Parable of the Ten Minas

Rez63

Well-Known Member
In Luke 19:11-27 Jesus told a Parable. It was in response to the thinking that the Kingdom Of God would appear immediately (verse 11).
Verses 11-12 state that the master gave TEN of his servants 10 minas and to do business till he comes back from his journey.
In verse 15 the master returns and wants an account from his servants.
But in verses 16-25 only 3 servants were required to give account of what they had done.
Why only three?
The context is the "immediate appearing of the Kingdom of God".
Im not understanding. Any thoughts?
 

Any Minute

Tetelestai !!
In Luke 19:11-27 Jesus told a Parable. It was in response to the thinking that the Kingdom Of God would appear immediately (verse 11).
Verses 11-12 state that the master gave TEN of his servants 10 minas and to do business till he comes back from his journey.
In verse 15 the master returns and wants an account from his servants.
But in verses 16-25 only 3 servants were required to give account of what they had done.
Why only three?
The context is the "immediate appearing of the Kingdom of God".
Im not understanding. Any thoughts?

My thoughts are these. Parables convey a specific spiritual truth and lesson, and shouldn’t always be stretched so far in a way that too much emphasis is put on every detail used to convey that truth. That’s not to say that beyond the main point of the parable, other information can’t be gleaned, but they are meant to convey something specific that Jesus wanted to get across to those He is teaching.

The timing of the Kingdom appearing was the question, though Jesus didn’t answer them directly. They were still unaware of the Church Age that was hidden between two mountains, so to speak.

Why did only 3 servants have to give an account? I don’t know. Maybe it would have been redundant and not necessary to go through all 10 accounts. Maybe the rest are ‘ those who stood by’ and are accounted for in verses 24-25.

Imho, the main thrust isn’t specifically about the Kingdom (at least not the timing of its appearance) but of what they (you, me, them ,us) do with what we have been given. Do we sow the Word and the salvation only Jesus can offer into others thereby when He returns to collect (the Kingdom) there will be much interest (many more added)?

Sorry, just my rambling thought. It may not be what you were looking for.
 

mattfivefour

Well-Known Member
Imho, the main thrust isn’t specifically about the Kingdom (at least not the timing of its appearance) but of what they (you, me, them ,us) do with what we have been given. Do we sow the Word and the salvation only Jesus can offer into others thereby when He returns to collect (the Kingdom) there will be much interest (many more added)?
This is a good answer. That indeed is the point of the parable. Yet let's look at this parable a bit more.

Some expositors believe the fact that a specific number of servants --ten-- is mentioned at the beginning may possibly symbolize that these are servants who have been specifically called and are given a task, ie: those given a particular ministry. However, from the wording in the Greek, I believe it actually refers to all who belong to Christ. Unlike the parable in Matthew 25, the servants are not individually given differing amounts (which, there, refers to the differing abilities given to men: some being given more abilities than others). Rather it would appear here that each one is given the same thing and as a group they are told to "occupy" with it, as it says in the KJV. The word in the original Greek means to do business so as to gain a profit, which is why Any Minute"s explanation of the purpose is correct. The point is that ALL of Christ's servants are given the same gift-- the gospel. Each of us is commissioned to use that gift to enrich Christ's Kingdom so that when He returns He will have more than when He left.

The fact that only three servants are mentioned at the end is because it only takes three to make the point of this parable. Those who have done much with what they have will be given much responsibility to rule in Christ's Kingdom when He returns. (Remember Christ says we will reign with Him ... Daniel 7:27; 1 Corinthians 6:2-3; Revelation 2:26; 20:6. ) Those who have done little will be given only a small place of rule in His Kingdom. And those who do nothing with what He has given them will not rule at all: all reward that they may have had will be stripped from them. In fact, I would parallel this parable with what Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians 3:12-15.

I pray this helps.
 

Rez63

Well-Known Member
This is a good answer. That indeed is the point of the parable. Yet let's look at this parable a bit more.

Some expositors believe the fact that a specific number of servants --ten-- is mentioned at the beginning may possibly symbolize that these are servants who have been specifically called and are given a task, ie: those given a particular ministry. However, from the wording in the Greek, I believe it actually refers to all who belong to Christ. Unlike the parable in Matthew 25, the servants are not individually given differing amounts (which, there, refers to the differing abilities given to men: some being given more abilities than others). Rather it would appear here that each one is given the same thing and as a group they are told to "occupy" with it, as it says in the KJV. The word in the original Greek means to do business so as to gain a profit, which is why Any Minute"s explanation of the purpose is correct. The point is that ALL of Christ's servants are given the same gift-- the gospel. Each of us is commissioned to use that gift to enrich Christ's Kingdom so that when He returns He will have more than when He left.

The fact that only three servants are mentioned at the end is because it only takes three to make the point of this parable. Those who have done much with what they have will be given much responsibility to rule in Christ's Kingdom when He returns. (Remember Christ says we will reign with Him ... Daniel 7:27; 1 Corinthians 6:2-3; Revelation 2:26; 20:6. ) Those who have done little will be given only a small place of rule in His Kingdom. And those who do nothing with what He has given them will not rule at all: all reward that they may have had will be stripped from them. In fact, I would parallel this parable with what Paul wrote in 1 Corinthians 3:12-15.

I pray this helps.
Awesome!! Thank you. Both of your answers make sense!
 
Top