Prices Already Rising

JoyJoyJoy

I Shall Not Be Moved
We thankfully found a local farmer's market with much lower prices than the Publix nearby.
We have a *fruit stand* or tiny farmers market near us. The produce is high quality, but this year, the prices have sky rocketed.
The huge peaches are a beautiful gift from God and I could untold millions of them. But at $2.99/lb, they are $1/peach. We buy 2-3 at the time so there's no time for any to rot. Oh how I love good fresh fruit!!! That's something that I look forward to in the MK.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
We have a *fruit stand* or tiny farmers market near us. The produce is high quality, but this year, the prices have sky rocketed.
The huge peaches are a beautiful gift from God and I could untold millions of them. But at $2.99/lb, they are $1/peach. We buy 2-3 at the time so there's no time for any to rot. Oh how I love good fresh fruit!!! That's something that I look forward to in the MK.

Mainly because of where I live, I almost never eat fresh fruit anymore, but buy bags of dried fruit. Dried apricots, plums, pears, sometimes peaches/nectarines... "fresh" fruit up here is pretty expensive and it's a bummer when you bit into a peach that looks delicious but it isn't... so I rarely buy the fresh stuff for me. I do do buy bananas for the family, and apples when there's a sale price I can stomach...

That said, biting into a delicious peach or nectarine that is very good is one of the finest moments in this life.
 
Last edited:

Armor of Light

Praising my Savior all the day long!
That said, biting into a delicious peach or nectarine that is very good is one of the finest moments in this life.
Mom and dad owned a large lot about 3/4 acre and there were mature pear, plum, peach, apricot, cherry and two apple trees, a Golden delicious that mom always canned like 50 jars(or more) of apple sauce and a red that she used for pies/apple crisps. The pear and plum trees were my favorite, bite into either and you had delicious juice running down your face, she made lots of jams/jellies too, they were all wonderful. Peaches were good, but that fuzzy skin made me choose another option but love the flavor and juice..
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
Mom and dad owned a large lot about 3/4 acre and there were mature pear, plum, peach, apricot, cherry and two apple trees, a Golden delicious that mom always canned like 50 jars(or more) of apple sauce and a red that she used for pies/apple crisps. The pear and plum trees were my favorite, bite into either and you had delicious juice running down your face, she made lots of jams/jellies too, they were all wonderful. Peaches were good, but that fuzzy skin made me choose another option but love the flavor and juice..

It's hard to get tasty fresh fruit at the grocery store though it occasionally happens. Picking a fully fresh fruit off a tree... now that's got possibilities for deliciousness.
 

alisani

Well-Known Member
We grew up with fruit and veg as snacks and I do the same in my household. So it's uncommon for me to buy processed snacks unless as an occasional treat. I grow what I can here but bananas, avocado and the like I have to buy. Thankfully, avocados aren't as pricey here as @Ghoti Ichthus but they're climbing. Like Joy, our peaches are more than a dollar each. But I splurge on seasonal fruits because I can still buy bulk and can them. Same with watermelon. I use the rind for pickles and salsa so even priced higher, I'm still getting a good return on them. Our older neighbor has scuppernongs and muscadines and we are permitted to pick freely and I have wild blackberry and strawberry here, though again I buy bulk of strawberry in the spring.
 

alisani

Well-Known Member
@JoyJoyJoy

For about 6 pints of pickle you need rind from one medium size melon, fresh ginger-buy the root, table sugar, pickling lime, whole cloves, cinnamon sticks and white vinegar. Make sure your vinegar has a higher acidity. Some folks use apple cider vinegar too. I stick with white from my great-gram's recipe.

You'll be making a little sack for the spices. Don't worry about buying cheesecloth. Coffee filters work just as well and you can just tie it up with a bit of string.

Quarter and slice your melon. Remove as much of the pink pulp as you can. I eventually size mine at around a 1 1/2 inch wedge. Too small and it's mush. Soak overnight or 8 hours at least with pickling lime. 3 heaping TBSP dissolved in warm water. Make sure you use a non-reactive bowl! Put a weight on them too so they are fully immersed. After, give them several rinses. You want that lime gone, then soak in a cold water bath for 30 minutes or so and rinse again.

Put 2 TBSP of whole cloves, 3 cinnamon sticks and 1/2 inch of fresh peeled ginger in your spice bag and tie it tight.

In a large pot, again not aluminum! Add your spice bag, 8 cups sugar, 1 quart water, 1 quart vinegar and simmer 10 minutes. Then add your rind, bring to a low boil, simmer about an hour. Maybe a little less. Look for clear or translucent rinds. Remove the spices.

At this point, you can start packing it into your sterilized jars. Leave a half inch of space at the top and wipe away any bubbles or spots of liquid. You want to process them in a covered water bath in your canner for about 10 minutes. When you take them out rest them for a full 24 hours before you place them on your shelves. Don't worry if you don't have enough trivet, just set them on kitchen towels. Make sure your jars pop, that means they are sealed! Yay! They'll keep for a year. When you open one, it'll need to be in the fridge after and will keep there for 3 weeks in the coldest part of your fridge.

You can use whole pickling spices in place of the cloves etc and add red pepper if you want spicy pickles. These make good relishes and salsas.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
I have scuppernog vines in my yard. That's another favorite of mine. I could eat them til my mouth is raw.

When I was doing missionary work in Colombia South America, most of the time I was in a state of starvation. While visiting one area there was a pineapple farm. When I was told about the pineapples I looked up to see them. I had no idea they grew on rather short plants. After everyone had a good laugh at my expense, we started eating ready to harvest pineapples. When you're in a starving condition, it isn't hard to overdo it. I think the acid in the pineapple must have eaten away much of the skin in my mouth. It was very sore after that for many days... but the calories were good for me.
 

JoyJoyJoy

I Shall Not Be Moved
pineapples
Another gift from God!! How can people eat fruit and not know that Our Lord provides these delicious treats??!!

Tall, I am sorry for the time that you were starved. I imagine your reward will be great.

@alisani thank you sister for the recipe. We need to get together in the MK, eat a whole watermelon then have a pickle party.♡♡♡♡♡♡
 

ChildofLight

Well-Known Member
@JoyJoyJoy

For about 6 pints of pickle you need rind from one medium size melon, fresh ginger-buy the root, table sugar, pickling lime, whole cloves, cinnamon sticks and white vinegar. Make sure your vinegar has a higher acidity. Some folks use apple cider vinegar too. I stick with white from my great-gram's recipe.

You'll be making a little sack for the spices. Don't worry about buying cheesecloth. Coffee filters work just as well and you can just tie it up with a bit of string.

Quarter and slice your melon. Remove as much of the pink pulp as you can. I eventually size mine at around a 1 1/2 inch wedge. Too small and it's mush. Soak overnight or 8 hours at least with pickling lime. 3 heaping TBSP dissolved in warm water. Make sure you use a non-reactive bowl! Put a weight on them too so they are fully immersed. After, give them several rinses. You want that lime gone, then soak in a cold water bath for 30 minutes or so and rinse again.

Put 2 TBSP of whole cloves, 3 cinnamon sticks and 1/2 inch of fresh peeled ginger in your spice bag and tie it tight.

In a large pot, again not aluminum! Add your spice bag, 8 cups sugar, 1 quart water, 1 quart vinegar and simmer 10 minutes. Then add your rind, bring to a low boil, simmer about an hour. Maybe a little less. Look for clear or translucent rinds. Remove the spices.

At this point, you can start packing it into your sterilized jars. Leave a half inch of space at the top and wipe away any bubbles or spots of liquid. You want to process them in a covered water bath in your canner for about 10 minutes. When you take them out rest them for a full 24 hours before you place them on your shelves. Don't worry if you don't have enough trivet, just set them on kitchen towels. Make sure your jars pop, that means they are sealed! Yay! They'll keep for a year. When you open one, it'll need to be in the fridge after and will keep there for 3 weeks in the coldest part of your fridge.

You can use whole pickling spices in place of the cloves etc and add red pepper if you want spicy pickles. These make good relishes and salsas.
Grow the yellow watermelons for pickling. They have a much thicker rind. They are an heirloom so can regrow the seeds from the melon. They are prolific, can get very large, more heat tolerant and yet the flesh is sweet, juicy and not too many seeds. Had many last year, gave away some snd they struggled to pick them up to take.
 

alisani

Well-Known Member
Grow the yellow watermelons for pickling. They have a much thicker rind. They are an heirloom so can regrow the seeds from the melon. They are prolific, can get very large, more heat tolerant and yet the flesh is sweet, juicy and not too many seeds. Had many last year, gave away some snd they struggled to pick them up to take.
Will do. I have noticed thinner rinds in the green for the past few years.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
None of the apple juice that Dad likes at WF. Refuse to pay the even more ridiculous price for it at the local chain, assuming they have any left. Hopefully, supplies will increase and prices come down when the apple harvest and processing starts. I think there's another jug for after the one in the fridge :pray
 

pixelpusher

Well-Known Member
@JoyJoyJoy

For about 6 pints of pickle you need rind from one medium size melon, fresh ginger-buy the root, table sugar, pickling lime, whole cloves, cinnamon sticks and white vinegar. Make sure your vinegar has a higher acidity. Some folks use apple cider vinegar too. I stick with white from my great-gram's recipe.

You'll be making a little sack for the spices. Don't worry about buying cheesecloth. Coffee filters work just as well and you can just tie it up with a bit of string.

Quarter and slice your melon. Remove as much of the pink pulp as you can. I eventually size mine at around a 1 1/2 inch wedge. Too small and it's mush. Soak overnight or 8 hours at least with pickling lime. 3 heaping TBSP dissolved in warm water. Make sure you use a non-reactive bowl! Put a weight on them too so they are fully immersed. After, give them several rinses. You want that lime gone, then soak in a cold water bath for 30 minutes or so and rinse again.

Put 2 TBSP of whole cloves, 3 cinnamon sticks and 1/2 inch of fresh peeled ginger in your spice bag and tie it tight.

In a large pot, again not aluminum! Add your spice bag, 8 cups sugar, 1 quart water, 1 quart vinegar and simmer 10 minutes. Then add your rind, bring to a low boil, simmer about an hour. Maybe a little less. Look for clear or translucent rinds. Remove the spices.

At this point, you can start packing it into your sterilized jars. Leave a half inch of space at the top and wipe away any bubbles or spots of liquid. You want to process them in a covered water bath in your canner for about 10 minutes. When you take them out rest them for a full 24 hours before you place them on your shelves. Don't worry if you don't have enough trivet, just set them on kitchen towels. Make sure your jars pop, that means they are sealed! Yay! They'll keep for a year. When you open one, it'll need to be in the fridge after and will keep there for 3 weeks in the coldest part of your fridge.

You can use whole pickling spices in place of the cloves etc and add red pepper if you want spicy pickles. These make good relishes and salsas.

Thanks! That is brand new knowledge today, no idea one could pickle watermelon rind.
 
Top