Right To Repair

Chris

Administrator
Staff member
Right To Repair
By Todd Strandberg

The Right to Repair has become an important issue in America. Companies have become so powerful that they are destroying our system of capitalism. When you buy many products today, you are basically renting them. When something you 100% own breaks, you have to upgrade or turn to the company for expensive repairs.

A few weeks ago I read that President Joe Biden had signed an executive order that supported people’s Right to Repair. The executive order targeted anti-competitive practices in tech, healthcare, banking, and other key parts of the economy. The order has 72 actions that would lower prices for families, increase wages for workers, promote innovation, and foster economic growth. New regulations that agencies may write to translate his policy into rules could trigger epic legal battles, however.

I thought that was strange for the president to be implementing a rule that should go through Congress. It turns out there is already a law that guarantees the people’s Right to Repair, but companies have decided to ignore the law. Apple and John Deere are two notorious firms for violating the Right to Repair law.

Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak spoke out on the issue during a recent appearance on Cameo, a website. In a post to Louis Rossmann, a YouTube personality and a right-to-repair advocate, Wozniak said that he was “totally supportive” of the cause — which gives consumers the right and information to fix their own devices — and somewhat “emotionally” affected by it.

“I do a lot of Cameos, but this one has really gotten to me,” he said in the nine-minute video. “We wouldn’t have had an Apple had I not grown up in a very open technology world.

Wozniak, who co-founded Apple 45 years ago with Steve Jobs, said that enabling others to retool their devices also has commercial value. He pointed to the success of the Apple II computer, which he said was “modifiable and extendable to the maximum” and the “only source” of profit for Apple during its first years.

Apple has long faced criticism over policies that restrict where its customers can get their iPhones and other electronics fixed without jeopardizing their warranties. The firm is worth $2.5 trillion, and it is trying to squeeze this last dollar out of each customer.

The iPhone once cost $600, and the same smartphone is now $1,200. Apple will sign contracts with chip firms that bar them from selling replacement chips. It will also block other chips from working in their smartphone, even though it has the same functions.

I had a Samsung Note 2 for seven years that worked fine the whole time I owned it. In late 2019 I realized I needed to upgrade because Samsung had quit supporting my Note 2. What allowed me to have the smartphone for seven years is that I was able to replace the battery two times. Now the battery is tied to the internal parts of the smartphone, which makes it very hard to fix it once the battery dies.

To have John Deere playing this same game shows how bad things have gotten. Farmers need their equipment to work at crucial times during the planting and harvesting seasons. If their tractor is down and a corn crop needs to be harvested, they need to be able to get it fixed fast. John Deere is trying to require that their specialist needs to be on hand for a growing number of issues.

Farmers cannot do simple repairs because they are locked out of their equipment and need special software to unlock it. To get around this, some farmers had begun hacking their tractors with cracked software from Ukraine.

The FTC is moving toward writing new rules targeting the restrictions. A couple of weeks ago, the five FTC commissioners unanimously adopted a policy statement supporting the “Right to Repair” that pledges beefed-up enforcement efforts and could open the way to new regulations.

“These types of (repair) restrictions can significantly raise costs for consumers, stifle innovation, close off business opportunity for independent repair shops, create unnecessary electronic waste, delay timely repairs and undermine resiliency,” FTC Chair Lina Khan said. “The FTC has a range of tools it can use to root out unlawful repair restrictions, and today’s policy statement would commit us to move forward on this issue with new vigor.”

Manufacturers, on the other hand, maintain that repair restrictions are needed to safeguard intellectual property, protect consumers from injuries that could result from fixing a product or using one that was improperly repaired, and guard against cybersecurity risks. Manufacturers say they could face liability or harm to their reputation if independent repair shops make faulty equipment repairs.

I don’t have any faith in the Biden administration’s ability to fix the Right to Repair problem. Big tech companies have lobbyists who help write the laws that regulate their business. They will push for rules that allow them to continue restricting the rights of product owners.

If our nation had a greater moral foundation, we would not have such a problem with the Right to Repair. Because we have largely become a godless nation, I don’t have much hope for consumer’s rights.

“And GOD saw that the wickedness of man was great in the earth, and that every imagination of the thoughts of his heart was only evil continually” (Genesis 6:5, KJV).

–Todd

https://www.raptureforums.com/end-times/right-to-repair/
 

cavalier973

Well-Known Member
I have come to the belief that corporations are not actually free market institutions. All of them are created and regulated by government, and are granted special privileges by the government (such as limited liability), so all of them are functionaries of the government. They act as tax collectors for the government’s sales taxes, and have begun enforcing government policies that the government itself fears to enforce because of legal restrictions—I speak of the US government, and the Constitutional limits placed upon it.
 

cavalier973

Well-Known Member
One of my impossible daydreams is to start a company that builds automobiles that are reasonably priced, and that people could repair themselves. No computer systems or anything like that. Unfortunately, even if I had the capital and the knowledge to do so, the mountain of government regulations would destine the project to failure.
 

bigmoose

Well-Known Member
I have repaired my trucks, cars and equipment my entire life. I appreciate the microprocessors in the trucks these days. I actually logged 34 mpg in a 6000 lb 4x4 truck last month for 50 miles coming home from our daughter's home. This compare to 12 mpg tops for my 1978 version of the same truck. That said, I despise the need to have a $1200 diagnostic tool to read the systems on that truck. There could just as easily be a USB jack in the glove box that allowed your laptop to connect to it. However I believe the manufacturers have monetized the info stream, and they will likely not give it up.
"
 

TheRedeemed

Well-Known Member
I've never seen the engine in my 2018 model. When you open the bonnet (hood for you over the ponder's) there's a huge plastic cover bolted on in several places with just 3 holes in it. One for checking the oil, one for filling the oil and one for the cooling system. I'm sure there's an engine hiding under there somewhere coz it starts up and sounds like one and the car moves.

I think these manufacturers are trying to tell us to mind our business now and if you want a fix or repair, bring it back to us, and if you unbolt this cover, your warranty is done.
 

Spartan Sprinter 1

Formerly known as Shaun
I've never seen the engine in my 2018 model. When you open the bonnet (hood for you over the ponder's) there's a huge plastic cover bolted on in several places with just 3 holes in it. One for checking the oil, one for filling the oil and one for the cooling system. I'm sure there's an engine hiding under there somewhere coz it starts up and sounds like one and the car moves.

I think these manufacturers are trying to tell us to mind our business now and if you want a fix or repair, bring it back to us, and if you unbolt this cover, your warranty is done.

Yeah i dont like having to start my car by simultaneously putting my foot on the break and pressing a button instead of just using a key and ignition
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
I also have a push-start rather than an ignition on my Jeep Cherokee.
I had to replace the battery last month and it was $170. :pout2
My guy said battery prices have sky-rocketed.

I had the dealer change out my battery on a vehicle recently. I'd done that myself my whole life, but this battery wasn't accessible without either removing the whole air box ensemble or the wipers and body parts under the wipers... plus you then need to go in to a computer and tell the computer that there's a new battery, otherwise the system will treat the new battery as if it was an old worn out battery. They charged me $190 for the battery but only $10 to do the job, so I wasn't unhappy with what they charged, just with the fact that it was best I let them do it...
 

Carl

Well-Known Member
Anything to make a buck. I know that the tractors have lots of electronics in them. But they could be modular. Module is broken unplug it and take it in for an exchange. Then farmer can fix it himself. Same would apply to cars and trucks and anything that uses computerized electronics. Otherwise lets put Big Budd back in business!
 

Spartan Sprinter 1

Formerly known as Shaun
I had the dealer change out my battery on a vehicle recently. I'd done that myself my whole life, but this battery wasn't accessible without either removing the whole air box ensemble or the wipers and body parts under the wipers... plus you then need to go in to a computer and tell the computer that there's a new battery, otherwise the system will treat the new battery as if it was an old worn out battery. They charged me $190 for the battery but only $10 to do the job, so I wasn't unhappy with what they charged, just with the fact that it was best I let them do it...

Same i use to be semi handy fixing things on my car , but with all the electronics now and the difficulty to get to parts im no longer confident to do so
 

3 Nails 4 Given

Sinner saved by the blood of Jesus
One of the biggest problems with repair on newer model vehicles is the constantly updated computer software.

OBD, on board diagnostics, computers and readers are constantly being updated. OBD 1 was replaced by OBD 2 etc…

Then mfgs, started making additional separate computers, a engine computers with a separate body computer with shared and split databases.

GM techs had to have OBD 1&2 scanners plus GM’s proprietary GM Tech 2 scanner. The tech 2 scanner was updated in 2015. This required either a complete software update or the newer tool.

Many of the OBD and manufacturer proprietary tools can be interfaced with a laptop. This makes repairing newer vehicles much harder for independent mechanic shops because they can’t afford to purchase all of the new hardware and software.

Snap On Tools has been a leader in vehicle diagnostic tools. The problem there is a new version Snap On diagnostic scanner with 2021 software can cost up to $10,000. Yearly software updates can be in the thousands too. If you take a shop that works on domestic and foreign vehicles the costs are high for all of the required software.

I do most of our vehicle repair and maintenance. A internal combustion engine is the same today as it was when it was invented. Great strides have been made in their operating systems, but the engine is the same.

Now combine the Hybrid cars into the mix and it is a game changer. I’m just now learning these systems and they are simple and complex at the same time. High voltage electric motors combined with internal combustion engines. They are efficient and complex.

The internet has kept me with the ability to continue to repair my vehicles. Some of the simple repairs that dealers are charging thousands for can be accomplished rather cheaply and some cannot.

I replaced the blown head gasket on my Prius for a total cost of $750, including new gaskets, bolts, machine shop work such as complete valve job new valve seals etc.. The dealer charges from $2,500-$5,000. It was a pain, but thanks to the internet, and some advice from a couple of Toyota mechanics. I was able to do it. I even discovered a tech tip that I published on a forum, to help future mechanics.

The right to repair bill will ultimately drive up the costs for independent mechanics as it will require manufacturers and dealers to share proprietary data.

The dealers want you dependent on paying their astronomical repair prices or buying there astronomically priced extended warranties.

I didn’t used to be a fan of dealer extended warranties. But with the technology used in newer vehicles it is usually a wise choice if you can afford to add it on a new vehicle.
 

Carl

Well-Known Member
I just remembered that back in late 880s or early 90 they were talking about having the engine compartment totally sealed so only the dealer could work on the car. Now it is happening.
 

biblegirl

Well-Known Member
Corporations have become openly greedy. There was a time they cared about pleasing their customers, but that day seems to be long gone. The people at the top are so far removed from their customer base that they really don't seem to care about offering quality products at a price that is fair to both sides. Instead, I think many corporate leaders look down on their customers and consider us as deserving of being fleeced. Instead of good products, we now get shoddy items along with a big dose of Social Justice virtue signaling. My response to this is to buy things as basic and simple as I can find. The less bells and whistles, the less that can go wrong. Other than my cell phone, computer, and my husband's newer model pickup truck, we don't have much in the way of advanced technology, and I'm happy with a simpler lifestyle.
 

Berni

Well-Known Member
What worries me the most is the fact that the manufacturers/dealers themselves can remotely immobilise your vehicle or equipment for any reason that they so choose. For example, you didn't immediately respond to their email request that you book a service with them. It seems to me that it is a licence for the manufacturer to print money.

Also, the hackers could have a field day in terms of theft of the vehicle, which is happening already here in the UK, or immobilising it just for the sake of it.

The farmers using the John Deere computerised equipment, could also really come unstuck and not be able to harvest their crops on time.

The more that technology is integrated into everyday life, the more power and control is being handed over to faceless corporations. JMHO.
 

DWB

Well-Known Member
John Deere will not open an engine to try and repair. Your choice is a new engine or go somewhere else. Under warranty it's no problem, but once that's gone you are in trouble. So a rebuild is out of the question, tripling your cost by having to buy new engine.
 

Hidden

Well-Known Member
I don't have a car of my own, but as the purchasing officer of our company, I know a bit about what you guys are saying. I receive requests for auto parts on a regular basis. They are for our company fleet - cars, pick-ups, trucks, excavator - and the requests come from our in-house mechanic. The cost of these parts take a huge chunk of our budget, and I've noticed we buy the same parts almost every year or two years. Granted our vehicles are heavily used by our technicians all day long, still they break down almost right on schedule.
 

3 Nails 4 Given

Sinner saved by the blood of Jesus
John Deere will not open an engine to try and repair. Your choice is a new engine or go somewhere else. Under warranty it's no problem, but once that's gone you are in trouble. So a rebuild is out of the question, tripling your cost by having to buy new engine.
I have a John Deere diesel tractor. The engine is built by Isuzu. I have a Chevrolet Silverado Duramax diesel the engine in it is also built by Isuzu.

It’s easy to find parts for either one of them. The parts through JD are $$$ high.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
I have repaired my trucks, cars and equipment my entire life. I appreciate the microprocessors in the trucks these days. I actually logged 34 mpg in a 6000 lb 4x4 truck last month for 50 miles coming home from our daughter's home. This compare to 12 mpg tops for my 1978 version of the same truck. That said, I despise the need to have a $1200 diagnostic tool to read the systems on that truck. There could just as easily be a USB jack in the glove box that allowed your laptop to connect to it. However I believe the manufacturers have monetized the info stream, and they will likely not give it up.
"
Software and a dongle attached to the little netbook for my previous computerized car :biggrin Less than $100 and it also let me do preventative maintenance and "mark" it done in the vehicle computer, and customize the various computer settings (if one knows what one is doing; else the vehicle can really and seriously break :eek

Haven't needed to use it on my current vehicle (yet) Actually don't know if I need to get a different version since different brands of cars.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
There's a technical term for this: built-in obsolescence :furious :rant :mad :wild :frust


I'd rather go back to the days of three pedals inside and time it with a flashlight, piece of chalk, and a flat-bladed screwdriver.

Or a kick starter and hand signals :lol
 
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