The Real Common Trait Behind the Mass Shooting in Boulder...Is Something You Probably Already Know

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
And isn't a big part of the mental health angle that most are on prescription meds?
In my work as a Biblical Counselor, I found a fairly profound difference between those troubled individuals on psycho-active medications and those who were not on them. It was as if the drug-takers could not think rationally and it was very difficult to get them to focus on their role in causing at least some of their own problems. It is known that SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) actually "change the architecture of the brain" and that cannot be good news for long-term brain health. I worked with one poor lady who was on SIX different psycho-active medications. She told me that a couple of years before I saw her that she had had more than one episode of hallucinations, paranoid delusions, etc. She said that, at one point, she was taken to the Emergency Room because she was claiming that she was Jesus Christ and that she could walk on water! I expect that her real problem was the extreme negligence (both of her parents were alcoholics) she suffered as a child along with physical abuse as well. The dear soul related an incident that nearly ended her life, when she was three, while both of her parents were passed out in the living room in alcoholic stupor.
 
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NewWine2020

Well-Known Member
And just like clockwork, tomorrow SCOTUS starts hearing arguments from Biden, et.al., to allow law enforcement (which I’m sure includes NG, etc) to go into any home WITHOUT a warrant, and confiscate firearms.
You know, don’t let a crisis go to waste.

Now let’s see, they REFUSED to even hear any arguments regarding election fraud, but jump on this like a pit bull on a pot roast!
:apostasy :apostasy :apostasy :apostasy

They sure aren’t bashful about showing us where their priorities lie, are they?

And I don’t know if anyone saw this, I did not see another post about it but police apprehended ANOTHER person with multiple weapons and body armor, possibly a mentally ill attempted copycat shooter in Atlanta, GA. It’s like the govt is ‘activating‘ it’s mentally ill sleeper agents or something.

That’s really a shame for the Dims that the arrested shooter they wanted SO BAD to be a white man turns out to be a mentally ill middle eastern immigrant. The lib media is really trying to spin it, calling him (almost regretfully) “Al Aliwi Alissa” rather than his given name of “Al Aliwi Al Issa“ so they can call him “Mr Allisa” rather than “Mr. Al Issa.” Basically trying to “whitewash” his name to make it sound less “Islamic/mid-eastern”

It‘s a minor, nitpicking detail I know but it’s so obvious that Dims know the power of language and verbiage and are still trying to put what spin on it they can. They just cannot help themselves.
 
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daygo

Well-Known Member
In my work as a Biblical Counselor, I found a fairly profound difference between those troubled individuals on psycho-active medications and those who were not on them. It was as if the drug-takers could not think rationally and it was very difficult to get them to focus on their role in causing at least some of their own problems. It is known that SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) actually "change the architecture of the brain" and that cannot be good news for long-term brain health. I worked with one poor lady who was on SIX different psycho-active medications. She told me that a couple of years before I saw her that she had had more than one episode of hallucinations, paranoid delusions, etc. She said that, at one point, she was taken to the Emergency Room because she was claiming that she was Jesus Christ and that she could walk on water! I expect that her real problem was the extreme negligence (both of her parents were alcoholics) she suffered as a child along with physical abuse as well. The dear soul related an incident that nearly ended her life while both of her parents were passed out in the living room in alcoholic stupor.
Part of mental health is insight, when people take medication it works very well so well that they think medication is no longer needed so stop taking the pills and with them no longer have this insight, they become very unwell they become a danger to themselves or others because to them they are fine and have no problems. Could say more, but do not want to bore you.
 
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Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Part of mental health is insight, when people take medication it works very well so well that they think medication is no longer needed so stop taking the pills and with them no longer have this insight, they become very unwell they become a danger to themselves or others because to them they are fine and have no problems. Could say more, but do not want to bore you.
The woman who I was speaking of was on her full medication schedule, when she experienced her "psychotic breaks". Are you saying that the pills give people "insight"? :(
 

crossnote

fully dependent upon His grace
She told me that a couple of years before I saw her that she had had more than one episode of hallucinations, paranoid delusions, etc. She said that, at one point, she was taken to the Emergency Room because she was claiming that she was Jesus Christ and that she could walk on water!
That was a pretty common phenomenon with those on LSD.
 

alisani

Well-Known Member
In my work as a Biblical Counselor, I found a fairly profound difference between those troubled individuals on psycho-active medications and those who were not on them. It was as if the drug-takers could not think rationally and it was very difficult to get them to focus on their role in causing at least some of their own problems. It is known that SSRIs (Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors) actually "change the architecture of the brain" and that cannot be good news for long-term brain health. I worked with one poor lady who was on SIX different psycho-active medications. She told me that a couple of years before I saw her that she had had more than one episode of hallucinations, paranoid delusions, etc. She said that, at one point, she was taken to the Emergency Room because she was claiming that she was Jesus Christ and that she could walk on water! I expect that her real problem was the extreme negligence (both of her parents were alcoholics) she suffered as a child along with physical abuse as well. The dear soul related an incident that nearly ended her life, when she was three, while both of her parents were passed out in the living room in alcoholic stupor.
Sorry but you're not going to sell me on the idea that the SSRIs are to blame here. But there is NO reason for her to have been on 6 different psychotropic meds at one time. The drug interactions alone could have been responsible for her hallucinations. Additionally, people with serious psychotic and/or mood disorders are notoriously noncompliant when it comes to medication management. It is also common enough that there are drug and/or alcohol induced behaviors associated with certain types of spmi as people try to self-medicate with regards to their symptoms.

I am in agreement with you completely that, as a whole, the mental health care system is responsible for gross neglect and outright fraud. And because there is money to be made by over-prescribing with little to no oversight or regulation, this evil trend will continue and people will be routinely failed by such a system.

I bring this up, not to challenge or chide you. But to remind ourselves that we have people here with mental illness. Members, lurkers, etc. Historically, SSRIs, especially used in tandem with effective therapies such as CBT, have shown to be very helpful in the management of symptoms and allow many to experience a quality of life they would not otherwise have. We don't want to use anecdotal incidents to frighten people away from medicine which may be helpful or necessary for them.
 

depserv

Well-Known Member
Another common denominator rarely mentioned is the power of advertising. Every one of these mass murders is not just reported by the liberal press, it's heavily advertised, dominating news for awhile, how long being determined by body count. And one thing we know very well is that advertising is very effective at influencing human behavior; if it wasn't, we would not have a multi-billion dollar advertising industry.

People who know just how well advertising works pay a great deal of money to put their propaganda into the small slots of time we call commercials. So don't you think the much bigger slots of time would have an even greater effect? And the liberal press knows it, because it's how it makes its money. The concept of copycat crimes is not new; I remember hearing about it even when I was a child in the 1960s (funny how you don't hear much about it these days).

This accounts for why most of these are committed with the same kind of weapon, the so-called assault weapon, even though other weapons that are easier to get have resulted in much higher body counts. Those who do what the advertising influences them to do naturally use the kind of weapon being advertised.

The biggest mass shooting in America was the Las Vegas shooting; that one killed 58 people. An arson fire in NYC in 1990 at a bar called the Happyland Social Club killed 87, and it didn't take any planning, or anything but about a dollar's worth of gasoline and a couple of matches. An islamic terrorist in Nice France killed 86 people by driving a big truck into a densely packed crowd. These mass murders were reported but were not advertised (and thank God for that). So why do those who obviously want to rack up a high body count not use the weapons that have proven to give them what they seek?

I think the answer is pretty obvious: they are simply doing what the smiling liberals on TV tell them to do, and that includes using the kind of weapon being advertised.

None of this makes the murderers any less guilty or any less evil. If you talk someone into committing murder you are partly guilty of the crime but your guilt does not make the one who actually commits the act any less so. But I like to point out that the liberal press is pure evil, and these mass murder are just one among many manifestations of that evil.

Another common denominator is that in most cases there is no one among the victims armed and able to fight back. Most of these take place in so-called gun free zones (I don't know if this one did). Joe Biden brags about the role he played in getting these killing zones established.
 
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Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Sorry but you're not going to sell me on the idea that the SSRIs are to blame here. But there is NO reason for her to have been on 6 different psychotropic meds at one time. The drug interactions alone could have been responsible for her hallucinations. Additionally, people with serious psychotic and/or mood disorders are notoriously noncompliant when it comes to medication management. It is also common enough that there are drug and/or alcohol induced behaviors associated with certain types of spmi as people try to self-medicate with regards to their symptoms.

I am in agreement with you completely that, as a whole, the mental health care system is responsible for gross neglect and outright fraud. And because there is money to be made by over-prescribing with little to no oversight or regulation, this evil trend will continue and people will be routinely failed by such a system.

I bring this up, not to challenge or chide you. But to remind ourselves that we have people here with mental illness. Members, lurkers, etc. Historically, SSRIs, especially used in tandem with effective therapies such as CBT, have shown to be very helpful in the management of symptoms and allow many to experience a quality of life they would not otherwise have. We don't want to use anecdotal incidents to frighten people away from medicine which may be helpful or necessary for them.
I am not trying to sell anyone on the idea that SSRIs are to blame. I think the poor woman's problems stemmed from her very dysfunctional family system. She was going to a psychiatrist who loaded her up with drugs and she was not doing CBT. Even young psychiatrists have been HIGHLY critical of the psychiatry profession over the use of drugs in place of any other interventions.
 

sawas

Well-Known Member
Acute paranoia, delusions, and depression were rampant among them, with at least 36 of the killers committing suicide on or near the scene. Seven others died in police shootouts they had little hope of surviving (a.k.a. “suicide by cop”). And according to additional research we completed recently, at least 38 of them displayed signs of possible mental health problems prior to the killings. (That data is now included in the interactive guide linked above.)

Thanks for sharing this. The above portion is, I think, really important. I'm sure that his radicalized Islamic views played a role, but in truth I think that is merely symptomatic of deeper spiritual distress. I continue to believe that much of, if not most, mental illness (aided, perhaps, by the confirming influences of false science and/or false religion) is spiritual at the root.
 
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alisani

Well-Known Member
I am not trying to sell anyone on the idea that SSRIs are to blame. I think the poor woman's problems stemmed from her very dysfunctional family system. She was going to a psychiatrist who loaded her up with drugs and she was not doing CBT. Even young psychiatrists have been HIGHLY critical of the psychiatry profession over the use of drugs in place of any other interventions.
Cool, I just wanted to clarify that one point. ;) Reading your posts from other threads, I realize we are not going to agree on all points, however, it is clear to me that you love the Lord and you love His people! :hat:hug

Big Pharma is also to blame, imo. They pay serious court to both GPs, who often prescribe out of ignorance or greed, and psychiatrists, whose egos and greed mean that psychiatry leads all medical fields in terms of insurance fraud. So I am in full agreement with you there.

I strongly believe that it is imperative to present a balanced view on the melding of the medical and spiritual in mental health. Many Christians are afraid to engage in conversation about mental health because they worry that there is something wrong with their faith if they need to access "secular" resources for themselves or loved ones. Which is odd when you consider that no one with a diagnosis of, say, cancer would hesitate in accessing secular medical care. This strongly suggests that the stigma associated with mental health is still very much alive and well.

I have seen people suffer because they fear mental illness represents a lack in faith. Or they are taught that God will heal them solely through prayer. Or, even worse, that their mental health issues are solely their own fault due to sin. Or that their mental illness is only ever due to demonic possession or oppression. While those things (sin and satanic influence) are very much a reality to be assessed and addressed, they do not represent the majority of experience for those suffering with mental illness. Very often, you don't have to look much further than nature, nurture and/or life circumstances to find the root of their suffering.

People are not well-educated as to the proper use of said medications. And how can we expect them to be when, as you so rightly say, they cannot trust the "experts" to be properly knowledgeable or properly motivated in dispensing medications? Many fear escalation of symptoms, or possible addiction. As Christian professionals, we have an obligation to provide informed psycho-education, while also incorporating godly principles as the very core of any therapeutic intervention we would undertake with our clients. Science without faith is like food without nutrition.

In my working and personal life, I have seen too many people shamed because they are treated as if their struggles represent some type of unresolved sin or moral failure. Some try to argue that mental illness is just a social construct, which completely ignores the emotional distress experienced by those struggling. Spurgeon, who himself struggled with depression, speaks to the reality of mental illness among all humankind:

"The mind can descend far lower than the body, for in it are bottomless pits. The flesh can bear only a certain number of wounds and no more, but the soul can bleed in ten thousand ways, and die over and over again each hour."

Medicine, at its best, is a God-given tool, to be used to counteract the aftereffects of what sin has wrought in this world since the Fall. Like any tool, it can be misused. But that sad fact should not keep us from using it when necessary, in tandem with prayer, scripture, biblical counseling and strong support systems from our brothers and sisters in Christ. God gave us faith, but He also gave us common sense. When I go to bed at night, I turn to God in prayer for protection through the night. But I also use the common sense He gifted me and lock my doors too!

There are many scriptures which, imo, speak to God's provision of the use of medicine.

Jeremiah 8:22
"Is there no balm in Gilead?
Is there no physician there?
Why then is there no healing
for the wound of my people?"

Ezekiel 47:12
"Fruit trees of all kinds will grow on both banks of the river. Their leaves will not wither, nor will their fruit fail. Every month they will bear fruit, because the water from the sanctuary flows to them. Their fruit will serve for food and their leaves for healing.”

Revelation 22:2
"...down the middle of the great street of the city. On each side of the river stood the tree of life, bearing twelve crops of fruit, yielding its fruit every month. And the leaves of the tree are for the healing of the nations."

It is important that medicine be considered for use in healing. Medication should not be used to keep people in a numbed state, allowing them to avoid dealing with the root cause of their illness, whether that be sin or emotional distress. God wants us whole and we should follow the healing ministry of Jesus, whose focus was always directed towards spiritual healing.
 
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Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Cool, I just wanted to clarify that one point. ;) Reading your posts from other threads, I realize we are not going to agree on all points, however, it is clear to me that you love the Lord and you love His people! :hat:hug

Big Pharma is also to blame, imo. They pay serious court to both GPs, who often prescribe out of ignorance or greed, and psychiatrists, whose egos and greed mean that psychiatry leads all medical fields in terms of insurance fraud. So I am in full agreement with you there.

I strongly believe that it is imperative to present a balanced view on the melding of the medical and spiritual in mental health. Many Christians are afraid to engage in conversation about mental health because they worry that there is something wrong with their faith if they need to access "secular" resources for themselves or loved ones. Which is odd when you consider that no one with a diagnosis of, say, cancer would hesitate in accessing secular medical care. This strongly suggests that the stigma associated with mental health is still very much alive and well.

I have seen people suffer because they fear mental illness represents a lack in faith. Or they are taught that God will heal them solely through prayer. Or, even worse, that their mental health issues are solely their own fault due to sin. Or that their mental illness is only ever due to demonic possession or oppression. While those things (sin and satanic influence) are very much a reality to be assessed and addressed, they do not represent the majority of experience for those suffering with mental illness. Very often, you don't have to look much further than nature, nurture and/or life circumstances to find the root of their suffering.

People are not well-educated as to the proper use of said medications. And how can we expect them to be when, as you so rightly say, they cannot trust the "experts" to be properly knowledgeable or properly motivated in dispensing medications? Many fear escalation of symptoms, or possible addiction. As Christian professionals, we have an obligation to provide informed psycho-education, while also incorporating godly principles as the very core of any therapeutic intervention we would undertake with our clients. Science without faith is like food without nutrition.

In my working and personal life, I have seen too many people shamed because they are treated as if their struggles represent some type of unresolved sin or moral failure. Some try to argue that mental illness is just a social construct, which completely ignores the emotional distress experienced by those struggling. Spurgeon, who himself struggled with depression, speaks to the reality of mental illness among all humankind:

"The mind can descend far lower than the body, for in it are bottomless pits. The flesh can bear only a certain number of wounds and no more, but the soul can bleed in ten thousand ways, and die over and over again each hour."

Medicine, at its best, is a God-given tool, to be used to counteract the aftereffects of what sin has wrought in this world since the Fall. Like any tool, it can be misused. But that sad fact should not keep us from using it when necessary, in tandem with prayer, scripture, biblical counseling and strong support systems from our brothers and sisters in Christ. God gave us faith, but He also gave us common sense. When I go to bed at night, I turn to God in prayer for protection through the night. But I also use the common sense He gifted me and lock my doors too!

There are many scriptures which, imo, speak to God's provision of the use of medicine.

Jeremiah 8:22
"Is there no balm in Gilead?
Is there no physician there?
Why then is there no healing
for the wound of my people?"

Ezekiel 47:12
"Fruit trees of all kinds will grow on both banks of the river. Their leaves will not wither, nor will their fruit fail. Every month they will bear fruit, because the water from the sanctuary flows to them. Their fruit will serve for food and their leaves for healing.”

Revelation 22:2
"...down the middle of the great street of the city. On each side of the river stood the tree of life, bearing twelve crops of fruit, yielding its fruit every month. And the leaves of the tree are for the healing of the nations."

It is important that medicine be considered for use in healing. Medication should not be used to keep people in a numbed state, allowing them to avoid dealing with the root cause of their illness, whether that be sin or emotional distress. God wants us whole and we should follow the healing ministry of Jesus, whose focus was always directed towards spiritual healing.
I think yours is a balanced approach. There are some diseases of the brain, like schizophrenia, for example, that interfere with rational processes and the medical establishment does not yet have the tools to heal them (and may never have them). All that can be done, unfortunately, is medicating the symptoms. I have a Christian friend whose son is schizophrenic (runs on both sides of the family). He will often weep and ask her when his brain will get better. Very sad, but we know that he will experience complete healing in the life to come--he is a fervent Christian. The Lord is good in that way--often the most faithful witnesses are those with profound brain dysfunction. Down's Syndrome kids are often the Lord's own special children.

In Spurgeon's case, he experienced a great deal of suffering both physically and emotionally (he was one of only eight children out of seventeen to survive to adulthood in his family). He had other tragedies in his life as well. The Bible often identifies what we would call "depression" as sadness or dismay (discouragement) as well as fear (what we might call "anxiety"). There were many Old Testament figures who struggled with those emotions: Elijah, David, Hannah, Naomi, Solomon, Nehemiah, Job and Jeremiah (known as the "weeping prophet") among others. Jesus Himself, by His own report, struggled with grief. There is NO shame in sadness, fear or sadness combined with discouragement. Christians who condemn others for "not having enough faith or prayer" are ignorant of the human heart and the human condition, in this fallen world. Those who are struggling need reassurance and hope, not shame. Shame is from the evil one--as is shaming. Spiritual healing is by the power of the Holy Spirit and it cannot be rushed. Numbing the pain with various nostrums as well as hedonistic pleasure (drinking, drugging, shopping, eating, etc.) only delay the healing or compound the problem of human suffering with even more suffering.

There are cases where a combination of brain dysfunction is mixed with spiritual malaise and medication might be helpful in those situations, but, in my opinion, far too many people are loaded with prescriptions when they just need some encouragement and peace in their lives.
 
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alisani

Well-Known Member
I think yours is a balanced approach. There are some diseases of the brain, like schizophrenia, for example, that interfere with rational processes and the medical establishment does not yet have the tools to heal them (and may never have them). All that can be done, unfortunately, is medicating the symptoms. I have a Christian friend whose son is schizophrenic (runs on both sides of the family). He will often weep and ask her when his brain will get better. Very sad, but we know that he will experience complete healing in the life to come--he is a fervent Christian. The Lord is good in that way--often the most faithful witnesses are those with profound brain dysfunction. Down Syndrome kids are typically the Lord's own special children.

In Spurgeon's case, he experienced a great deal of suffering both physically and emotionally (he was one of only eight children out of seventeen to survive to adulthood. He had other tragedies in his life as well. The Bible often identifies what we would call "depression" as sadness or dismay (discouragement) as well as fear (what we might call "anxiety"). There were many Old Testament figures who struggled with those emotions: Elijah, David, Hannah, Naomi, Solomon, Nehemiah, Job and Jeremiah (known as the "weeping prophet") among others. Jesus Himself, by His own report, struggled with grief. There is NO shame in sadness, fear or sadness. Christians who condemn others for "not having enough faith or prayer" are ignorant of the human heart and the human condition in this fallen world. Those who are struggling need reassurance and hope, not shame. Shame is from the evil one--as is shaming. Spiritual healing is by the power of the Holy Spirit and it cannot be rushed. Numbing the pain with various nostrums as well as hedonistic pleasure (drinking, drugging, shopping, eating, etc.) only delay the healing or compound the problem of human suffering with even more suffering.

There are cases where a combination of brain dysfunction is compounded by spiritual malaise and medication might be helpful in those situations, but, in my opinion, far too many people are loaded with prescriptions when they just need some encouragement and peace in their lives.
Agree completely sister. If we lead with Christ, in ourselves, in our work and with each person, He will direct their care. Money is a big part of the push for medicine but the sin of pride among professionals is a big part of it too. I am not a fan of the psychiatric community for those reasons.

One day, the great Cure giver will eliminate all the pain that has come about since the Fall. Til then we who are of Christ are all caregivers.
 

sawas

Well-Known Member
I think yours is a balanced approach. There are some diseases of the brain, like schizophrenia, for example, that interfere with rational processes and the medical establishment does not yet have the tools to heal them (and may never have them). All that can be done, unfortunately, is medicating the symptoms. I have a Christian friend whose son is schizophrenic (runs on both sides of the family). He will often weep and ask her when his brain will get better. Very sad, but we know that he will experience complete healing in the life to come--he is a fervent Christian. The Lord is good in that way--often the most faithful witnesses are those with profound brain dysfunction. Down Syndrome kids are typically the Lord's own special children.

In Spurgeon's case, he experienced a great deal of suffering both physically and emotionally (he was one of only eight children out of seventeen to survive to adulthood in his family). He had other tragedies in his life as well. The Bible often identifies what we would call "depression" as sadness or dismay (discouragement) as well as fear (what we might call "anxiety"). There were many Old Testament figures who struggled with those emotions: Elijah, David, Hannah, Naomi, Solomon, Nehemiah, Job and Jeremiah (known as the "weeping prophet") among others. Jesus Himself, by His own report, struggled with grief. There is NO shame in sadness, fear or sadness combined with discouragement. Christians who condemn others for "not having enough faith or prayer" are ignorant of the human heart and the human condition, in this fallen world. Those who are struggling need reassurance and hope, not shame. Shame is from the evil one--as is shaming. Spiritual healing is by the power of the Holy Spirit and it cannot be rushed. Numbing the pain with various nostrums as well as hedonistic pleasure (drinking, drugging, shopping, eating, etc.) only delay the healing or compound the problem of human suffering with even more suffering.

There are cases where a combination of brain dysfunction is mixed with spiritual malaise and medication might be helpful in those situations, but, in my opinion, far too many people are loaded with prescriptions when they just need some encouragement and peace in their lives.
And that, in its turn, is a balanced response. :) Here are a few stray observations.

So, I continue to struggle with understanding (or buying into) conventional/secular perspectives on schizophrenia. (Side note: It appears that it might be relevant to the Boulder shooter and, more personally, with my own troubled brother.)

Per the American Journal of Psychiatry, January 2010: Understanding what causes schizophrenia is becoming harder and harder. We know that schizophrenia has genetic causes, since the most significant risk factor is having a first-degree relative with schizophrenia. However, most people with schizophrenia do not have an affected relative, and while the overall genetic contribution to schizophrenia may be large, the contribution of specific genes is very small. Candidate gene studies and more recent genome-wide association studies have had inconsistent results and indicate, at best, individual genes increase risk by less than 2 times—from an average population rate of 1 in 100 to 1.5 in 100.
As statisticians like to remind us, correlation is not causation, so I don't know how anything is really "known" about the genetic (or physiological) causes of this condition without the ability to even identify physiological markers. Nothing wrong with speculation...as an economist, I think my "science" is pretty-much all about speculation, however well informed it might be. It can be useful, unless you're predisposed to look only at particular relationships and automatically exclude others.

I used to go "round and round" with a good friend (a teacher) who (for a teacher) was fairly "expert" in regards to ADHD, who suggested a genetic cause since it "ran in families", which (coincidentally) were predominately single mother (absent father) households. I'm a bit more pragmatic (or cynical, depending on your POV) when thinking of Ritalin as "Dad in a Bottle". So too, looking at environmental factors (like drug use, etc.) can appear to amplify the correlation without ever solving the underlying "horse" and "cart" riddle.

These same experts get into very deep water (well over their heads, IMHO) when they try deal with the frequent (and typically serious) incidence of religious delusions in Schizophrenic patients (perhaps as many as 1/3 of patients, by various sources). The conventional view is, of course, some patients who are predisposed to religious behavior will be prone to such expressions of the condition. OK, maybe, but maybe not.
 
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antitox

Well-Known Member
One of my pastor's sons is a psychologist and worked in a public institution dealing with clinical cases and he was not happy with the regulations he had to follow there. He knew that the deep-seated issues were not getting addressed. He is now out of that and in a private role where he isn't limited by government anymore.
 

FaithnHope

Loved and changed by Jesus.

Report: Boulder shooter swore allegiance to ISIS, targeted 'Jewish store'​

King Soopers store in Boulder, where 10 were killed in shooting attack, calls itself “Your One-Stop Shop For Kosher Groceries.”​


https://www.israelnationalnews.com/News/News.aspx/299160
These are just Kroger stores with a different name but owned by Kroger and they have never advertised here for being a Jewish store. Muslims are Kosher too, that would likely be the only way he would have known, if he did.
 
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