St. Paul Schools Spend Millions on 'White Privilege' Training

Pebbles

Well-Known Member
http://eagnews.org/teachers-complai...s-spend-millions-on-white-privilege-training/



ST. PAUL, Minn. – Have the taxpayers of St. Paul spent nearly $3 million over the past five years to bring chaos and danger to their schools and students?

Apparently so.

In 2010, the St. Paul school district began a contractual relationship with the Pacific Educational Group, a San Francisco-based organization that tries to help public schools deal with achievement and disciplinary issues involving black students.

PEG packages and sells the concept of victimization, for a very high price.

It claims that the American education system is built around white culture, tradition and social norms – aka “white privilege” – to the unfair detriment of black students.

PEG believes that black students will only achieve if school curricula are customized to meet their cultural specifications. It also rejects the concept of using suspensions or expulsions to discipline black students.

The relationship with PEG has been costly for the St. Paul district, in more ways than one.

According to information provided by the district to EAGnews through a freedom of information request, St. Paul schools spent at least the following amounts on PEG consultations services over the past five years:

* $137,720 in 2010-11,
* $366,800 in 2011-12,
* $598,900 in 2012-13,
* $489,150 in 2013-14 and
* $285,895 in 2014-15.

The district also reported spending “matched amounts” of $132,072 (2010-11), $363,260 (2011-12) and $537,900 (2012-13) on PEG, without explaining what that term means.

Not long after PEG started working with St. Paul school officials, crucial policy changes were made, according to various news reports.

Special needs students with behavioral issues were mainstreamed into regular classrooms, a position openly advocated by PEG.

Student suspensions were replaced by “time outs,” and school officials starting forgiving or ignoring violence and other unacceptable behavior, according to various sources.

“The disciplinary changes came out of meetings with an organization called Pacific Educational Group, a San Francisco-based operation that has been consulting with the district dating back to 2010,” the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

The result has been general chaos throughout the district, with far too many students out of control because they know there are no real consequences for their actions.

A local publication called CityPages recently told the story of Becky McQueen, an educator at St. Paul’s Harding High School.

“Last spring, when she stepped into a fight between two basketball players, one grabbed her shoulder and head, throwing her aside,” the CityPages article explained. “The kid was only sent home for a couple of days.

“In March, when a student barged into her class, McQueen happened to be standing in the doorway and got crushed into a shelf. The following week, two boys came storming in, hit a girl in the head, then skipped back out. One of them had already been written up more than 30 times.

“Yet another student who repeatedly drops into her class has hit kids and cursed at an aide, once telling McQueen he would “fry” her ass. She tried to make a joke of it — ‘Ooh, I could use a little weight loss.’ Her students interjected: ‘No, that means he’s gonna kill you.'”

McQueen now has her students use a secret knock on the classroom door, so she will know who to allow in, the article said.


“There are those that believe that by suspending kids we are building a pipeline to prison. I think that by not, we are,” McQueen told CityPages. “I think we’re telling these kids you don’t have to be on time for anything, we’re just going to talk to you. You can assault somebody and we’re gonna let you come back here.”

There are similar horror stories from many other school buildings in the district, according to CityPages:

At John A. Johnson Elementary on the East Side, several teachers, who asked to remain anonymous, describe anything but a learning environment. Students run up and down the hallways, slamming lockers and tearing posters off the walls. They hit and swear at each other, upend garbage cans under teachers’ noses.

Nine teachers at Ramsey Middle School have quit since the beginning of this school year. Some left for other districts. Others couldn’t withstand the escalating anarchy.

In mid-April, staff at Battle Creek Elementary penned a letter to their principal over “concerns about building wide safety, both physical and emotional, as well as the deteriorating learning environment.”

A week later, the principal announced that he would be transferred next year.

One despondent teacher told CityPages, “We have students who will spend an hour in the hallway just running and hiding from people, like it’s a game for them. A lot of them know no one is going to stop them, so they just continue.”

The families of the district have clearly had enough.

Over the past four years, as PEG has cast its influence in St. Paul, the number of students living in the district but attending non-district schools, has increased from about 9,000 to 12,000, according to Joe Nathan, executive director of the Minneapolis-based Center for School Change.

Two-thirds of those students come from low income families, or families of color, so it’s not just a typical case of “white flight,” Nathan said.

“The most basic thing our schools must offer is the safety of the children,” Nathan told the Star Tribune. “A significant number of families are saying their children do not feel safe in the schools. They don’t feel safe even going to the bathroom.”

The situation came to a head in April when members of the St. Paul Federation of Teachers, who organized under the name “Caucus for Change,” convinced the powerful Democratic Farm Labor Party to withhold its endorsement from three incumbent school board members who had planned to seek another term in the November election.

The three, who have supported the superintendent’s relaxed disciplinary policies, will reportedly not run without the party endorsement. The party has endorsed four new candidates to fill the upcoming vacancies on the board.

That means the St. Paul school district will likely have four new members on its seven member school board, and perhaps the new majority will do something to restore discipline, order and sanity to the schools.

But what about the district’s relationship with PEG? Will officials continue to waste taxpayer dollars on an organization that pushes policies that destroy any hope for creating or maintaining a productive learning environment?

As one recently published story on better-ed.org put it, “Given the recent (and probably ongoing) turmoil in St. Paul Public Schools, it’s time to ask questions about Pacific Educational Group.”
 

Lily

Looking Up
The schools are in total chaos, everyone grasping at straws trying to figure out the social problems in schools. It all began when they kicked God out, but no one will understand that. They are slaves to their humanistic beliefs and it's leading them into a maze that they'll never find the way out.
 

livin_in_the_Son

Well-Known Member
What just chaps my lips is the simple fact that people are insisting for stricter gun laws in order to try to prevent school shootings, and yet they completely ignore disciplinary problems with the students, and lack of control by school administrators.

Children need, and thrive, on set boundaries, and consequences. Any parent will tell you that to allow a child free reign is simply asking for trouble.

More and more, as articles get posted to this site, I'm finding myself in complete and utter awe that half of this stuff is happening,... I would ask what was wrong with our country, but sadly I know all too well what is the problem. It's almost as if the majority of the citizens have been possessed, or even hypnotized en masse.
 

Heistheway

Well-Known Member
Boy are we showing our arrogance! The "natural order" of society always produces cultural variances. Our societal norms don't fair very well in the middle east. But we could, start moving there, out producing children of the indigent population, and in 4 or 5 generations change the order over there. That is exactly has NOT happened to the African immigrants and their decedents.

We have had a preponderance of European culture in this country. This has of late been re-branded as White Privilege. That sounds more accusatory than cultural dominance, don't you think? I wouldn't want to abandon my norms to adopt those of another society, unless I chose to live among them. (And I won't do that)

So we now try to "equalize" those differences by politically correct pronouncements, which produce ground swell programs to coerce adoption. Until such time as that fails to win the day, then we work on getting laws passed to deal with the variances. I for one am more than tired of this.
 

UCT

Well-Known Member
Dreading my Intro to Ethics class in the fall (which discusses morals...yeah, not ethics); it and Criminal Justice 200 both deal with so-called 'white privilege'.



Me too.

Some advice on your "morals" class. I had an ethics course. The night of the final, the professor was just smiling and as happy as could be. We all knew her final exam was historically tough. At our first break, a group of us walked down to the cappuccino machine. I put in my dollar and the machine would not accept it. It still gave me the drin though.... The next person tried with the same result. Free Cappuccino all night! Nearly everyone in the class did this. At the 2nd break, we all did it again. After all, who doesn't like free Cappuccino and the school was killing us on tuition anyway, right? Well, no. After everyone had finished their test, the professor closed the door. She said "I could fail you all right now. Each one of you has taken advantage of the "free" drinks in the break room, several of you have been there multiple times. What you did was steal. Not from the University, but from the man who owns the vending machines and is trying to make an honest living." Talk about feeling bad..... Turns out, she had this planned and the drinks were paid for by the University. It was her final ethics lesson, a real life lesson. What seemed so innocent would have cost this guy about $100 in lost income. It sounds pretty lame, but it truly makes you think. We had assumed the machine was owned by the University, or by a big company who ran thousands of them. Nope. It was one man. A man with family. A man we had just literally robbed. It's a dumb story, but a true one and one that has always made me think before doing things I "assume" are correct. You can learn a lot in a morals or ethics course. : )
 

Círeth

Well-Known Member
Some advice on your "morals" class. I had an ethics course. The night of the final, the professor was just smiling and as happy as could be. We all knew her final exam was historically tough. At our first break, a group of us walked down to the cappuccino machine. I put in my dollar and the machine would not accept it. It still gave me the drin though.... The next person tried with the same result. Free Cappuccino all night! Nearly everyone in the class did this. At the 2nd break, we all did it again. After all, who doesn't like free Cappuccino and the school was killing us on tuition anyway, right? Well, no. After everyone had finished their test, the professor closed the door. She said "I could fail you all right now. Each one of you has taken advantage of the "free" drinks in the break room, several of you have been there multiple times. What you did was steal. Not from the University, but from the man who owns the vending machines and is trying to make an honest living." Talk about feeling bad..... Turns out, she had this planned and the drinks were paid for by the University. It was her final ethics lesson, a real life lesson. What seemed so innocent would have cost this guy about $100 in lost income. It sounds pretty lame, but it truly makes you think. We had assumed the machine was owned by the University, or by a big company who ran thousands of them. Nope. It was one man. A man with family. A man we had just literally robbed. It's a dumb story, but a true one and one that has always made me think before doing things I "assume" are correct. You can learn a lot in a morals or ethics course. : )
That was a real ethics lesson. Kudos to your teacher. I'm not so sure real ethics lessons exist any more.
 

livin_in_the_Son

Well-Known Member
Some advice on your "morals" class. I had an ethics course. The night of the final, the professor was just smiling and as happy as could be. We all knew her final exam was historically tough. At our first break, a group of us walked down to the cappuccino machine. I put in my dollar and the machine would not accept it. It still gave me the drin though.... The next person tried with the same result. Free Cappuccino all night! Nearly everyone in the class did this. At the 2nd break, we all did it again. After all, who doesn't like free Cappuccino and the school was killing us on tuition anyway, right? Well, no. After everyone had finished their test, the professor closed the door. She said "I could fail you all right now. Each one of you has taken advantage of the "free" drinks in the break room, several of you have been there multiple times. What you did was steal. Not from the University, but from the man who owns the vending machines and is trying to make an honest living." Talk about feeling bad..... Turns out, she had this planned and the drinks were paid for by the University. It was her final ethics lesson, a real life lesson. What seemed so innocent would have cost this guy about $100 in lost income. It sounds pretty lame, but it truly makes you think. We had assumed the machine was owned by the University, or by a big company who ran thousands of them. Nope. It was one man. A man with family. A man we had just literally robbed. It's a dumb story, but a true one and one that has always made me think before doing things I "assume" are correct. You can learn a lot in a morals or ethics course. : )
I had something like this happen at the local grocery store... we went to the self-check out and there was $40 sticking out of the change thingy. Max wanted to keep it because we are notoriously low on money, and food is where we skimp. He even said that it was a blessing from God. Poor kid. I had to remind him that it was stealing, and NOT from God. Cashiers can lose their jobs for their tills being short, or over. The one I worked at fired for just $5.

There's no such thing as a free lunch. Someone somewhere will suffer when people assume that something that costs money is suddenly free.
 

Hol

Worships Him
Real Life Lessons became extinct on campus after a brief foray into the hinterlands of Political Correctness whilst searching for Common Sense. Neither have been seen since.
:pray for you!

Sad that things like ethics are not as simple & straight forward as they used to be.

BTW Pepples, I wanted to get your ideas on an article I posted from Hal Lindsey report on police obeying orders to harass political opponents. The thread is in the forums under current politics. It is appalling and I ask myself how these law enforcement agents got brainwashed to obey in blatant unlawful manners?
 
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