thrift clothes shopping!

Channah

Well-Known Member
Who loves thrift clothes shopping I do!!! Including when you don't really know what your looking for and BOOM you find some awesome treasures. Let's talk about the awesome clothes we found when shopping at thrift stores!.
I do! Sometimes I find great bargains.
 

Leigh

Well-Known Member
I'm not crazy about thrift stores although for years I did shop them occasionally and usually could find some great clothes bargains. In recent years, however, I never seem to find anything but junk. I'm wondering if people search the racks and buy up all the good things to resell?
 

Leigh

Well-Known Member
Oh, and there are YT channels that show how to find an *average* item at a thrift store...maybe something a little older, or too large, then re-work it into something beautiful. That's always fun to do if you have the time. I'd probably bring something home, set it aside, and never get back to it. Then end up donating! :p
 

Andiamo

"Let's go!"
I found a gorgeous tunic length, crinkle blouse with lace trim from White House Black Market at Goodwill the other day. Must have gotten missed by the clothes pickers/resellers. Thing is though everything gets just slightly ruined there because they (necessary, I'm sure) wash everything in hot? water. So this blouse doesn't look quite as crisp and nice as it could. But hey I'm wearing it to church anyway.
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
I buy a lot of skirts. For some reason they have a lot of beautiful and unique like-new skirts. My mom and I love to tally up an outfit. She wore one last month that was gorgeous and cost a total of $2 including the shoes, lol. Normally it’s a little more, but this was stuff off the 50-cent rack. We get a big kick out of it. We are going thrifting tomorrow.
 

JoyJoyJoy

I Shall Not Be Moved
I love thrift shopping and often find good quality, name brand items. I haven't been in a while..I like to go in cool weather.

Some of the prettiest stuff in my house was bought at yard sales/thrift shops....rugs, do-dads, pictures, dishes, even comforters.

I think it's so funny now...there's an ad on TV for a high end resale shop...they say it's helping the planet. I guess they are trying to take the stigma away from wearing used clothes. But there's a whole bunch of us that never cared that they were used in the first place.
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
I once found a sweater I LOVED at a thrift store. As I was looking it over I found what I thought was a small splash of vomit on it. I tried every way to convince myself to buy it—vomit comes out in the wash, it was probably baby vomit, maybe it wasn’t vomit, etc., but I just couldn’t do it.
 

Reason & Hope

Well-Known Member
When I ran a musical theatre program, I went to thrift stores constantly. It really helps with the budget, plus one finds more interesting items. Because she would help me that, my daughter really got into thrift store shopping starting in middle school. She loves clothes! And she has style, not liking to wear what everyone else is wearing. She had amassed a large wardrobe at a fraction of the cost of new clothes.

I get some clothes at thrift stores too. I have purchased a few items, like a nice silk blouse, that still had original store tags. Never worn! We have found that different thrift stores are better for clothes than others.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
Some stores, some areas are better than others.

I've found that most people in larger sizes like me (I'm a 16-18 and 5 foot 8, size 10 feet) -- there isn't as much, and it's more worn out because it's harder to find large size clothes in good quality. Designer brands are usually small sizes, and the smaller sizes are more easy to find. Especially in shoes. So it kind of depends on what size you are looking to find, and how much in donations that the particular store is getting in, in that area. Donations tend to happen when people gain weight, not so much as they lose.

It pays to know what you are looking for and ignore the other stuff. I use black, navy, grey and white to off white as my core for my wardrobe, and a specific set of accent colours that I like. I scan for those and ignore the rest.

It's how I get thru a regular retail store fast, go to the back where the sale racks are, and scan fast for the colours in the size range I take.

Take several sizes into the change room at once, because sizes are different between brands and sometimes between styles inside a brand.

Same for thrift stores. They are often mislabelled for sizing because people often cut that label out and it's guesswork on the volunteer processing the clothes. So even if it's on the wrong size rack, take it in to try if your thrift store has fitting rooms. Most don't so I wear close fitting pants and top so I can try on top.

That said, look online. My sister once pointed out that baby clothes, and maternity clothes (and other baby necessities) are great in upper middle class neighbourhoods. She would look at the address area for garage sales, and ads in the free paper (now there are online versions) that were selling baby clothes.

Go to garage sales and scan quickly for what you need. I did get size 10 shoes once, a perfect pair of black leather classic pumps in an elegant heel, pointy toe and all. An answer to prayer. If you are on a tight budget, ask God to show you where the bargains are that you need.

One time, the seller was getting rid of some baby furniture and maternity clothes that my sister was after, and threw in a huge garbage bag of baby clothes for free. My sister took it gladly, and actually made a little money putting some of the things into a resale shop, the ones that she didn't need for her baby at that time.

People often get rid of things like kid's clothes or maternity wear in one big lot. You can buy the lot, and sell individual stuff in resale or consignment stores or online. Thus making back some of your investment in a large lot.

Another point she made was that the double income 1 to 2 kids kind of neighbourhoods generally bought more stuff, and better quality but used the furniture like high chairs, baby bouncers etc less, because the kids were at day care. Consequently those things rarely saw more than one child and if they were used with 2, they were very gently used. She got near new cribs, high chairs and car seats that way.

In areas where times are tougher, clothes get passed down a lot more, and baby furniture the same. My sister purposefully stalked thrift stores that operated in higher income areas for the same reason.

It all depends what you are looking for.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
I found a gorgeous tunic length, crinkle blouse with lace trim from White House Black Market at Goodwill the other day. Must have gotten missed by the clothes pickers/resellers. Thing is though everything gets just slightly ruined there because they (necessary, I'm sure) wash everything in hot? water. So this blouse doesn't look quite as crisp and nice as it could. But hey I'm wearing it to church anyway.
I guess the plus side is that it's pre shrunk. I didn't realize that they'd be doing that now, but it makes sense. A bit hard on the wooly sweaters.
 

Andiamo

"Let's go!"
Go to garage sales
Garage sales here in Florida are like opening a cage of starved hyenas in a meat shop. It's because of all the reselling people are doing now. Very ambitious ones will actually show up and ring your doorbell the day before, if you dare put out the sign. And in the morning, cars are waiting on the street before you even open your garage door. They run up and start grabbing things as you put them out in the driveway. It's insane. It gradually calms down after all the good stuff is taken, and by noon people simply crane their necks and look as they drive by.
 
In my college days of the late '70s, I bought a sport coat at a thrift store as I was working part time as a programmer in the university hospital and all the men wore jacket and tie to work. It got lost in the move when I left college.

Spin forward to when I was age 57 and needed some work. I ended up loading and unloading trailers for Fedex Ground at their New England hub...50 doors for unloading +150 for loading with conveyor belts all over the place. One of the things they don't tell you up front is you'll work up far more sweat than you expect (no A/C and little heat in the winter) and that sometimes you'll damage your clothing on a package or item. My last 18 months there were in the damaged package repair where broken/crushed/loose on the floor or rolling around in the conveyor system items would come to be all put back in the box (if everything there and undamaged) or, we'd fill out a form and send it back to the shipper who would collect from Fedex. During that time, I manged to get gooey stuff, strange chemical powders and liquids, and sometimes soft-now-cement-hard-an-hour-later stuff on pants, tee-shirts, and even my work boots. Even liquid skunk scent! (hunters use it) As I also had to customize new boxes to replace damaged boxes, I carried a carpenters' knife with me and managed to slash several pairs of pants over my right pocket where my keys and handkerchief are. In the summer months, I'd take 3 extra tees with me and if it was extra hot at night (I worked 3rd shift), an extra pair of pants, too. They'd get soaked with sweat with 30-90 minutes work. I think I drank a gallon of water each night as well.

Needless to say, it was Salvation Army to the rescue for my work clothes. In 2005-2008, mens' tees were $1.00, sweat shirts were $3.00, and jeans were $5-7. I preferred everything with no advertising or artwork on them. Just plain tees and sweatshirts. When I left there for an outdoor job at CSX railroad, the used clothing became my work gear their until they started getting too raggedy or damaged beyond safe use. Being retired for 6+ years now, I still have some of the old tees and sometimes buy more at Salvation Army to keep my 'stock' levels of 15-20 tees that's my summer wear as well as
 

Nemophilist

Well-Known Member
Garage sales here in Florida are like opening a cage of starved hyenas in a meat shop. It's because of all the reselling people are doing now. Very ambitious ones will actually show up and ring your doorbell the day before, if you dare put out the sign. And in the morning, cars are waiting on the street before you even open your garage door. They run up and start grabbing things as you put them out in the driveway. It's insane. It gradually calms down after all the good stuff is taken, and by noon people simply crane their necks and look as they drive by.
My friend has a couple of yard sales a year. She said you wouldn't believe how many will ring your doorbell the day before the sale or very early morning the day of the sale. She learned not to even go to the door :laugh
 

RobinB

Well-Known Member
hat said, look online. My sister once pointed out that baby clothes, and maternity clothes (and other baby necessities) are great in upper middle class neighbourhoods. She would look at the address area for garage sales, and ads in the free paper (now there are online versions) that were selling baby clothes.

Not sure if this was mentioned but websites like Poshmark are a good option. My coworker has a little "shop" on there and has sold quite a few barely used items== for a fraction of what she originally paid. :nod
 
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