Psalm 27 a rapture prophecy?

paul289

Well-Known Member
Sure seems like it.

4 One thing I ask from the Lord,
this only do I seek:
that I may dwell in the house of the Lord
all the days of my life,
to gaze on the beauty of the Lord
and to seek him in his temple.
5 For in the day of trouble
he will keep me safe in his dwelling;
he will hide me in the shelter of his sacred tent
and set me high upon a rock.

In Verse 4, David says he wants to spend eternity in God's house, but in Verse 5, he will be hidden in his tent on the day of trouble. Tents are temporary, much like our stay in Heaven during the tribulation. After that, we reign with Christ on earth for 1,000 years, and then we will live with God in his house, our permanent dwelling, the New Jerusalem. So David seems to be looking forward to our ultimate dwelling with God for eternity, with a temporary stay during the time of judgement and protection from the persecution of the Tribulation.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Sure seems like it.

4 One thing I ask from the Lord,
this only do I seek:
that I may dwell in the house of the Lord
all the days of my life,
to gaze on the beauty of the Lord
and to seek him in his temple.
5 For in the day of trouble
he will keep me safe in his dwelling;
he will hide me in the shelter of his sacred tent
and set me high upon a rock.

In Verse 4, David says he wants to spend eternity in God's house, but in Verse 5, he will be hidden in his tent on the day of trouble. Tents are temporary, much like our stay in Heaven during the tribulation. After that, we reign with Christ on earth for 1,000 years, and then we will live with God in his house, our permanent dwelling, the New Jerusalem. So David seems to be looking forward to our ultimate dwelling with God for eternity, with a temporary stay during the time of judgement and protection from the persecution of the Tribulation.
Can't see it myself.
 
Certain experts have posited that Isaiah 26 (specifically verses 19-21) is referring to the rapture along with protection during the tribulation as well. Interesting theory.
19 But your dead will live, Lord;
their bodies will rise—
let those who dwell in the dust
wake up and shout for joy—
your dew is like the dew of the morning;
the earth will give birth to her dead.
20 Go, my people, enter your rooms
and shut the doors behind you;
hide yourselves for a little while
until his wrath has passed by.
21 See, the Lord is coming out of his dwelling
to punish the people of the earth for their sins.
The earth will disclose the blood shed on it;
the earth will conceal its slain no longer.
 

Chris

Administrator
Staff member
Certain experts have posited that Isaiah 26 (specifically verses 19-21) is referring to the rapture along with protection during the tribulation as well. Interesting theory.
Yes, I agree that is a rapture passage. Jack Kelley says it better than I can here:

Isaiah And The Rapture
By Jack Kelley

Question: I am currently reading through Isaiah. One chapter/verse has stuck with me, and I need some insight. Do you think that Isa 26:20-21 is speaking prophetically about the Church, or is he speaking to the remnant of Israel that will be supernaturally protected in Petra during the Great Trib? I read the NIV, and it uses the word “rooms”. Upon reading Isaiah’s statement, I immediately thought of John 14:2, where the NIV also uses the word “rooms”, and I understand its a more literal translation of Jesus’ statement, as opposed to Mansions in the KJV. Could it simply be a coincidence, and Isaiah is really just speaking to Israel?

Answer: Isaiah 26:19-21 are meant to be taken together. In verse 19 the subject is the resurrection, and because of the similarity to John 14:2-3 it makes sense to assume that verse 20 is speaking of the Rapture, which comes immediately after. In the narrative, both verses precede the wrath of God, which only applies to the Church. Most scholars place the resurrection of Israel’s dead at the end of the Great Tribulation based on Daniel 12:1-2. Finally, if Isaiah was referring to the Jews in Petra during the end tines, he would have reversed the order since living Jews are told to flee into the mountains first, then the dead are raised later.

I believe Isaiah 26:19-21 is the passage Paul was referring to when he opened the rapture passage in 1 Thes. 4 by saying “according to the Lord’s own word.” (1 Thes. 4:15) The Lord never clearly mentioned the rapture in the New Testament. In my study “Defending The Pre Trib Rapture” I did a verse by verse comparison of Isaiah 26;19-21 with 1 Thes. 4:16-17 and 1 Thes. 5:9. The similarities are striking.

https://gracethrufaith.com/ask-a-bible-teacher/isaiah-and-the-rapture/
 
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