Southern California winds threaten trees and power lines

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
Winds whipped through swaths of Southern California on Saturday, prompting forecasters to warn of downed trees and power lines.

In the Los Angeles area, the strongest winds were blowing in the Santa Clarita and northern San Fernando valleys, where gusts were reaching 50 mph Saturday morning, while West Los Angeles was recording gusts of 30 to 35 mph, said Mike Wofford, meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Oxnard. The winds were expected to pick up slightly throughout the day, with isolated gusts of 65 mph possible in some mountain areas, but largely confined to western L.A. County, he said.

Already by Saturday morning a tree had fallen onto two vehicles in the 1100 block of Beverly Drive, briefly blocking the street before crews cleared it, said Brian Humphrey of the Los Angeles Fire Department. No injuries were reported.

Scattered power outages were reported throughout L.A. County, particularly on the Westside. As of 1 p.m. Saturday, about 3,179 of Southern California Edison’s 5 million customers remained without power, with 1,755 in L.A. County and the bulk of the remainder in Riverside, San Bernardino, Tulare and Ventura counties. More than 2,100 Los Angeles Department of Power and Water customers also were without power, the majority of them in Hollywood and Del Rey.

Wind advisories were posted from 3 p.m. Saturday until 3 p.m. Sunday for the L.A. County mountains, coastal areas and most valleys, as well as the Ventura County valleys and mountains, with the weather service warning the conditions could pose challenges to those driving high-profile vehicles along Highway 101, the 210 and 405 freeways and many canyon roads. A wind advisory was also in effect for the Santa Barbara County mountains and South Coast until 3 a.m. Sunday and in the Antelope Valley until 9 p.m. Saturday.

Forecasters said the fire danger posed by the winds would be mitigated by Saturday’s high humidity, although that was expected to change Sunday as conditions dried out. A light rain was falling along the northern edge of Los Angeles County and the Interstate 5 corridor in the Gorman area Saturday morning. Those areas could also see light snow, with snow levels dropping to 5,000 feet, but not significant enough to cause travel issues, Wofford said.

The breezy weather was being caused by a low pressure system moving through Northern California and into Nevada that set up a typical scenario, that sends north winds through the San Joaquin Valley and down into coastal areas, Wofford said.

As the low pressure system moves farther toward the east Sunday, the winds are expected to shift with it, becoming warmer and drier as they blow offshore, he said.

“Then it becomes more like a traditional northeast Santa Ana wind, which doesn’t really typically get much wind into West L.A., but more like the Santa Monica Mountains, Malibu and the San Fernando Valley,” he said.

As is typical with Santa Anas, Sunday’s winds were expected to be strongest between 4 a.m. and 2 p.m., before the arrival of onshore breezes later in the afternoon, Wofford said.

Temperatures were expected to start to warm up Sunday and then reach about 10 degrees above normal by Monday, with many areas seeing highs of 75 to 80 degrees, Wofford said.

The risk of fire was expected to be elevated Sunday due to the windy, warm and dry conditions, but not extreme enough to draw a red-flag warning from the weather service.

Still, Humphrey said, there’s been little rain and vegetation is dry, so fire officials are asking people to take extra care to avoid generating sparks and to take a moment to survey their property and check for hazards.

“The fire weather danger rating has inched into the high phase,” he said. “And for February, that’s not unheard of but it’s relatively uncommon.”
https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2021-02-20/winds-whip-through-los-angeles-area
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
These final words in this article is why I posted it.
“The fire weather danger rating has inched into the high phase,” he said. “And for February, that’s not unheard of but it’s relatively uncommon.”

The way the weather has been so out of the “norm” everywhere, these winds we are having gives me the creeps. This area is known for Santa Ana Winds and for those in this forum who are from Southern California are familiar with them. The Santa Ana’s are called the “Devil Winds” and there’s a reason for it. They are very destructive winds likened to mini tornadoes. They topple big rigs like little matchbox cars. I live in an area called the Cajon Pass and those winds whip through here like a maddened Tornado. When my daughter was a small child she couldn’t walk to school during these winds because she would literally be lifted off her feet and blown over. She must have been six at the time and very small framed so you can imagine.

I’ve been hearing of many states being afflicted with one sort of bad weather conditions or another but many going through devastating damage from weather related conditions. California can’t be exempt I’m sure so I am watching @chaser reporting the earthquake activity daily. As for Southern California on top of the quaking every day from 1 magnitude to at least a 4, those winds I’m talking about have been more common lately, very unseasonable appearance of them. As I began this post, the last sentence in the article speaks of these winds as “not unheard of but uncommon”. Last night I woke up to the roaring sound of those winds and I thought of all these things I’m posting here. They are still blowing strong but tapered down some. My thought is what does it mean for these Santa Ana’s to be blowing in their out of norm way and believe me they arent regular winds like you may think if you aren’t familiar with these devil winds and the damage they do.
Very weird weather indeed.
 
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alisani

Well-Known Member
These final words in this article is why I posted it.
“The fire weather danger rating has inched into the high phase,” he said. “And for February, that’s not unheard of but it’s relatively uncommon.”

The way the weather has been so out of the “norm” everywhere, these winds we are having gives me the creeps. This area is known for Santa Ana Winds and for those in this forum who are from Southern California are familiar with them. The Santa Ana’s are called the “Devil Winds” and there’s a reason for it. They are very destructive winds likened to mini tornadoes. They topple big rigs like little matchbox cars. I live in an area called the Cajon Pass and those winds whip through here like a maddened Tornado. When my daughter was a small child she couldn’t walk to school during these winds because she would literally be lifted off her feet and blown over. She must have been six at the time and very small framed so you can imagine.

I’ve been hearing of many states being afflicted with one sort of bad weather conditions or another but many going through devastating damage from weather related conditions. California can’t be exempt I’m sure so I am watching @chaser reporting the earthquake activity daily. As for Southern California on top of the quaking every day from 1 magnitude to at least a 4, those winds I’m talking about have been more common lately, very unseasonable appearance of them. As I began this post, the last sentence in the article speaks of these winds as “not unheard of but uncommon”. Last night I woke up to the roaring sound of those winds and I thought of all these things I’m posting here. They are still blowing strong but tapered down some. My thought is what does it mean for these Santa Ana’s to be blowing in their out of norm way and believe me they arent regular winds like you may think if you aren’t familiar with these devil winds and the damage they do.
Very weird weather indeed.
Do these winds create dust clouds or dust storms?
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
So what are Santa Ana Winds and why the fuss Southern California residents make over them?

Santa Ana winds are known for the hot, dry weather that they bring in autumn (often the hottest of the year), but they can also arise at other times of the year.[1] They often bring the lowest relative humidities of the year to coastal Southern California. These low humidities, combined with the warm, compressionally-heated air mass, plus high wind speeds, create critical fire weather conditions. Also sometimes called "devil winds",[2][3] the Santa Anas are infamous for fanning regional wildfires.

Historical impact[edit]​

The Santa Ana winds and the accompanying raging wildfires have been a part of the ecosystem of the Los Angeles Basin for over 5,000 years, dating back to the earliest habitation of the region by the Tongva and Tataviam peoples.[18]

The Santa Ana winds have been recognized and reported in English-language records as a weather phenomenon in Southern California since at least the mid-nineteenth century.[2] Various episodes of hot, dry winds have been described over this history as dust storms, hurricane-force winds, and violent north-easters, damaging houses and destroying fruit orchards. Newspaper archives have many photographs of regional damage dating back to the beginnings of news reporting in Los Angeles. When the Los Angeles Basin was primarily an agricultural region, the winds were feared particularly by farmers for their potential to destroy crops.[2]

The winds are also associated with some of the area's largest and deadliest wildfires, including some of the state's largest and deadliest fires on record, the Camp fire, Thomas Fire, and Cedar Fire, as well as the Laguna Fire, Old Fire, Esperanza Fire, Santiago Canyon Fire of 1889 and the Witch Creek Fire.

In October 2007, the winds fueled major wild fires and house burnings in Escondido, Malibu, Rainbow, San Marcos, Carlsbad, Rancho Bernardo, Poway, Ramona, and in the major cities of San Bernardino, San Diego and Los Angeles. The Santa Ana winds were also a factor in the November 2008 California wildfires.

In early December 2011, the Santa Ana winds were the strongest yet recorded. An atmospheric set-up occurred that allowed the towns of Pasadena and Altadena in the San Gabriel Valley to get whipped by sustained winds at 97 mph (156 km/h), and gusts up to 167 mph (269 km/h).[19] The winds toppled thousands of trees, knocking out power for over a week. Schools were closed, and a "state of emergency" was declared. The winds grounded planes at LAX, destroyed homes, and were even strong enough to snap a concrete stop light from its foundation.[20] The winds also ripped through Mammoth Mountain and parts of Utah. Mammoth Mountain experienced a near-record wind gust of 175 mph (282 km/h), on December 1, 2011.[19]

In May 2014, the Santa Ana winds initiated the May 2014 San Diego County wildfires, approximately four months after the Colby Fire in northern Los Angeles County.

In December 2017, a cluster of twenty-five Southern California wildfires were exacerbated by long-lasting and strong Santa Ana winds.

In September 2020, a group of wildfires in Southern California were exacerbated by a mild Santa Ana event, including the Valley Fire, El Dorado Fire, and Bobcat Fire.

In October 2020, the Silverado Fire (Irvine, California) was exacerbated by severe Santa Ana winds.[21]

for complete history of SA winds:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Ana_winds
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
That has got to feel spooky, to see them in action.
Now this is spooky,

The most well-accepted explanation for the name Santa Ana winds is that it is derived from the Santa Ana Canyon in Orange County, one of the many locations the winds blow intensely.[2][5]Newspaper references to the name Santa Ana winds date as far back as 1882.[29]

By 1893, controversy had broken out[citation needed] over whether this name was a corruption of the Spanish term Santana (a running together of the words Santa Ana), or the different term Satanás, meaning Satan. However, newspaper mention of the term "Satanás" in reference to the winds did not begin appearing until more than 60 years later. A possible explanation is that the spoken Spanish language merges two identical vowels in elision, when one ends a word and the other begins the next word. Thus the Spanish pronunciation of the phrase "Santa Ana" sounds like "Santana".

Another attempt at explanation of the name claims that it derives from a Native American term for "devil wind" that was altered by the Spanish into the form "Satanás" (meaning Satan), and then later corrupted into "Santa Ana". However, an authority on Native American language claims this term "Santana" never existed in that tongue.[5]

Another derivation favored by the late well-known KABC television meteorologist, Dr. George Fischbeck, cited the etymology of the Santana winds as coming from the early Mexicano/Angeleno: "Caliente aliento de Satanás" or "hot breath of Satan". This is likely a false etymology or folk etymology, though.[according to whom?]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Ana_winds
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
When I was growing up in Southern California when The Santa Ana winds came we love them. It was fun watching the tumbleweeds go by and with the wind to your back we could really fly on our bikes. Most of us also loved the super dry air that came with the winds.
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
When I was growing up in Southern California when The Santa Ana winds came we love them. It was fun watching the tumbleweeds go by and with the wind to your back we could really fly on our bikes. Most of us also loved the super dry air that came with the winds.
Always hated being in them with my long hair. It would wrap around my face and hard to keep out of my eyes and mouth.
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
Now this is spooky,

The most well-accepted explanation for the name Santa Ana winds is that it is derived from the Santa Ana Canyon in Orange County, one of the many locations the winds blow intensely.[2][5]Newspaper references to the name Santa Ana winds date as far back as 1882.[29]

By 1893, controversy had broken out[citation needed] over whether this name was a corruption of the Spanish term Santana (a running together of the words Santa Ana), or the different term Satanás, meaning Satan. However, newspaper mention of the term "Satanás" in reference to the winds did not begin appearing until more than 60 years later. A possible explanation is that the spoken Spanish language merges two identical vowels in elision, when one ends a word and the other begins the next word. Thus the Spanish pronunciation of the phrase "Santa Ana" sounds like "Santana".

Another attempt at explanation of the name claims that it derives from a Native American term for "devil wind" that was altered by the Spanish into the form "Satanás" (meaning Satan), and then later corrupted into "Santa Ana". However, an authority on Native American language claims this term "Santana" never existed in that tongue.[5]

Another derivation favored by the late well-known KABC television meteorologist, Dr. George Fischbeck, cited the etymology of the Santana winds as coming from the early Mexicano/Angeleno: "Caliente aliento de Satanás" or "hot breath of Satan". This is likely a false etymology or folk etymology, though.[according to whom?]
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santa_Ana_winds
Honestly I think the derived explanation for the name comes with the destructive nature of these winds. I really don’t think the devil has any relevance to them any more than hurricanes or Tornadoes or earthquakes. They are all destructive
”natural disasters “.
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
The winds died down a bit since the initial post last Monday which were from Monday and Tuesday of gusts. They returned on Wednesday night and blew through Thursday and sounded like a high speed roller coaster and had the big trees swaying their branches like they were a strand of hair. Here’s an article on the latest gusts

California Buffeted by Strong Offshore Winds

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Strong winds swept out of the interior of California and out to sea early Thursday, fanning small fires and toppling big rigs.
At least five trucks were blown over on interstates in the inland region east of Los Angeles, KNX news radio reported.

Three homes were damaged or destroyed by wind-driven flames in the small San Bernardino County community of Bloomington and firefighters were patrolling the neighborhood to look for hotspots, KABC-TV reported.

Los Angeles firefighters held a brush fire to under 2 acres (0.8 hectare) in the northeastern San Fernando Valley.
Gusts ranged up to 80 mph (129 kph) in Southern California’s mountains, the National Weather Service said.

The COVID-19 mass vaccination site at Disneyland was shut down due to the winds, Orange County Supervisor Lisa A. Bartlett said in a tweet.
Winds also swept through the San Francisco Bay region as strong surface high pressure over the Great Basin and lower pressure along the California coast set up “ideal offshore flow” that ushered in a very dry airmass, the weather service said.

Gusts in the north and east bay areas ranged from 65 mph to 80 mph (104.6 kph to 128.7 kph) at upper elevations and windspeeds at lower elevations ranged from 30 mph to 50 mph (48 kph to 80 kph).
https://www.usnews.com/news/best-st.../california-buffeted-by-strong-offshore-winds
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
They are at it again! Those Santa Ana’s are ripping and whirling out there. My goodness they are Fierce. Kind of scary sounding. A lot of stuff being blown about outside. Praying over our home and safety. Those winds aren’t playing around. Praying no fires get started and cause a worse problem.
 
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