Roooomba

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
Hey all, don't answer this question unless you have time to kill, because I really can't afford one. But, do any you guys/gals own a Roomba? (For those who don't know, it is like a an autonomous vacuum cleaner that ventures out to cleans your floors when you are asleep or awake (you program it) and as far as I can tell it might be between 1 to 1/5 feet wide, although I too tired to look up stats.

Do any of you own one? Do you know someone who does? Does it work. Is it worth the price?
 

JSTyler

Well-Known Member
We don't own one. We have however watched a home security video with a puppy in it that left a deposit on a carpet in a central location. The auto-vac decentralized it. Just use your imagination and if you're a pet owner, beware.

BTW, why does anyone want the inside of their homes video monitored and available online for any half capable hacker to access? Also, cats seem to love riding on those auto-vac gadgets.
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
Ahk! This did not bring a good visual, lol. Our dog is pretty cool in that she, in 10 years since we got her, has only had two accidents. Seriously. two. We got her shortly after puppyhood from a rescue shelter (YEA US! VIRTUE SIGNAL! YEAS US), but seriously, only two accidents.

As far as the video monitoring, I agree entirely, especially if you go with a security company. But if you now how to setup of secure network (LAN, in this case), you should be alright. Of course, my life is pretty boring and inconsequential. But when something does go bump in the night I did enjoy (when I had it my cam network up) being able to see live feed of the downstairs as well as the front driveway and backyard, etc.

But I get where you are coming from. Still, it would be neat to have an automatic vacuum cleaner for my first floor carpet. It's neither here nor there, though, because they are too expensive for my blood.
 

Batman

Well-Known Member
My sister uses a robot vac that is programmed to do her floors and supposedly doesn't get stuck or fall down the stairs or damage any furniture. I'd have to ask her for more insight on whether this is true. I don't think her vac is wired into an internet service or able to have any vid that can be watched from the outside world. Another question for me is whether these robot vacs do a good job on various carpet types, especially the mid range thickness type carpets?
 

GEOINTAnalyst

Well-Known Member
Your personal information can be hacked through your Roomba. Roombas use technology that maps out the layout of your home. Since this information is stored in the cloud, you risk your information being compromised. Companies have paired apps with robot vacuums and store the maps of your home within the cloud. Roomba vacuums use a technology called VSlam (Visual Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) to create a map layout of your home. Most other robot vacuums use LiDar (Laser Imaging Detection and Ranging) technology to complete the same task. The data stored within your robot vacuum app and cloud service can be shared with major companies. These include companies like Amazon, Apple and Google.
Although Roomba claims not to share data with third-party companies, in today’s world, these large corporations often have free reign over this type of information.
Once the hacked data is handed over to companies, they can start to use it to target you to buy certain products based on the data collected by your Roomba. Some of these robot vacuums have cellphone apps so while it may not be physically connected to the intiernet it is connected to your phone and your phone is connetected. Do you really want a Roomba? I use to want one but not anymore.
 
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GEOINTAnalyst

Well-Known Member
Your personal information can be hacked through your Roomba. Roombas use technology that maps out the layout of your home. Since this information is stored in the cloud, you risk your information being compromised. Companies have paired apps with robot vacuums and store the maps of your home within the cloud. Roomba vacuums use a technology called VSlam (Visual Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) to create a map layout of your home. Most other robot vacuums use LiDar (Laser Imaging Detection and Ranging) technology to complete the same task. The data stored within your robot vacuum app and cloud service can be shared with major companies. These include companies like Amazon, Apple and Google.
Although Roomba claims not to share data with third-party companies, in today’s world, these large corporations often have free reign over this type of information.
Once the hacked data is handed over to companies, they can start to use it to target you to buy certain products based on the data collected by your Roomba. Some of these robot vacuums have cellphone apps so while it may not be physically connected to the intiernet it is connected to your phone and your phone is connetected. Do you really want a Roomba? I use to want one but not anymore.
LiDar = (Light Detection and Ranging)
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
If enough fur in the house, the robotic vac has to be on continuous clean. The only way this is practical is to have a self-emptying model, which is actually very nice.

Some cats and dogs do enjoy riding on the vac. Some are afraid of it. Doesn't seem to bother the cleaning ability. UTube for hours of wasted time watching :lol Don't know if they can withstand rough play/treatment by a Tibetan Mastiff, etc. That's a training issue, though.

Unless in the vacuum only mode, the reservoir needs to hold enough cleaning solution to clean the selected area in its entirety, otherwise it runs out and stops or returns to empty/charge, but AFAIK, there's no auto loading of more cleaning solution (I could be wrong).

I'd really like to have one, just to keep the dog and cat hair picked up (vacuum only mode). There are a few models specifically for pets.

But $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Someday, if I can afford it . . .

FWIW, they're good for Seniors and handicapped that can't vacuum their apartments or houses themselves.

They can't do stairs, and to be practical, you need one for each level.

Different models and manufacturers. Some are better than others. Don't buy second-hand because motor longevity and expense.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Your personal information can be hacked through your Roomba. Roombas use technology that maps out the layout of your home. Since this information is stored in the cloud, you risk your information being compromised. Companies have paired apps with robot vacuums and store the maps of your home within the cloud. Roomba vacuums use a technology called VSlam (Visual Simultaneous Localization and Mapping) to create a map layout of your home. Most other robot vacuums use LiDar (Laser Imaging Detection and Ranging) technology to complete the same task. The data stored within your robot vacuum app and cloud service can be shared with major companies. These include companies like Amazon, Apple and Google.
Although Roomba claims not to share data with third-party companies, in today’s world, these large corporations often have free reign over this type of information.
Once the hacked data is handed over to companies, they can start to use it to target you to buy certain products based on the data collected by your Roomba. Some of these robot vacuums have cellphone apps so while it may not be physically connected to the intiernet it is connected to your phone and your phone is connetected. Do you really want a Roomba? I use to want one but not anymore.

Would it be possible to store the information locally, as in a stand-alone computer that never gets connected to the internet? Or a cell phone with the internet function turned off?
 

GEOINTAnalyst

Well-Known Member
Would it be possible to store the information locally, as in a stand-alone computer that never gets connected to the internet? Or a cell phone with the internet function turned off?
Possibly - the storage capacity in them is very limited, this is by design - that way it forces it to upload to the cloud eventually via your smart phone app - to clean the cache per se - but if your phone has the extra storage space I think it would be possible to transfer that data to a desktop providing that data is directly transferable - you would have to configure your own computer to act as a cloud server then transfer that data to your own private domain and provide an Application Programming Interface (API) that specifies the rules for this process. Not all Internet application today consists of pure client programs interacting with pure server programs. Increasingly, many application is peer-to-peer (P2P) applications the program in the user’s end system act as a client when it requests a file from another peer; and the program acts as a server when it sends a file to another peer.
 

ShilohRose

Well-Known Member
My son bought a Roomba knock off. It works better to maintain after the floors have been thoroughly vacuumed. My biggest complaint is how noisy the dang thing is. I understand the Roomba is much quieter -- also much more expensive, however.
 

GEOINTAnalyst

Well-Known Member

Robot vacuum cleaners can eavesdrop on your conversations, researchers reveal​

Researchers were able to use data collected by navigation sensors to record audio signals
Ingenious technique may be able to spy on some sensitive data, but requires a large amount of effort
A team of researchers have explained how internet-connected robot vacuum cleaners can be hacked to eavesdrop on homeowners’ private conversations.
Researchers from the University of Maryland, College Park and the National University of Singapore have published research detailing how they were able to launch an ingenious attack that could stealthily snoop on people without their knowledge – despite there being no actual acoustic microphone built into the vacuum cleaner.

https://www.bitdefender.com/blog/ho...an-eavesdrop-conversations-researchers-reveal
 

Andiamo

"Let's go!"
One thing I love is this is the only vacuum ever I have been able to take completely apart, clean all the hair and dust out, and actually replace my own parts which are sold on the roomba website and Amazon. Making this the most cost effective vac I have ever owned. as of right now everything is replaceable....brushes, motorized parts, wheels, everything....and I plan to continue this indefinitely. Had it for 6 years and have replaced probably $100 worth of parts (plus batteries) and it still works great.
 

Everlasting Life

Through Faith in Jesus
So what are the manufacturers doing plug the security flaw(s)?

Part of the challenge on this is that in the invention/purpose of item phase certain security wasn't something that was thought of or at least the ones that cropped up. Partly because that wasn't the focus and partly because those inventing can't think of every way a product would be taken advantage of from a security point of view (maybe hollywood can help with this one).

So for example, keys that allow one to just open their car doors by automatically unlocking when the keys are nearby the car are really cool. Something that car manufacturers didn't think of (I mean I wouldn't of thought of this) was that there would be some creative criminals figuring out how to tap into the key's signal from inside the house, unlock your car doors and take what they wanted. The manufacturers are working on a fix, but in the meantime one needs to put their keys in a metal box to keep the signal from being tapped.

The other thing is that technology is moving so fast it's hard to keep up on bugs.

Of course some common sense is good to use. When the whole camera's in houses thing was being promoted I instantly realized that they could be used to spy on people, same with t.v's and remotes that 'listen' for instructions. If communication of any sort can go one way, then it can go the opposite unless configured differently.
 

GEOINTAnalyst

Well-Known Member
So what are the manufacturers doing plug the security flaw(s)?
Not much of anything I am guessing - you would have to fix the code but that will probably happen only on later models - if you know the coding language you could write a firewall into the code but then you would have to wire in an Ethernet port to communicate with the firewall directly to reject outside IP addresses from your LAN or find an old one that does not use an App - bottom line is if your robot-vac has an App it can be hacked if not you are most likely safe
 
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