Titanic Pastor's Last Cry: 'Unsaved to the Lifeboats'

LivnForChrist

Jesus Christ is Lord
Tuesday, April 17, 2012

When the Titanic struck an iceberg, Harper put his 6-year-old daughter in a lifeboat but refused to get in himself, even though he was her only living parent.

He then went among the passengers telling them about Jesus Christ. When one man refused the offer of salvation, Harper offered him his own life jacket.

"You need this more than I do," he said.

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SonSeeker

Well-Known Member
In the original movie, there was one scene of Pastor Harper trying to save souls. Too bad he didn't get in to the remake. I guess he didn't fit in with Jack and Rose.:tsk:
 

SteveJM

Well-Known Member
In the original movie, there was one scene of Pastor Harper trying to save souls. Too bad he didn't get in to the remake. I guess he didn't fit in with Jack and Rose.:tsk:
There were so many inspiring and dramatic true stories from the Titanic, its too bad James Cameron didn't understand that or care. In my opinion the movie would have been much better if Cameron would have stuck with the real stories.
 

mattfivefour

Administrator
Staff member
Film-makers would rather tell their stories rather than the real ones. If you have seen the movie Battle Hymn starring Rock Hudson as the WW2 and Korean War fighter hero, Dean Hess, you will recall that Hess was portrayed as a guilt-ridden man who was "on the wagon", implying he used to be a drunk. The fact is that the real Dean Hess, a born again Christian from his youth and a minister in the Church of Christ both before and after the war, was a man who never drank, smoked, or cussed and who was happily married to a woman and the two of them raised three good sons. Even the film's misrepresentation of Pastor Hess that I just described was a victory of sorts for Brother Hess because originally the director had insisted on portraying him as a drunk, foul-mouthed, womanizer who was ridden with guilt over what he was doing! :doh:

BTW, Colonel Hess used the money from the film and from his written autobiography, also titled Battle Hymn to buy land on the outskirts of Seoul and build a large orphanage for the war orphans of Korea. As i write this, he is still alive— he turned 94 last December.
 

SteveJM

Well-Known Member
Film-makers would rather tell their stories rather than the real ones. If you have seen the movie Battle Hymn starring Rock Hudson as the WW2 and Korean War fighter hero, Dean Hess, you will recall that Hess was portrayed as a guilt-ridden man who was "on the wagon", implying he used to be a drunk. The fact is that the real Dean Hess, a born again Christian from his youth and a minister in the Church of Christ both before and after the war, was a man who never drank, smoked, or cussed and who was happily married to a woman and the two of them raised three good sons. Even the film's misrepresentation of Pastor Hess that I just described was a victory of sorts for Brother Hess because originally the director had insisted on portraying him as a drunk, foul-mouthed, womanizer who was ridden with guilt over what he was doing! :doh:

BTW, Colonel Hess used the money from the film and from his written autobiography, also titled Battle Hymn to buy land on the outskirts of Seoul and build a large orphanage for the war orphans of Korea. As i write this, he is still alive— he turned 94 last December.
Thanks for the story. I'll have to see if I can find Battle Hymn for a viewing. Hollywood film-makers with their big egos and affection for vice. :tsk:
 
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