San Francisco Can’t Clean the Streets, But Will Order $20K Trash Cans

Chris

Administrator
Staff member
San Francisco Can’t Clean the Streets, But Will Order $20K Trash Cans
By Daniel Greenfield

San Francisco, the home of the men and women who fund the Democrats, is also one of the filthiest and most expensive cities in America.

There’s a good reason for that even apart from the self-inflicted homeless crisis and that reason is political corruption.

It’s a story that starts with Willie Brown’s man, Mohammed Nuru aka Mr. Clean who was in charge of cleaning up the city.

Mayor Ed Lee appointed Mohammed Nuru to head DPW in 2011. That year there had been 5,547 “human waste incidents”. By 2013, there were 8,793 human waste incidents.

A 58% increase.

Mr. Clean was hard at work on the job.

By 2016, the number of human waste incidents had tripled to 18,276.

In 2018, there had been 28,084 human waste complaints in San Francisco. Annual human waste complaints had increased 400% since Mohammed ‘Mr. Clean’ Nuru had taken over at DPW.

Fortunately, DPW had a plan.

Between 2013 and 2018, human waste incidents had increased by over 200%. But DPW had paid a public relations firm $408,745 to produce reports claiming that San Francisco was spotless.

Even as the city was drowning in trash, the PR firm gave it the highest cleanliness marks ever.


Nuru was finally busted along with a huge chunk of San Francisco’s officialdom.

Federal authorities charged San Francisco Public Works Director Mohammed Nuru and high-profile restaurateur Nick Bovis with fraud Tuesday following a public corruption probe. The schemes involved an envelope of cash, fraudulent city contracts, improper gifts from a Chinese developer and a $2,000 bottle of wine, according to authorities.

Nuru was also Mayor London Breed’s ex.

Little has actually changed in San Francisco where cleaning up means $20,000 designer trash cans.

San Francisco is hoping to replace the long despised green trash cans littered throughout the city, as its board of supervisors voted Wednesday to approve using new designer prototype bins.

However, there’s a catch: Each new can will cost between $12,000 and $20,000, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

Public Works acting Director Alaric Degrafinried agreed during the meeting Wednesday that the prototype cost is “a lot.” He said the main reason it’s so expensive is because San Francisco worked with a designer on a custom-made prototype. When mass produced, each can will cost an estimated $2,000 to $3,000, the department said Thursday. Old trash cans cost $1,218 each in 2018.


That’s not what a trash can costs at Home Depot.

In 2018, the city decided to work on a new custom designed trash can and choose San Francisco-based Advanced Prototype Engineering LLC as the industrial designer. Last year, Public Works released three finalists for sleek gray bins.

Nuru, who was charged with fraud, granted a $5.2 million trash can contract to Alternative Choice LLC, a business registered to a family member of Walter Wong, a former city contractor who pleaded guilty to fraud and money laundering. The City Attorney subpoenaed the business last year.


Meet the new boss, same as the old boss. And meanwhile San Fran only gets filthier.

https://www.raptureforums.com/polit...an-the-streets-but-will-order-20k-trash-cans/
 

Rocky Rivera

Well-Known Member
That's a lot of money in the trash! There's plenty of people looking for work; why not hire them to clean up the streets of San Francisco. I doubt you need a college degree (a piece of trash that is nowadays) to hose and sweep streets. Any able-bodied person can do this. I understand not many people might want to, but no job is beneath a person so long as it's honest work.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
I can understand a prototype being very expensive since they're just making one and it's a new design. But given that reality, it would make much better sense to investigate existing designs... after all, when spending the people's money, it should be done with care and good management. A price of $2000-$3000 for the final product seems quite extravagant.

All three prototypes look like they'd become filthy quickly and then be quite hard to clean and keep clean.
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
In 1964 I lived in a house with my parents. The house was built for $18,500.
Today San Francisco pays $4,000 for a homeless tent.
The pricey garbage cans will be stolen for scrap metal.
Given the complexity of this device, is it possible for the can to be out of order? If it can't be fixed, is it thrown in the trash?
Why not design a can that looks like R2D2? Kids would enjoy using it. When it fills up it can drive itself to the dump and empty itself.
If Nancy Pelosi calls for an Uber, could she be persuaded to get into one of these?
 

Rocky Rivera

Well-Known Member
For $2000 you can buy a very good AR-15, souped up with all the accessories -- or about two glocks and plenty of ammo. If you're an Asian living in New York or San Francisco and can't move out of the city, it's best to invest in one of those firearms. But a garbage can is only a receptacle for waste. A 32-gallon can costs only $11.00 at Walmart. With $2000 you can buy around 160 of those, taking tax into account. You can even manufacture some out of recycled aluminum. Seems as if liberals are all about heavy spending and waste so long as it's other people's money.
 

Carl

Well-Known Member
And the trash still has to be picked up off the streets and thrown into the trash cans. Then the trash cans have to be emptied. Who is going to do that? I know the people that make the mess can pick up the mess.
 

JSTyler

Well-Known Member
Isn't this the same city that was not so long ago buying wheeled trash receptacles and giving them to homeless folk to use as mobile homes? My memory may be amiss but something is ringing that bell.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
I clicked on the link labeled photos thinking I'd see trash cans with a built-in toilet: one prototype flush, another composting, and the third incinerating

I'm sooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooo disappointed :alone
 

ChildofLight

Well-Known Member
Isn't this the same city that was not so long ago buying wheeled trash receptacles and giving them to homeless folk to use as mobile homes? My memory may be amiss but something is ringing that bell.
Oh wow! Wheeled trash receptacles as mobile homes? I guess that makes these tiny homes.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Isn't this the same city that was not so long ago buying wheeled trash receptacles and giving them to homeless folk to use as mobile homes? My memory may be amiss but something is ringing that bell.

Some places put a hasp and lock large, rolling, clean, plastic trash receptacles (the kind with the attached lids), and then give them (with the key) to homeless to keep in a designated, proctored sheltered or indoor location. The receptacles are intended for homeless to have a place to store personal belongings, including clothing and bedding, so they're secure and protected from rain, etc. The receptacles are labeled and are to be stored in a systematic order within the designated location except when items are removed or deposited (in the place assigned for this in the designated location). This has freed up bus and train station lockers and airport lockers for travelers, and eliminated giant piles of wet, moldy clothes, blankets, and etc. in business dumpsters after inclement weather. Also reduced theft and robbery, and its related violence, in the homeless populations.

Some places allowed homeless people to remove their entire receptacle from the designated location, but this caused enough problems, including sanitation, that most places don't allow it anymore.
 
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