This Rapture Resistance

Chris

Administrator
Staff member
This Rapture Resistance
By Terry James

Saturdays are no longer my favorites like they were when I worked full time in my jobs in advertising and public relations. Back then, I welcomed the relaxation that came with the day immediately following hectic weeks of meetings with clients and concocting and conducting campaigns for corporations to get products and services in front of the public.

Nowadays, Saturdays bore me, because I like to start my days early by listening to TV programs while sipping coffee. The programs are mostly preacher boys (as they’re sometimes called here in the south) such as Dr. David Jeremiah, Dr. Robert Jeffress, Les Feldick, and others who present daily programs. These regularly scheduled programs aren’t on my satellite system on Saturdays. My routine is disrupted.

However, a past Saturday, I was pleasantly surprised while clicking through the channels when I heard a program that was presenting a documentary that piqued my interest. It was on Daystar Television, and it featured of a number of men and a couple of women talking about how true Bible prophecy is a dwindling topic in most all churches in America.

I suspected who a couple of the men were, but never knew for sure, because, of course, I’m now blind. I started watching somewhere in the middle of the documentary, so didn’t have a frame of reference for those speaking in brief clips.

I did think I recognized my dear friend Jan Markell — she will have to let me know — but she was the only one who sounded familiar.

Those who addressed the matters involved were true Bible teachers, to be sure. They outlined precisely how the churches in America today are avoiding talk of prophecy and of Christ’s return. Pastors, they correctly surmised, are most afraid that talk of the Rapture of the Church and of Christ’s return and other prophetic topics will somehow interfere with “growing their churches.”

How sad but true their collective assessments were. The closer the time comes for Jesus to return to earth and correct this horrendous mess Satan and his minions have made of the planet, the less preachers want to preach it, and the more many in the pews prefer not to hear about it.

I thought while listening: How true it is, the forewarning of Jesus Himself when He asked whether He would find faith on the earth when He comes back.

Those being interviewed in the documentary went into depth about how those with the Holy Spirit were the people mentioned in the parable of the ten virgins. How those who have the Holy Spirit within will go into the Marriage Supper of the Lamb. Those without the “oil for their lamps” (the Holy Spirit) won’t be part of that glorious event. They spoke of how there was great resistance not only to talk of the Rapture, but to the belief that the Holy Spirit even, in fact, exists.

It is abundantly clear that those who don’t even believe the Holy Spirit exists lead the way in the “Rapture resistance” that is the title of this commentary. A study looks more deeply into this tragic, downward spiral in Christendom.

Of an estimated 176 million American adults who identify as Christian, just 6% or 15 million of them actually hold a biblical worldview, a new study from Arizona Christian University shows.

The finding was published by the Cultural Research Center of Arizona Christian University in its recently released American Worldview Inventory, an annual survey that evaluates the worldview of the U.S. adult population. Conducted in February, the survey included a nationally representative sample of 2,000 adults.

The study shows, in general, that while a majority of America’s self-identified Christians, including many who identify as evangelical, believe that God is all-powerful, all-knowing and is the Creator of the universe, more than half reject a number of biblical teachings and principles, including the existence of the Holy Spirit.

Strong majorities also errantly believe that all religious faiths are of equal value, people are basically good and that people can use acts of goodness to earn their way into Heaven. The study further showed that majorities don’t believe in moral absolutes; consider feelings, experience, or the input of friends and family as their most trusted sources of moral guidance; and say that having faith matters more than which faith you pursue. (“Most adult U.S. Christians don’t believe Holy Spirit is real: Study,” by Leonardo Blair, Christian Post Reporter, Christian Post, October 1, 2021)


How accurate this polling research is, I don’t know. But certainly all one has to do is to mention the Rapture to most who claim to be Christians and there is either silence or statements like “I don’t like to think about prophecy. It scares me.”

It apparently scares most pastors, too, but for a different reason — the one mentioned earlier.

To eliminate the Holy Spirit is to eliminate the “hope” that is within the “blessed hope” of Titus 2:13.

Jesus told the disciples — and us down through the centuries — that if He went away, He would send the “comforter” — the Holy Spirit. God the Holy Spirit (the Third Person of the Triune Godhead) came at Pentecost (see Acts chapter 2) to indwell and comfort believers until Jesus returns bodily to set up His Millennial Kingdom.

The Holy Spirit is the Restrainer (see 2 Thessalonians chapter 2). He holds back full-blown wickedness at this very moment. The Holy Spirit will remove from that office of Restrainer when we who are true believers are taken instantly to be with Christ.

Here is what Jesus said about that moment. And, despite what a number of seminary professors say, it is a Rapture passage — a mystery that the great Apostle Paul would later reveal in His epistles to the Corinthians and Thessalonians.

“Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also.” – (John 14:1–3)

—Terry

https://www.raptureforums.com/end-times/this-rapture-resistance/
 

Jojo4124

Well-Known Member
"Pastors, they correctly surmised, are most afraid that talk of the Rapture of the Church and of Christ’s return and other prophetic topics will somehow interfere with “growing their churches."

Having been in the ministry, as a children's pastor's wife, I can attest to church leaders and pastors more concerned about numbers of financial contributors than being excited for souls that came to Christ. Let alone excitement for Christ's return.....

Greed. Preaching is taylored so as not to offend the big financial donors. Sin is tolerated so as not to lose that stream of money coming in. Don't offend.

But flocks aren't fed either. What's the point of a church that avoids talking about Jesus's soon return?! The sheep are taught to focus on earthly goods and concerns.

The love of money is the root of all evil. Churches tolerate sin in the church. I've never seen sin in the church dealt with as the Bible says to, humbly evicting an unrepentant person claiming to be a Christ follower in order that they'd see the error of their way and repent. Especially if the congregants living in sin were big financial donors.

So, if the pastor of a church desires a mega church and financial wealth, (most people I met who wanted to be senior pastors desired large congregations and read worldly business plans on how to grow a big church which of course would mean a big salary) they are tempted by greed. Sin in the pastor's heart will affect the flock. Yet these pastors feel special...THEY won't fall into temptation for riches, or adultery for that matter. Rarely have I seen church leaders weep at the alter in repentance of their own sin.

Instead of teaching the sheep to be heavenly minded, pastors themselves desire riches and worldly success and hang out with and give preference to wealthy sheep.

Jesus said you can't serve money AND God...so any pastor who desires riches will be tempted to either serve God or money. And those given over to the desire for money no longer serve God. It's what Jesus said.

Nothing wrong with being wealthy, but the Bible has many warnings and instructions about it. What if Jesus says to any of us, like he did the rich man, go and sell all you have, give it to the poor, and follow Me. While God gives us all things to enjoy, if He asked you or I to sell your most prized possession and give away the money, could you or I obey?

Our hearts are in what we treasure. If we love the world and are attached to the things in it, we don't love God. So many churches are led by greedy pastors. Maybe they don't want to teach prophesy because the Holy Spirit may have given them over to their world-lusting depraved minds. Lukewarm-ness is a choice.

Do not worship pastors! They are people too who are tempted. Pray for them, that they will buy from Jesus ointment for their eyes...so they can see how to Biblically lead the church. And sweet sheep, pastors aren't responsible for our personal relationship with Jesus. Each of us needs to seek the Lord while He may be found.

Pray that Father God will reach the pastors....that as leaders they will seek the Lord, obey Him, turn from our wicked ways...and that churches will become Biblical...on fire! Let Jesus find faith on the earth when He returns! Come, Lord Jesus!!
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Most of our churches do not preach prophecy. Its hard to find church that will even entertain talking about the second coming, much less the rapture or the Tribulation.
We have so many cult and legalistic churches here too.
Really, everyone I hear from america always has something to say about bible prophesy. Here in uk its practically non existant, been a christian for 35 yrs and not a single thing at any time about bible prophecy, not once however have been on the internet and noticed maybe 2 churches have some degree of talk on bible prophecy eg. in crawley heard a series of talks but they were of post trib. and the other in southend, keep meaning to listen to some of the talks but havent got round to them, also have been involved in bible study in my last church in reigate that have touched on them but noticed on the other mens faces a total lack of knowledge or interest. That about sums it all up. When I came on r.f I felt like Elijah when he said I am the only one left, knew I wasnt but sure felt like it, still feel there are maybe a dozen or so people in the entire uk of maybe 70 million, sincerely hope I am wrong and just being negative.
 

Amethyst

Angie ... †
Really, everyone I hear from america always has something to say about bible prophesy. Here in uk its practically non existant, been a christian for 35 yrs and not a single thing at any time about bible prophecy, not once however have been on the internet and noticed maybe 2 churches have some degree of talk on bible prophecy eg. in crawley heard a series of talks but they were of post trib. and the other in southend, keep meaning to listen to some of the talks but havent got round to them, also have been involved in bible study in my last church in reigate that have touched on them but noticed on the other mens faces a total lack of knowledge or interest. That about sums it all up. When I came on r.f I felt like Elijah when he said I am the only one left, knew I wasnt but sure felt like it, still feel there are maybe a dozen or so people in the entire uk of maybe 70 million, sincerely hope I am wrong and just being negative.
People (christian and non-christians) in America have "heard about" bible prophecy but most tend to either be influenced by secular mocking of it from movies, or are satisfied in their ignorance about whether it is true or not. They have no foundation of it.
It is a tremendous blessing when I meet someone who believes anything about literal Tribulation and pre-mill rapture. And I am in conservative region!

I think the health/wealth or prosperity gospel has a stranglehold on much of our country.
 

RobinB

Well-Known Member
People (christian and non-christians) in America have "heard about" bible prophecy but most tend to either be influenced by secular mocking of it from movies, or are satisfied in their ignorance about whether it is true or not. They have no foundation of it.
It is a tremendous blessing when I meet someone who believes anything about literal Tribulation and pre-mill rapture. And I am in conservative region!

I think the health/wealth or prosperity gospel has a stranglehold on much of our country.

Agree.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
People (christian and non-christians) in America have "heard about" bible prophecy but most tend to either be influenced by secular mocking of it from movies, or are satisfied in their ignorance about whether it is true or not. They have no foundation of it.
It is a tremendous blessing when I meet someone who believes anything about literal Tribulation and pre-mill rapture. And I am in conservative region!

I think the health/wealth or prosperity gospel has a stranglehold on much of our country.
Thanks for your input.
 

Flavius Sabinus

Well-Known Member
Last year during the early stages of the "plandemic" my SBC church went through the beginning of an unfortunate split. During the year many church members left, wonderful brothers and sisters in Christ, many of whom had young families. Our children's ministry dropped in numbers substantially and our disheartened children's pastor resigned to go back to his hometown.

I'd say a less than two thirds of the congregation remained, with our Sunday school classes for both adults and children taking a big hit. To make matters even worse there was a big void left in the pastoral staff with most of them leaving. Did I mention that our senior pastor started the exodus with his last sermon being on Easter Sunday? Needless to say 2020 was sad on many levels. I didn't know about the reasons behind the split until this year after we started to meet in person again.

The search for a senior pastor has been slow. However there's been a wonderful bright spot in all of this when the church decided to hire an interim senior pastor. We were able to coax him out of retirement and he's a truly wonderful man of God, personable and genuinely friendly, with a great sense of humor and storytelling skill which he uses in his sermons to great effect.

He recently finished a wonderful series on the Beatitudes, the last sermon of which he spoke about Jesus calling his people the light of the world. You think that's great, and it is, but it got even better. He told the congregation to imagine if all the Christians were taken from this world and the repercussions. No more Holy Spirit. Evil unchecked. And then he mentioned that he believed in the pretribulation rapture and spoke about our blessed hope in depth. Our longtime senior pastor never talked about the rapture. I'm not even sure if he believed in it. We only discussed it in our Sunday school groups.

During that part of the sermon I remember I got goosebumps and realized why I've been drawn to him from the beginning. This Sunday I plan to talk to him again and encourage him to continue bringing it up.
 
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Glorydaz

Member
Also quite a number of believers here in Australia, (& elsewhere) are now meeting as the underground church. You see even if our specific region is not in lock down, we still can`t visit friends at their home. I believe I should obey God who says to meet together all the more `as you see the Day approaching.` (Heb. 10: 25)

Thus when I go to visit my friends, (those whom I am mentoring) to share, study God`s word and pray, I make sure I go behind their gates into their backyards so that my car is not visible from the street. Who would have thought such a thing in Australia!
I'm expecting more home churches to pop up. It's not like believers haven't been there before.
 

Love His Appearing

Well-Known Member
He told the congregation to imagine if all the Christians were taken from this world and the repercussions. No more Holy Spirit. Evil unchecked.
I've been thinking a lot about this lately. We are watching the evil unfold daily and the Restrainer is still here. Can you even imagine how awful it will be for those left behind? The sheer heaviness of the darkness. I am so grateful for the HOPE that lies within me. JESUS.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Last year during the early stages of the "plandemic" my SBC church went through the beginning of an unfortunate split. During the year many church members left, wonderful brothers and sisters in Christ, many of whom had young families. Our children's ministry dropped in numbers substantially and our disheartened children's pastor resigned to go back to his hometown.

I'd say a less than two thirds of the congregation remained, with our Sunday school classes for both adults and children taking a big hit. To make matters even worse there was a big void left in the pastoral staff with most of them leaving. Did I mention that our senior pastor started the exodus with his last sermon being on Easter Sunday? Needless to say 2020 was sad on many levels. I didn't know about the reasons behind the split until this year after we started to meet in person again.

The search for a senior pastor has been slow. However there's been a wonderful bright spot in all of this when the church decided to hire an interim senior pastor. We were able to coax him out of retirement and he's a truly wonderful man of God, personable and genuinely friendly, with a great sense of humor and storytelling skill which he uses in his sermons to great effect.

He recently finished a wonderful series on the Beatitudes, the last sermon of which he spoke about Jesus calling his people the light of the world. You think that's great, and it is, but it got even better. He told the congregation to imagine if all the Christians were taken from this world and the repercussions. No more Holy Spirit. Evil unchecked. And then he mentioned that he believed in the pretribulation rapture and spoke about our blessed hope in depth. Our longtime senior pastor never talked about the rapture. I'm not even sure if he believed in it. We only discussed it in our Sunday school groups.

During that part of the sermon I remember I got goosebumps and realized why I've been drawn to him from the beginning. This Sunday I plan to talk to him again and encourage him to continue bringing it up.
Feel for you, been in a church that split, brilliant church remember when at a meeting one of the leaders got up and said please remember we are all methodists I thought you should not have said that. their was uproar and many walked out, so sad.
 

Mama Bug

Well-Known Member
I rarely hear about Bible prophecy. I imagine it was talked about more when I was a kid but I can't remember. At the church I used to go to, our pastor had left. He may have mentioned the Rapture a time or two. He said something to the effect of the end times are important to talk about but so is preparing for it or something. I can't recall what he said exactly. He didn't seem to think it was too important to talk about though, because he rarely brought it up in the 6 or so years he was there.

Anyway, we couldn't find another pastor so a retired pastor came out of retirement and took over for a few years. I absolutely loved him! He wasn't afraid to talk about prophecy. He mentioned the Rapture frequently. He didn't preach on it but maybe once if that but he would mention it. He preached on the bowl judgements one Sunday too. He was also a friend of my dad from school days. He's the only one I've heard talk about it in a long, long time. He unfortunately had to step down due to health issues in 2019 and passed away last year.

So far the pastor of the church that I'm in now has not talked about the end times but maybe he will in time. Prophecy is what, a quarter or a third of the Bible? Pastors need to be sounding the alarm. They need to be talking about this.
 

Bethlehem57

Well-Known Member
Feel for you, been in a church that split, brilliant church remember when at a meeting one of the leaders got up and said please remember we are all methodists I thought you should not have said that. their was uproar and many walked out, so sad.
We had been attending a SBC in our area until our Pastor moved on to Mark 13, resulting in feeling really depressed.

Found a Calvary Chapel nearby and love this Pastor’s preaching. The Rapture, Tribulation, Messianic Kingdom and events as we head into the last days are openly preached. How refreshing!

No church is perfect, because it’s human and it’s here. I can see people meeting together as in the early church happening…….likely to happen sooner than later because the world sure hates us! Definitely see this happening after we are gone!
 

PortWen

Well-Known Member
Really, everyone I hear from america always has something to say about bible prophesy. Here in uk its practically non existant, been a christian for 35 yrs and not a single thing at any time about bible prophecy, not once however have been on the internet and noticed maybe 2 churches have some degree of talk on bible prophecy eg. in crawley heard a series of talks but they were of post trib. and the other in southend, keep meaning to listen to some of the talks but havent got round to them, also have been involved in bible study in my last church in reigate that have touched on them but noticed on the other mens faces a total lack of knowledge or interest. That about sums it all up. When I came on r.f I felt like Elijah when he said I am the only one left, knew I wasnt but sure felt like it, still feel there are maybe a dozen or so people in the entire uk of maybe 70 million, sincerely hope I am wrong and just being negative.
I’m in the UK, in the south east, have no church to go to and am totally on my own as a believer…I know not even one other Christian. The last church I attended here was in 2014….local Baptist…and I left after a long chat with the pastor and discovering he was amillennial and a rapture denier (amongst other issues.) I agree with you that Americans are way ahead in prophecy teaching.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
This Rapture Resistance
By Terry James

Saturdays are no longer my favorites like they were when I worked full time in my jobs in advertising and public relations. Back then, I welcomed the relaxation that came with the day immediately following hectic weeks of meetings with clients and concocting and conducting campaigns for corporations to get products and services in front of the public.

Nowadays, Saturdays bore me, because I like to start my days early by listening to TV programs while sipping coffee. The programs are mostly preacher boys (as they’re sometimes called here in the south) such as Dr. David Jeremiah, Dr. Robert Jeffress, Les Feldick, and others who present daily programs. These regularly scheduled programs aren’t on my satellite system on Saturdays. My routine is disrupted.

However, a past Saturday, I was pleasantly surprised while clicking through the channels when I heard a program that was presenting a documentary that piqued my interest. It was on Daystar Television, and it featured of a number of men and a couple of women talking about how true Bible prophecy is a dwindling topic in most all churches in America.

I suspected who a couple of the men were, but never knew for sure, because, of course, I’m now blind. I started watching somewhere in the middle of the documentary, so didn’t have a frame of reference for those speaking in brief clips.

I did think I recognized my dear friend Jan Markell — she will have to let me know — but she was the only one who sounded familiar.

Those who addressed the matters involved were true Bible teachers, to be sure. They outlined precisely how the churches in America today are avoiding talk of prophecy and of Christ’s return. Pastors, they correctly surmised, are most afraid that talk of the Rapture of the Church and of Christ’s return and other prophetic topics will somehow interfere with “growing their churches.”

How sad but true their collective assessments were. The closer the time comes for Jesus to return to earth and correct this horrendous mess Satan and his minions have made of the planet, the less preachers want to preach it, and the more many in the pews prefer not to hear about it.

I thought while listening: How true it is, the forewarning of Jesus Himself when He asked whether He would find faith on the earth when He comes back.

Those being interviewed in the documentary went into depth about how those with the Holy Spirit were the people mentioned in the parable of the ten virgins. How those who have the Holy Spirit within will go into the Marriage Supper of the Lamb. Those without the “oil for their lamps” (the Holy Spirit) won’t be part of that glorious event. They spoke of how there was great resistance not only to talk of the Rapture, but to the belief that the Holy Spirit even, in fact, exists.

It is abundantly clear that those who don’t even believe the Holy Spirit exists lead the way in the “Rapture resistance” that is the title of this commentary. A study looks more deeply into this tragic, downward spiral in Christendom.

Of an estimated 176 million American adults who identify as Christian, just 6% or 15 million of them actually hold a biblical worldview, a new study from Arizona Christian University shows.

The finding was published by the Cultural Research Center of Arizona Christian University in its recently released American Worldview Inventory, an annual survey that evaluates the worldview of the U.S. adult population. Conducted in February, the survey included a nationally representative sample of 2,000 adults.

The study shows, in general, that while a majority of America’s self-identified Christians, including many who identify as evangelical, believe that God is all-powerful, all-knowing and is the Creator of the universe, more than half reject a number of biblical teachings and principles, including the existence of the Holy Spirit.

Strong majorities also errantly believe that all religious faiths are of equal value, people are basically good and that people can use acts of goodness to earn their way into Heaven. The study further showed that majorities don’t believe in moral absolutes; consider feelings, experience, or the input of friends and family as their most trusted sources of moral guidance; and say that having faith matters more than which faith you pursue. (“Most adult U.S. Christians don’t believe Holy Spirit is real: Study,” by Leonardo Blair, Christian Post Reporter, Christian Post, October 1, 2021)


How accurate this polling research is, I don’t know. But certainly all one has to do is to mention the Rapture to most who claim to be Christians and there is either silence or statements like “I don’t like to think about prophecy. It scares me.”

It apparently scares most pastors, too, but for a different reason — the one mentioned earlier.

To eliminate the Holy Spirit is to eliminate the “hope” that is within the “blessed hope” of Titus 2:13.

Jesus told the disciples — and us down through the centuries — that if He went away, He would send the “comforter” — the Holy Spirit. God the Holy Spirit (the Third Person of the Triune Godhead) came at Pentecost (see Acts chapter 2) to indwell and comfort believers until Jesus returns bodily to set up His Millennial Kingdom.

The Holy Spirit is the Restrainer (see 2 Thessalonians chapter 2). He holds back full-blown wickedness at this very moment. The Holy Spirit will remove from that office of Restrainer when we who are true believers are taken instantly to be with Christ.

Here is what Jesus said about that moment. And, despite what a number of seminary professors say, it is a Rapture passage — a mystery that the great Apostle Paul would later reveal in His epistles to the Corinthians and Thessalonians.

“Let not your heart be troubled: ye believe in God, believe also in me. In my Father’s house are many mansions: if it were not so, I would have told you. I go to prepare a place for you. And if I go and prepare a place for you, I will come again, and receive you unto myself; that where I am, there ye may be also.” – (John 14:1–3)

—Terry

https://www.raptureforums.com/end-times/this-rapture-resistance/

Sadly, I hear and have heard more about prophecy in some of the preterist/amillennial churches I have attended than in any of the premillennial churches I have attended. Given the doctrinal prominence of prophecy in premillennial churches, the horrific earthly consequences of being left behind, the hope found in the pre-Tribulation Rapture, and the sin and persecution conditions on Earth today, this makes no sense at all.

[For premillennialsists that may think only of the Rapture, Tribulation, Millennium, etc. as prophecy], the preterist/amillennial churches are/were teaching and preaching on fulfilled Messianic prophecy, the Second Coming, Great White Throne Judgement, Heaven, and Hell, although not about the Rapture, a literal 7-year Tribulation, or a literal Millennium. In such preterist/amillennial churches, prophecy is not nearly as prominent doctrinally as it is in premillennial churches.

Studying/reading/hearing preaching and teaching about fulfilled OT prophecy surely gives grounds to believe as-yet-unfulfilled OT and NT prophecy, is a great part of apologetics and understanding the Bible, a great witnessing tool to the lost, and a great faith building tool to believers. Defense against false christs and gods, armor for times of demonic attack and persecution, etc.

Speaking as a lay person, Pastors that fail to preach and teach about prophecy, at least the very basics that prove Jesus' divinity, resurrection, ascension, and Second Coming, are negligent at best, and tools of satan at worst. A good Bible study using the Apostle's Creed as a framework would include such basics . . . how difficult can this possibly be?!!! :furious


According to GotQuestions, "The story of Jesus saturates the metanarrative of the Bible, and prophecies of His first advent are found throughout the Old Testament. Allusions to Him also come up in micro ways, as many people and events hint at the work He would accomplish. One scholar, J. Barton Payne, has found as many as 574 verses in the Old Testament that somehow point to or describe or reference the coming Messiah. Alfred Edersheim found 456 Old Testament verses referring to the Messiah or His times. Conservatively, Jesus fulfilled at least 300 prophecies in His earthly ministry." https://www.gotquestions.org/prophecies-of-Jesus.html


If I were a man, I'd start my own church. I'm not, so not called to do so . . .


May the Pastors of our time be filled with The Holy Ghost and led to preach and teach the unadulterated Bible and The Gospel, to include the prophetic aspects.


:pray :pray :amen :amen
 
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