Severe weather threat for 59 million, dangerous heat for West heading into Labor Day weekend

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
By Janice Dean, Travis Fedschun | Fox News
A disturbance heading east may trigger severe thunderstorms for millions on Thursday as record-setting heat will settle in over the West for the holiday weekend.
Scattered storms could turn severe over the Mid-Atlantic by Thursday afternoon.
Large hail, damaging winds and isolated tornadoes along with heavy rain will be possible.
The Storm Prediction Center (SPC) said there's an enhanced risk of severe weather across the region, with a particular concern for damaging winds and a few tornadoes.
Some 59 million Americans may see severe weather on Thursday, with over 9 million in the "enhanced" area, according to the SPC.

Cities such as Baltimore, Washington D.C., Philadelphia, and up toward New York City, may see storms develop throughout the day.

In the nation's midsection, heavy rain with the risk of flash flooding continues for areas over the Central and Southern Plains.
Some rainfall rates could reach two inches per hour in isolated spots.
Flash flood warnings and watches are in effect throughout the region.
Extreme heat returns to the West through the Labor Day holiday weekend.
Dangerous temperatures and dry conditions will be unbearable in some areas, running 20 to 25 degrees above average.

Many areas across the Southwest will see temperatures soar well over 100 degrees Fahrenheit.
Meanwhile, a cold front dropping into the Midwest and Great Lakes will bring cooler, drier weather for the region over the weekend.
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
:pray ing for this weekend and for you Lovin.

:pray
The weather is and has been crazy. Not just here in California with the extreme heat but there’s also bad storm weather forming at the east coast again that is supposed to likely be hurricane weather sometime in the next few days.It’s hurricane season but the recent hurricanes have been devastating. Praying for everyone who would be affected by all of the bad weather. I posted here the title of the thread I posted about the coming hurricanes below if you want to get information about it. Praying for everyone’s safety.

Hurricane center monitoring 'quartet of systems,' disturbance could form off East Coast
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
10:00 pm still 85 degrees. Still feels pretty warm here. Everything is going. Cooler, the fans, and still yuk and uncomfortable.
My sister lives in Tacoma, WA and right now it’s 62 degrees there. What a difference 20 degrees makes
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
California’s ‘brutal’ heat wave is
One way to look at how volatile the fire weather conditions are in California, and how the upcoming heat wave could put parts of the state back in peril is through a metric that effectively measures the thirst of the atmosphere, known as the Evaporative Demand Drought Index.

This index shows the ability of the atmosphere to dry out the landscape through high temperatures, clear skies, low humidity levels and other ways. It is a reliable indicator for fire danger — the higher the index, the greater the fire threat.

This summer, the EDDI has consistently been in its highest drought category, E4, over parts of California, a level that can be expected only 2 percent of the time based on records going back to 1980. Now, with a potentially historic heat wave descending this weekend over California and the Pacific Northwest, those drying effects will only intensify, pulling more moisture from plants and soils.

Scientists with the U.S. Forest Service and Cal Fire, which is California’s state firefighting agency, have seen evidence of high stress on vegetation in the last few months. Conditions have reached record dry levels periodically and then recovered during cooler, more humid intervals.

Shrubs and tree canopies, for example, are running drier this summer than they were in 2018, California’s worst fire season on record when multiple megafires burned nearly 2 million acres. That level of dryness in live trees allows fires to spread into canopies, burning hotter with “extreme fire behavior” that can be impossible for firefighters to control.

The mid-August heat wave resulted in rolling blackouts for parts of the state due in part to a lack of planning for the spike in electricity demand. The California Independent System Operator (ISO), which helps oversee the operation of the electric grid in the state, has issued a “Flex Alert” for the state starting Saturday and lasting through Monday, calling on residents to take steps to conserve power

“Conservation can lower demand and avoid further actions, including outages, and lessen the duration of possible power interruptions,” the ISO stated.


One way to look at how volatile the fire weather conditions are in California, and how the upcoming heat wave could put parts of the state back in peril is through a metric that effectively measures the thirst of the atmosphere, known as the Evaporative Demand Drought Index.

This index shows the ability of the atmosphere to dry out the landscape through high temperatures, clear skies, low humidity levels and other ways. It is a reliable indicator for fire danger — the higher the index, the greater the fire threat.

This summer, the EDDI has consistently been in its highest drought category, E4, over parts of California, a level that can be expected only 2 percent of the time based on records going back to 1980. Now, with a potentially historic heat wave descending this weekend over California and the Pacific Northwest, those drying effects will only intensify, pulling more moisture from plants and soils.

Scientists with the U.S. Forest Service and Cal Fire, which is California’s state firefighting agency, have seen evidence of high stress on vegetation in the last few months. Conditions have reached record dry levels periodically and then recovered during cooler, more humid intervals.

Shrubs and tree canopies, for example, are running drier this summer than they were in 2018, California’s worst fire season on record when multiple megafires burned nearly 2 million acres. That level of dryness in live trees allows fires to spread into canopies, burning hotter with “extreme fire behavior” that can be impossible for firefighters to control.

The mid-August heat wave resulted in rolling blackouts for parts of the state due in part to a lack of planning for the spike in electricity demand. The California Independent System Operator (ISO), which helps oversee the operation of the electric grid in the state, has issued a “Flex Alert” for the state starting Saturday and lasting through Monday, calling on residents to take steps to conserve power

“Conservation can lower demand and avoid further actions, including outages, and lessen the duration of possible power interruptions,” the ISO stated.


, expected to topple all-time records, escalate fire risks
With California’s second, third and fourth-largest wildfires on record still actively burning, a searing heat wave beginning Friday threatens to set back firefighting efforts, lead to potential rolling electricity service blackouts and smash all-time temperature records throughout the state. Heat warnings and advisories are also in effect for parts of Arizona, Nevada and Oregon.

The heat wave is forecast to be even more intense than an extreme event in mid-August that played a key role in contributing to the massive blazes that have burned 1.5 million acres so far — raising a new term, the “gigafire” — concentrated around the San Francisco Bay area.

Studies show that human-caused climate change are tilting the odds in favor of more frequent, severe and longer lasting heat waves, as well as larger wildfires throughout large parts of the West. New research published last month, for example, shows climate change is tied to more frequent occurrences of extreme fire risk days in parts of California during the fall (meteorologists define the fall as beginning The National Weather Service (NWS) is not pulling any punches when it comes to the magnitude and health threats posed by the hot weather, calling the next four days “brutally hot.” .Extreme heat has been the top weather-related killer in the United States during the past 30 years, and combined with poor air quality from nearby fires as well as the coronavirus epidemic, the health threat is particularly acute. Air-conditioning provides the best protection from excessive heat but, rather than risking exposure to the virus at cooling shelters, the pandemic may keep people who lack air-conditioning at home.

Extreme heat has been the top weather-related killer in the United States during the past 30 years, and combined with poor air quality from nearby fires as well as the coronavirus epidemic, the health threat is particularly acute. Air-conditioning provides the best protection from excessive heat but, rather than risking exposure to the virus at cooling shelters, the pandemic may keep people who lack air-conditioning at home.
The two hottest days in Southern California, including Los Angeles, are expected to be Saturday and Sunday, with the potential for some locations to set records for the hottest temperature ever recorded in any month during this period, the National Weather Service (NWS) said in a forecast discussion posted online.
The two hottest days in Southern California, including Los Angeles, are expected to be Saturday and Sunday, with the potential for some locations to set records for the hottest temperature ever recorded in any month during this period, the National Weather Service (NWS) said in a forecast discussion posted online.

On Sunday, Weather Service

forecasters are expecting an extremely rare number of the heat dome strength to show up over Southern California: 598.

That describes the height in dekameters, or tens of meters, that the halfway point of the atmosphere’s mass is above the surface. When air warms, it expands. When it cools, a volume of air shrinks. An air mass this hot expands a lot, causing a column of air to grow and raising the atmosphere’s halfway point. With this particular system, that level is 5,980 meters — or about 19,000 feet — above the surface. Elsewhere across the western U.S., the number will be higher, at or above 6,000 meters, or about 19,700 feet, above the surface.

This 6,000-meter level “represents a threshold that is coincident with record heat over the Western United States,” wrote Ryan Maue, a meteorologist who operates the website weathermodels.com, in a Twitter message.

Instances of heat domes exceeding this 6,000-meter level used to be rare but have increased dramatically in recent years, a trend some meteorologists link to human-caused climate change.

Maue examined data back to 1958 and found almost all of the high-powered heat domes have occurred since 1983 — with the overwhelming majority of them occurring since 1990.

“[T]he 6000-meter club “heat domes” are certainly becoming more frequent b/c of climate change, now a nearly annual occurrence,” he wrote in a Twitter message.

One of the factors that will heighten temperatures in parts of California this weekend will be gusty, dry offshore winds which will blow from higher elevations toward the coast, compressing and heating up as it does so. This will cancel out any cooling influence from the typical sea breezes that Los Angeles and nearby areas enjoy.

Temperatures on Sunday are forecast to be about 20 degrees above average across the Los Angeles area, with temperatures reaching the triple digits all the way to the coast. Temperatures in the 100s will also encroach on San Francisco, with only minor relief from the typical cooling winds off the Pacific confined to areas right along the immediate shore.

In Sacramento, the NWS is forecasting a high of 102 degrees on Saturday, and 110 on Sunday.
Wildfire woes to continue
Offshore winds would also raise wildfire risks, and on Monday, strong winds in inland areas out of the north could bring critical wildfire weather conditions. While the intense heat may only last through Monday in coastal areas, valley locations and inland reaches of Southern California are still predicted to see scorching heat and high fire danger well into the week next week.

The wildfire threat may also spike early next week in Northern California, with the NWS in San Francisco warning of “[a] possible early season offshore wind event” Monday night into Tuesday morning that would also push smoke from ongoing fires back into the Bay Area. The smoke may keep temperatures slightly cooler in some areas by absorbing some of the incoming solar radiation, the NWS said.

The weather pattern early next week may feature a dip or trough in the jet stream over the Great Basin and Rocky Mountain region, with snow falling across Colorado. Such a pattern typically sets up in October, causing offshore wind events that can cause some of California’s worst wildfire outbreaks.

A fire weather watch is in effect across areas of Northern California from Monday evening through Wednesday morning for critical fire weather conditions due to extremely low humidity and gusty winds of up to 50 miles per hour.

Forecasters are also warily watching this weather pattern for enhancing ongoing fire activity in Northern California and causing offshore Santa Ana winds to kick in across Southern California.
One way to look at how volatile the fire weather conditions are in California, and how the upcoming heat wave could put parts of the state back in peril is through a metric that effectively measures the thirst of the atmosphere, known as the Evaporative Demand Drought Index.

This index shows the ability of the atmosphere to dry out the landscape through high temperatures, clear skies, low humidity levels and other ways. It is a reliable indicator for fire danger — the higher the index, the greater the fire threat.

This summer, the EDDI has consistently been in its highest drought category, E4, over parts of California, a level that can be expected only 2 percent of the time based on records going back to 1980. Now, with a potentially historic heat wave descending this weekend over California and the Pacific Northwest, those drying effects will only intensify, pulling more moisture from plants and soils.

Scientists with the U.S. Forest Service and Cal Fire, which is California’s state firefighting agency, have seen evidence of high stress on vegetation in the last few months. Conditions have reached record dry levels periodically and then recovered during cooler, more humid intervals.

Shrubs and tree canopies, for example, are running drier this summer than they were in 2018, California’s worst fire season on record when multiple megafires burned nearly 2 million acres. That level of dryness in live trees allows fires to spread into canopies, burning hotter with “extreme fire behavior” that can be impossible for firefighters to control.

The mid-August heat wave resulted in rolling blackouts for parts of the state due in part to a lack of planning for the spike in electricity demand. The California Independent System Operator (ISO), which helps oversee the operation of the electric grid in the state, has issued a “Flex Alert” for the state starting Saturday and lasting through Monday, calling on residents to take steps to conserve power

“Conservation can lower demand and avoid further actions, including outages, and lessen the duration of possible power interruptions,” the ISO stated.
 

Annie

Be A Berean!
10:00 pm still 85 degrees. Still feels pretty warm here. Everything is going. Cooler, the fans, and still yuk and uncomfortable.
My sister lives in Tacoma, WA and right now it’s 62 degrees there. What a difference 20 degrees makes

Tacoma, much cooler in the coastal area....... I never cared for the rain when I lived in Bellevue but right now it sounds pretty good :smile2
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
115!? ........ I hope you have a good AC or way to keep cool :pray:pray

It was 95 here yesterday........ today it's not as hot, overcast and breezy
We've got the swamp cooler on high and fans going in all the bedrooms. Still not comfortable inside. Brought in the dogs. Last heatwave our jack russell terrier fell over on her side outside because it was so hot. I'm in the Inland Empire in Southern California it gets real hot here but this year is the worst I've ever felt. Like even with the numbers in degrees it feels hotter than that. Like it's a different heat.aybe due to higher humidity than usual
 

Annie

Be A Berean!
I took an early morning shower Friday which cooled me off for most of the day. It's unseasonably hot here too.
There's always the wear a wet shirt or wet your hair down and sit in front of the fan/AC if you can't get cool but you've probably tried that.
Are you anywhere near Escondido? I remember how humid it got there.
I like to take our small dogs with me in the car when I go out but it's too hot for them there if I have to go into a store to shop.
 
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Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
I took an early morning shower Friday which cooled me off for most of the day. It's unseasonably hot here too.
There's always the wear a wet shirt or wet your hair down if you can't get cool but you've probably tried that.
Are you anywhere near Escondido? I remember how humid it got there.
I like to take our small dogs with me in the car when I go out but it's too hot for them there if I have to go into a store to shop.
No. I'm up more NE from there. If we were closer to the beaches it would be so nice
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
I'm about 30 miles from you and we registered 116 today.
It is beginning to drop by a half-degree now.
Last night it was 95 at 10pm............
I’m Sorry, I know you’re feeling it too. Still 115 here. It’s so hot in here I’m dizzy. Trying to drink a lot of water but hard to swallow well so not getting enough. Praying for everyone being affected by bad weather. Yeah the humidity makes it worse. Hard on my COPD. The temps here in our area are extremely high. My sisters in Washington state and they have no heat like this. Crazy. All end times situations I’m thinking
 
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Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
It's 8:00 pm and it's still 109 degrees. I don't remember it's being this high temperature at this hour before even for Summer
 

AWillow

Peace that passes all understanding.
Ive lived in LA for quite a while now and it’s always this hot in September pretty much maybe not quite as hot as 117 like it’s going to be tomorrow but it’s pretty much expected it’s pretty miserable it’s 100° right now at 8:50p. thank God for central air!
 
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