The end of Christianity in a small Scottish town

JamesSuth

Well-Known Member
At the weekend I visited a small town in Scotland, UK, where I grew up. As a child, there were three churches in the town. One Episcopal / Church of England, and two Church of Scotland, that had merged to effectively be one church with one board and minister. Attendance was about 30 at the Episcopal church, and around 80 - 90 at the Church of Scotland, which also had a lot of children attending youth focused events and clubs - 30 - 40 (almost exclusively without their parents). At the time I wondered how the church would survive in around 20 or 30 years time when all the elderly people were no longer alive. This past week I got my answer. The Episcopal church is still open but no longer have services as such. Instead a handful of attendees meet in a group and discuss their week. The theology is extremely liberal. The Church of Scotland (which as a denomination has turned away from God to focus on climate change, socialism, abcde issues etc), has issued a statement saying that the congregation has 'dwindled' and they are trying a cafe style church in a local cafe instead. When I left the congregation was around 15 (most of whom were likely not saved), so if it has dwindled from that, it is effectively over. No decision has been made on their one remaining church building, but closure must be on the cards, the last minister having retired around a decade ago.

I spent time over the weekend thinking about it. It is one thing to hear about how things have gone downhill since the past, it is another to witness it in one's own lifetime. The town I speak of has long been against Christ, despite the outward appearances, so perhaps it is ahead of the curve. But the decline is mirrored across the country to some extent. I'm reminded of Luke 18: 8 "Nevertheless when the Son of man cometh, shall he find faith on the earth?". If a falling away is a sign of the nearness of Christ's return, I saw it first hand last week. So I'm encouraged that He is near. I also pray for the handful of believers that I know of in the town. They are still there, and still praying, in a town that is more enthusiastic for this world's evil than most.
 

JoyJoyJoy

I Shall Not Be Moved
James, what you have described is hard for me to imagine. I live in the southern US, where churches abound. When I lived on a short road out in the country, there were 4 or 5 churches just within a few miles of each other. Now, here in town there are churches on either end of my main road, plus one more in the middle ( a non denomination, United Methodist and a John Calvin).

What you have reported is so sad. How can anyone in the small town come to know Jesus, if there is no one there to witness? I am sure glad you got saved in such a place.

I think Scottish accents are some of the best but sometimes Hard to understand.
 

Carl

Well-Known Member
Is Scotland the same as the United States? After WWII parents both worked to get the things the couldn't get because of the war? That boosted the standard of living to where both had to work to continue the life style? As a result the children didn't get the parents to show them what it means to live for Jesus?
 

JamesSuth

Well-Known Member
James, what you have described is hard for me to imagine. I live in the southern US, where churches abound. When I lived on a short road out in the country, there were 4 or 5 churches just within a few miles of each other. Now, here in town there are churches on either end of my main road, plus one more in the middle ( a non denomination, United Methodist and a John Calvin).

What you have reported is so sad. How can anyone in the small town come to know Jesus, if there is no one there to witness? I am sure glad you got saved in such a place.

I think Scottish accents are some of the best but sometimes Hard to understand.
Thank you, @JoyJoyJoy . I've been to the southern states and loved how many Christians there were!

Thankfully we know have national Christian radio, and tv, and the internet so people are still coming to faith :). And there are believers all over the place shining the light in the darkness. But the days of people having a church nearby, let alone one that preaches the Gospel is over.
 

Carl

Well-Known Member
There are some churches that broadcast on TV or on the internet. Some of them are really good too. But there is nothing like a real neighborhood church full of believers to boost a persons love for Christ.
Lord Thy Kingdom Come Thy Will be Done in the town that James Suth grew up in as it is in Heaven!
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
I am in a smallish town, about 30,000 6 maybe 7 churches each one have roughly 20 to 30 people, one church I went to had 5, mother father 3 children, that is approximately 1% of the population the one I go to is c/e and last week had 18 people, these are mainly elderly of which I am one of them, its not all doom and gloom however one church has started a splinter church hopefully that will go well, may say more in a couple of weeks.
 

cheeky200386

Well-Known Member
James, what you have described is hard for me to imagine. I live in the southern US, where churches abound. When I lived on a short road out in the country, there were 4 or 5 churches just within a few miles of each other. Now, here in town there are churches on either end of my main road, plus one more in the middle ( a non denomination, United Methodist and a John Calvin).

What you have reported is so sad. How can anyone in the small town come to know Jesus, if there is no one there to witness? I am sure glad you got saved in such a place.

I think Scottish accents are some of the best but sometimes Hard to understand.
Yikes even the churches you mentioned don't seem great. One is Calvinism, another Methodist (aren't they sold out for the LGBT) and who knows about the non denominational one.

I heard someone tell me that churches abound in the Bible belt but not many are actually Bible-Believing. I hope that's not true. I'll be moving to Florida this month and will find out.
 

Carl

Well-Known Member
There was a nondenominational church from a city about 50 miles away. They moved a person to Mt Clemens who started a prayer group. Then splintered when big enough and started another prayer group. They kept doing this and pretty soon they were meeting every Sunday in their own church. Their prayers really worked.
 

JoyJoyJoy

I Shall Not Be Moved
Yikes even the churches you mentioned don't seem great. One is Calvinism, another Methodist (aren't they sold out for the LGBT) and who knows about the non denominational one.

I heard someone tell me that churches abound in the Bible belt but not many are actually Bible-Believing. I hope that's not true. I'll be moving to Florida this month and will find out.
I like non dominational churches in general, at least the ones I have been to. There are still a good many Pentecostal Holiness churches around here, also.
I have never attended a sermon at any of the 3 churches on my street. There are 2 more churches within a mile or 2 of my house.

I haven't attended a Methodist or Presbyterian service in years but I think most are still Biblically sound in this area....my town is small and pretty conservative.
 

cheeky200386

Well-Known Member
I like non dominational churches in general, at least the ones I have been to. There are still a good many Pentecostal Holiness churches around here, also.
I have never attended a sermon at any of the 3 churches on my street. There are 2 more churches within a mile or 2 of my house.

I haven't attended a Methodist or Presbyterian service in years but I think most are still Biblically sound in this area....my town is small and pretty conservative.
Oh that's good to hear. I must be jaded living in MA. I found my church and it's a needle in a haystack. 9 out of 10 churches have the gay or BLM flags.
 

JoyJoyJoy

I Shall Not Be Moved
Oh that's good to hear. I must be jaded living in MA. I found my church and it's a needle in a haystack. 9 out of 10 churches have the gay or BLM flags.
There is a church a few miles away that has a huge BLM banner wrapped around it. Churches in my area are either predominately black or white, with some mixing. Almost all Asians that are not Buddists go to the catholic church. The church with the huge blm sign.....I have no idea if it's black or white.
I know some from India
go to a church in a larger town, that may be a Buddhist church but I am not sure.
 
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