on me, then you need new glasses.

Final note: Mary deserves respect and appreciation in spades. God chose her.

And.. I'm done.
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
I came to saving faith at the age of 3. There are other members here, who also came to saving faith at very young ages.
GI.. wow. As is only natural I've talked with a number of people who tell me they have no memories before they we six or seven or so. Not everyone, of course, but a lot. I distinctly remember a number of memories for when i was three. My biological dad/father died when I turned four, so I am certain my memories were not figments of my imagination because they usually involved him and my mother generally backed up my memories. I say "generally" simply because a lot of my memories with my dad did not include her.

Anyways, being able to remember your living experience at 3 years old is very uncommon. Not sure that those memories and the fact you can recollect them is worth much, but is nice to know that I am not the only one.
 
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Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
GI.. wow. As is only natural I've talked with a number of people who tell me they have no memories before they we six or seven or so. Not everyone, of course, but a lot. I distinctly remember a number of memories for when i was three. My biological dad/father died when I turned four, so I am certain my memories were not figments of my imagination because they usually involved him and my mother generally backed up my memories. I say "generally" simply because a lot of my memories with my dad did not include her.

Anyways, being able to remember your living experience at 3 years old is very uncommon. Not sure that those memories and the fact you can recollect them is worth much, but is nice to know that I am not the only one.

The memory of getting saved in Molly's Sunday School class is as clear as if it had happened last week and is very precious to me :smile
So to me at least, this early memory is worth much :smile

Other early memories of things like Sputnik, Soyuz, Mercury, Cuban Missile Crisis, Cold War, Kennedy assassination, etc., not so important, but they and other experiences/memories helped shape who I am :smile
 
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Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Funny *coincidence,* reference this thread

BibleGateway Verse of the day

For there is one God, and one mediator between God and men, the man Christ Jesus; Who gave himself a ransom for all, to be testified in due time.
1 Timothy 2:5-6 KJV


:pray :pray :amen :amen
 

JoyJoyJoy

I Shall Not Be Moved
I have been to Catholic funerals. Plenty of incense, singing of Ava Maria, communion, some scripture, folks crossing themselves, praying Our Father...

I didn't care for the Ava Maria part. At the Catholic wake, they say a whole rosary of that Hail Mary. We do not sit in the room while that is going on.
 

Xenosjeff

Well-Known Member
I'm an X.

A Catholic who knows their catechism will not disagree with what the Bible says about Jesus being the only way. It just means something different when they are through mentally digesting that fact. They will have to overlay the extra-biblical formula over it. When they add it all up they're not even aware that they have taken their faith from Jesus alone and placed it in a false formula.
Human minds are not always aware of the tricks played by this type of shell game. All their lives they're told that an apple is an orange because it just is. They've lost the ability to discern truth. The average catholic will be shocked to find that They've been bowing down to an orange.

Jeff
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
From what I remember, it was mostly rituals. Singing of course. The priest would say something, the congregation would answer back. There was communion, everyone drank from the same cup. (Germs anyone?) I don't remember any kind of preaching, just rituals. I used to go to Mass with my mom, then church with my dad. He was Assembly of God. The two churches were and are as different as night and day. What I remembered about Jesus and the Bible as an adult when I came to the Lord I learned from my dad. Even though I got saved two years after his death, I credit him with leading me to the Lord.

My grandmother was given a Catholic funeral. It was pretty strange to me. The priest threw holy water all over the place. I'm not sure why it's called Mass.
Throwing Holy Water at a funeral was a new one for me, so I read a few internet sites and this is an overview:
It blesses those in Purgatory - their is a bond between the living and the dead and the dead need relief from the continual fires that torment them. It's a reminder to the living of their continual need. Sort of like Holy Water christening a baby blesses his soul. Womb to tomb mumbo jumbo.
I now return you to the world of reality.
 
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