Russian Conscripts Get 19th Century Weapons

MePlus6

Well-Known Member
Can’t post the link here as it might not be approved, but read in the news today that Russian conscripts have been given rifles from the 19th century with which to fight.

They are made of a good chunk of wood.

Great stuff that could help burn for, oh I don’t know, seven years. If you know what I’m saying. :wink
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Can’t post the link here as it might not be approved, but read in the news today that Russian conscripts have been given rifles from the 19th century with which to fight.

They are made of a good chunk of wood.

Great stuff that could help burn for, oh I don’t know, seven years. If you know what I’m saying. :wink

The original article is from the Daily Mail, which has been cited by other sites. The Daily Mail is not noted for its accuracy or professionalism (being kind, here)

I still wonder where the well-equipped, well-trained, professional Russian soldiers are, and where they're going to be sent :tappingfoot

The Russian Army isn't all untrained, ill-equipped conscripts and sadistic mercenaries.

They have a LOT of AK47s and AK74s (also with wooden or plastic parts that burn)
 

Armor of Light

Praising my Savior all the day long!
I still wonder where the well-equipped, well-trained, professional Russian soldiers are, and where they're going to be sent :tappingfoot
I think many were moved into Syria a couple years ago, I remember reading and posting of news stories on Russian troop and equipment unloading everyday at ports in Syria, probably for a move against Golan in the future.
 

paul289

Well-Known Member
Mosin Nagants, I'm guessing? In WWII, the Soviets didn't have enough rifles to go around, so they'd send out 5 guys with one rifle, and when the first guy got shot, someone else would pick up the rifle. Would be interesting to see if more AKs are made with wood furniture, or if steel shortages will push them to armor vehicles with wood, or if wood-framed airplanes will make a comeback?
 

ChildofLight

Well-Known Member
Mosin Nagants, I'm guessing? In WWII, the Soviets didn't have enough rifles to go around, so they'd send out 5 guys with one rifle, and when the first guy got shot, someone else would pick up the rifle. Would be interesting to see if more AKs are made with wood furniture, or if steel shortages will push them to armor vehicles with wood, or if wood-framed airplanes will make a comeback?
Wooden Trojan horses and wooden chariots? ;)
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Since on the topic of Soldier armament . . .

In video I’ve seen, it looks and sounds like Ukrainian civilian-Soldiers have AK47 rifles. AK47 probably the most reliable military rifle ever built, except maybe Israeli Uzi. It just keeps going and going and going . . . sand, dirt, dust, snow, slush, mud, blood, crud, rain . . . easy to take apart, clean, and reassemble. In Vietnam, some American Soldiers would pick up an AK off the battlefield or in a village and used it in preference to M16 (also some other places around the world). M16 is a nice weapon, but jams far more easily, especially when dirty, and requires more frequent and detailed cleaning to remain functional. AK47 uses 7.62 mm round, less likely to be deflected by foliage than M16 5.56 round. 5.56 more likely to tumble inside a person, so more widespread and more extensive/more time-consuming-to-fix injuries. AK47 with wooden stock less likely to break than M16 plastic stock from butt-stroke/similar during hand-to-hand and/or use for destruction/opening of equipment, materiel, and doors. M16 lighter to carry. Magazine swap speed about equal, but AK is slightly easier for a lefty than M16. Both absolutely lethal weapons in the hands of a trained Soldier. M16 and AK47 contemporaneous with each other and been around for decades because good weapons. AK74 essentially an improved version of AK47. Some of the Russian Soldiers in Ukraine have AK. Not all have been issued old weapons. Ukraine currently issues AK74 to active units, and some others weapons. Various rifles and other firearms have been sent to Ukraine since before and during the Russian invasion, so Soldiers and citizen-Soldiers not uniformly armed.

Never handled a Mosin, so not familiar. Wooden, uses a 7.62 mm round (longer than AK 47 ammunition), and bolt action. The M14 rifle used by US Soldiers (and snipers even after M16 fielded) were also bolt action, so that by itself doesn’t make it a bad weapon. The Mosin ammunition is the same as is used in some current Russian sniper rifles, so there is cross-use and inventory on-hand. A huge advantage of giving a bolt action rifle to a scared, minimally trained, young recruit/conscript is far less waste of ammunition. Ammunition is a precious commodity, and when dependent on long supply trains, waste cannot be tolerated. The huge disadvantage is fewer rounds downrange in a specific time-frame when compared to more modern automatic weapons. Since conservation of ammunition is necessary, M16 and AK both have safe-semiauto-auto selector switch. One thing I noticed in the photograph of the Russian conscript with the Mosin was no bayonet attached, which is a departure from old doctrine. I obviously have no idea if he wasn’t issued one, lost it, removed it, traded it for food, etc. The Russians might not have issued bayonets to conscripts if they thought Ukraine was going to be easy or if they were concerned about refusal to fight. Issuing and ordering Soldiers to fix bayonets tells the Soldiers it’s going to get bloody, personal, and casualties will be high.


:pray :pray :amen :amen
 
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