The Purpose of Sanctification

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
What a blessing this was! Thanks for posting it! I’m delighted to learn about the OT sabbath and the work on the cross. That’s fascinating!

It’s hard for me to walk the line between the act of denying myself with the Holy Spirit sanctifying me. Where does He take over? When do I cross over into working in my own effort vs. allowing God to do it? It’s difficult.
 

mattfivefour

Administrator
Staff member
When do I cross over into working in my own effort vs. allowing God to do it?
You cross over when your faith is in your efforts. You cross over when you place your Bible reading, praying, tithing, worshiping, or any other thing as being necessary to your salvation. You cross over when your eyes are in some way and to some extent on your own works and not exclusively on His works.

We can do NOTHING to "improve" our salvation. Nothing. But we do "assist" God in the process of our sanctification. Let me explain how. When during Bible reading, or prayer, or reading a Christian article, or listening to a sermon, or through an inner conviction of the Holy Spirit (or perhaps any combination of those five things) you become aware of a specific shortcoming or sin in yourself, you need to "own" the sin or shortcoming (that is to say, admit to it fully) and then put the focus on God and not yourself. . Instead of telling God you will work hard to change that thing or eliminate it, ask God to change you in that thing—ask him to remove it or improve it. Then set your heart and mind to believe God's Word and, consequently, place your complete faith in the fact that Jesus Christ won the victory for you over that thing on the Cross and that you know God will, by His Holy Spirit, produce the character, the nature, of Christ in you. Sere? We set our will toward something, and then rely in faith on His power to do the work.

Does this mean that we therefore do not have to take common sense steps to protect ourselves from temptation? Of course not. It does not mean that we shouldn't determine not to hang out where the sinners hang out. In fact, it means, for example, that we should resolve never to go to bars, or strip clubs, or watch indecent or ungodly tv programs and movies, or hang around where foul language and ungodly speech and actions are the norm. It means we should refuse to listen to advice from ungodly people. It means we should strive to avoid hanging around with those who treat the things of God with no regard. It means we should read and meditate on God's word continually. That is not being fanatical, it is following God's own advice. When we do those things, we will find ourselves blessed and fruitful. (By the way, if that sounds a lot like the first few verses of Psalm 1, that's where the advice comes from. It's the very first Psalm I ever memorized. And I use it to myself often.) I can tell you that it simply becomes second nature to have God at the center of your thoughts. Don't make it an issue of legalism to do this (you know, by setting goals and time limits, etc): simply decide that in doing these things you will benefit ... and leave the work up to Him.

Does this help at all? I don't think I am saying it well. So please let me know where I can clarify more.
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
You cross over when your faith is in your efforts. You cross over when you place your Bible reading, praying, tithing, worshiping, or any other thing as being necessary to your salvation. You cross over when your eyes are in some way and to some extent on your own works and not exclusively on His works.

We can do NOTHING to "improve" our salvation. Nothing. But we do "assist" God in the process of our sanctification. Let me explain how. When during Bible reading, or prayer, or reading a Christian article, or listening to a sermon, or through an inner conviction of the Holy Spirit (or perhaps any combination of those five things) you become aware of a specific shortcoming or sin in yourself, you need to "own" the sin or shortcoming (that is to say, admit to it fully) and then put the focus on God and not yourself. . Instead of telling God you will work hard to change that thing or eliminate it, ask God to change you in that thing—ask him to remove it or improve it. Then set your heart and mind to believe God's Word and, consequently, place your complete faith in the fact that Jesus Christ won the victory for you over that thing on the Cross and that you know God will, by His Holy Spirit, produce the character, the nature, of Christ in you. Sere? We set our will toward something, and then rely in faith on His power to do the work.

Does this mean that we therefore do not have to take common sense steps to protect ourselves from temptation? Of course not. It does not mean that we shouldn't determine not to hang out where the sinners hang out. In fact, it means, for example, that we should resolve never to go to bars, or strip clubs, or watch indecent or ungodly tv programs and movies, or hang around where foul language and ungodly speech and actions are the norm. It means we should refuse to listen to advice from ungodly people. It means we should strive to avoid hanging around with those who treat the things of God with no regard. It means we should read and meditate on God's word continually. That is not being fanatical, it is following God's own advice. When we do those things, we will find ourselves blessed and fruitful. (By the way, if that sounds a lot like the first few verses of Psalm 1, that's where the advice comes from. It's the very first Psalm I ever memorized. And I use it to myself often.) I can tell you that it simply becomes second nature to have God at the center of your thoughts. Don't make it an issue of legalism to do this (you know, by setting goals and time limits, etc): simply decide that in doing these things you will benefit ... and leave the work up to Him.

Does this help at all? I don't think I am saying it well. So please let me know where I can clarify more.

Oh yes, it makes perfect sense! Thank you! It’s something I’ve begun to understand, but the way you explained it made it very clear. It’s kind of funny to think of how hard WE make things. Is this what Jesus meant in Matthew 11:29?

We are kind of experiencing this currently in moving. We started looking in a direction, and God has slammed many doors in order to direct our path to where are currently moving to. We took that first metaphorical step and humbly asked Him to do the rest and he has. It’s been one of the most effortless experiences of my life.
 

mattfivefour

Administrator
Staff member
Yes, Resting in Jesus truly IS rest!!!
Is this what Jesus meant in Matthew 11:29?
Yes. It means stopping striving for relationship with God (by your efforts and works) and resting in His finished work. This applies both to salvation and sanctification.

We can see this all played out in the OT account of the lives of the children of Israel. Servitude in Egypt under Pharaoh is a picture of man in slavery to sin under Satan. Deliverance from Egypt is a picture of salvation. The wanderings in the wilderness (where God took them from trust in themselves and their own thoughts and provision to trust in Him and His provision, and took them from mumbling and complaining to resting and accepting) are a picture of His dealings with us after salvation. The crossing of the Jordan is a picture of our complete submission to Him—our finally coming to that point of acceptance and trust in which we are matured/maturing as His children and resting in Him. (Jordan in Hebrew, by the way, means "to descend", "to lower". We cross metaphorical/spiritual Jordan when we ourselves are humbled to true submission to God—though still not perfect, since that comes only when we enter Heaven.) The Promised Land is a picture of our mature experiences in Christ, claiming the territory God has prepared for us, defeating those enemies—internal and external—that exist there, and accomplishing God's purposes through His leading and power.
 

Kem

Citizen
I don't think I am saying it well.
I think you said it perfectly! I especially like this;
Instead of telling God you will work hard to change that thing or eliminate it, ask God to change you in that thing—ask him to remove it or improve it.
Also this:
Does this mean that we therefore do not have to take common sense steps to protect ourselves from temptation? Of course not. It does not mean that we shouldn't determine not to hang out where the sinners hang out. In fact, it means, for example, that we should resolve never to go to bars, or strip clubs, or watch indecent or ungodly tv programs and movies, or hang around where foul language and ungodly speech and actions are the norm. It means we should refuse to listen to advice from ungodly people. It means we should strive to avoid hanging around with those who treat the things of God with no regard. It means we should read and meditate on God's word continually. That is not being fanatical, it is following God's own advice.
 
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