Osteoporosis

Leigh

Well-Known Member
Last year my DEXA scan showed osteopenia and early osteoporosis, so my doctor prescribed Boniva. Well, I did a little research and decided against taking it. My annual physical is next week and I figure I'm going to be "in trouble" for not starting the medicine. Now, my doctor is wonderful, so I don't mean any disrespect towards her; this is the standard recommendation, I'm sure.

I just wondered if any of you ladies (or even men) have dealt with this and what you do about it?
 

Cloud Watcher

Well-Known Member
I take Vit D, calcium and collagen. Years ago I was prescribed fosamax, but I didn't take it very long after I heard of some negative side effects.

I don't always do what the doctor suggests. My doc wanted me to take an aspirin a day. I don't do it. Aspirin is one thing I know about that can cause tinnitus. My tinnitus is already too disruptive in my life. I don't need it to be worse. There are other Rx's over the years that I have declined to take. I tend to research things.

My dexascan is coming up in 10 days. I hope my self care has been sufficient.
 

Leigh

Well-Known Member
I take Vit D, calcium and collagen. Years ago I was prescribed fosamax, but I didn't take it very long after I heard of some negative side effects.

I don't always do what the doctor suggests. My doc wanted me to take an aspirin a day. I don't do it. Aspirin is one thing I know about that can cause tinnitus. My tinnitus is already too disruptive in my life. I don't need it to be worse. There are other Rx's over the years that I have declined to take. I tend to research things.

My dexascan is coming up in 10 days. I hope my self care has been sufficient.
Oh, let us know how your DEXA scan turns out! It will be interesting to see if your supplements help.

I also already take Vitamin D3 (and K2 along with it, because they work better together from what I hear), and collagen.

Exercise is supposed to help also, and that is one area where I need to improve.
 

Leigh

Well-Known Member
There's a product called Bone Maximizer by MRM that has boron in it. It helped my MIL who broke her hips. She healed faster than the doctors expected. Boron helps to put calcium in the bones and keep it there. Of course research and check with the doc. :)

Thank you for the recommendation Everlasting Life! I'll have to look into boron as a supplement!
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Last year my DEXA scan showed osteopenia and early osteoporosis, so my doctor prescribed Boniva. Well, I did a little research and decided against taking it. My annual physical is next week and I figure I'm going to be "in trouble" for not starting the medicine. Now, my doctor is wonderful, so I don't mean any disrespect towards her; this is the standard recommendation, I'm sure.

I just wondered if any of you ladies (or even men) have dealt with this and what you do about it?
Vitamins D and K2 (in the form of MK-7) are vital for warding off both osteopenia and osteoporosis. You can supplement with calcium but, without D and K2, the calcium can and will collect in the soft tissue instead of the bones--which you don't want! Vitamin D helps you to absorb calcium and K2 and directs it to the bones instead of having it collect elsewhere. By the way, K2 will direct the calcium to the teeth as well--which are living tissue, unless they have died because of decay or dental procedures. Magnesium is also important to the process of building bone (which goes on constantly).
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
I forgot to add that the peak of bone density and strength is at about the age of 35 and it declines from there. The time of building the most strength and density is the teen years. Since drinking alcohol and/or smoking both impede the process of bone-building, teens should be strongly discouraged from either habit so that they can maximize their bones.
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the recommendation Everlasting Life! I'll have to look into boron as a supplement
You want to be careful about supplementation with trace minerals. In general, it is best to get trace minerals from food. Sufficient boron is easily available through eating a wide variety of whole fruits, vegetables, legumes and tree nuts, such as avocados, apricots, organic apples, Brazil nuts (which are also excellent for supplying the vital trace mineral of selenium) almonds, dates, peanuts, raisins, prunes, chick peas and lentils. In saying that, it is important to use organic or as pure as possible. Some fruits and vegetables do not have much in the way of pesticides put on them--such as avocados for example, but conventional apples and strawberries have a lot. It is important to avoid anything that has been dosed with glyphosate because it interferes with the proper absorption of nutrients--and it is now being put on legumes and wheat in order to kill the legume plants and wheat plants in order to facilitate drying in the field.

It has been shown that a level of 3 mg. of boron per day is important to the proper functioning of vitamin D and the absorption of calcium and magnesium--that part is true. Because of our highly processed diet which contains disproportionate amounts of wheat starch and sugar (both of which are stripped of nutrients) we tend to be deficient in "macro-minerals" (which we need in large amounts) as well as trace minerals. Even then, the average diet (devoid of fruits and vegetables) still yields about 1 mg. of boron per day. And it is possible, with supplementation, that we can throw off the absorption and utilization of other trace nutrients. Unfortunately, there are unscrupulous manufacturers in the marketplace who either skip any effective amounts of a substance or put in huge overdoses of a substance!
 

Leigh

Well-Known Member
Vitamins D and K2 (in the form of MK-7) are vital for warding off both osteopenia and osteoporosis. You can supplement with calcium but, without D and K2, the calcium can and will collect in the soft tissue instead of the bones--which you don't want! Vitamin D helps you to absorb calcium and K2 and directs it to the bones instead of having it collect elsewhere. By the way, K2 will direct the calcium to the teeth as well--which are living tissue, unless they have died because of decay or dental procedures. Magnesium is also important to the process of building bone (which goes on constantly).
Thanks for all the info, Wings Like Eagles!!

I've been taking 5000 IU of D3 for a few years now, and last summer added the MK-7. I don't normally take calcium, even though that is a standard recommendation. My doctors never mention taking magnesium along with it, although it should be 2:1 Ca:Mg.

Another thing I've read about that's purported to help is silica (sometimes in the form of food-grade diatomaceous earth). Have you heard anything about that?
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Thanks for all the info, Wings Like Eagles!!

I've been taking 5000 IU of D3 for a few years now, and last summer added the MK-7. I don't normally take calcium, even though that is a standard recommendation. My doctors never mention taking magnesium along with it, although it should be 2:1 Ca:Mg.

Another thing I've read about that's purported to help is silica (sometimes in the form of food-grade diatomaceous earth). Have you heard anything about that?
In terms of supplementation, the FDA recommends no more than approximately 10 mg. per day, with the upper limit of 30 mg. Silica is available in most fruits and vegetables--string beans are the most rich in silica. An average serving of string beans yields about 7 mg. of silica--but most fruit, vegetables and whole grain have some. Oatmeal is another outstanding source with the average serving yielding about 10 mg. Another source of silica is in the form of silicon dioxide which is often present in soups and gravies in addition to being used as an excipient in various tablets. I would avoid taking diatomaceous earth because it acts as an "anti-nutrient" in the gut. Most dietary silica is complexed in proteins and has accompanying "co-factors" so, imo, that is the better way to get silica.

I am generally against supplementation unless you KNOW you are deficient in a specific nutrient and cannot reasonably be able to get it in food--such as the need for supplementation of vitamin D3--especially during the winter months. The same is true of K2. The only good natural source is the Japanese natto and it is well...not exactly something that pleases the Western palate (if you go on the web and look it up, you will see why). So, a great many people are deficient in K2 here in N. America. I personally think that the general deficiency of K2 may be contributing to bleeding disorders and clotting problems that are being seen in a LOT of the elderly these days.
 

Leigh

Well-Known Member
In terms of supplementation, the FDA recommends no more than approximately 10 mg. per day, with the upper limit of 30 mg. Silica is available in most fruits and vegetables--string beans are the most rich in silica. An average serving of string beans yields about 7 mg. of silica--but most fruit, vegetables and whole grain have some. Oatmeal is another outstanding source with the average serving yielding about 10 mg. Another source of silica is in the form of silicon dioxide which is often present in soups and gravies in addition to being used as an excipient in various tablets. I would avoid taking diatomaceous earth because it acts as an "anti-nutrient" in the gut. Most dietary silica is complexed in proteins and has accompanying "co-factors" so, imo, that is the better way to get silica.

I am generally against supplementation unless you KNOW you are deficient in a specific nutrient and cannot reasonably be able to get it in food--such as the need for supplementation of vitamin D3--especially during the winter months. The same is true of K2. The only good natural source is the Japanese natto and it is well...not exactly something that pleases the Western palate (if you go on the web and look it up, you will see why). So, a great many people are deficient in K2 here in N. America. I personally think that the general deficiency of K2 may be contributing to bleeding disorders and clotting problems that are being seen in a LOT of the elderly these days.
I really appreciate you taking the time to answer so thoroughly! :hug
 

Psalm37v4

Well-Known Member
Both my parents had Osteoporosis, so I got a double dose when i was born. :ahaha
Up until 2 weeks ago I was a pedestrian for 30+ years. I have major knee pain, especially the right one. I take Vitamin D3 (5,000), Glucosamine & Chondroitin, and Turmeric and Curcumin. Lately my right knee has ached in spite of all of this. I will NOT take over the counter or prescription meds when there are safe, practical supplements available!
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Both my parents had Osteoporosis, so I got a double dose when i was born. :ahaha
Up until 2 weeks ago I was a pedestrian for 30+ years. I have major knee pain, especially the right one. I take Vitamin D3 (5,000), Glucosamine & Chondroitin, and Turmeric and Curcumin. Lately my right knee has ached in spite of all of this. I will NOT take over the counter or prescription meds when there are safe, practical supplements available!
The problem isn't always nutritional--especially when only one side of the body is affected. You might want to check out hip alignment. The psoas muscle in the hip, becomes shortened in adults, because we tend to sit so much. When the psoas muscle is not stretched routinely (and a physiotherapist is one who is trained to evaluate this condition) it puts an unnatural strain all the way to the foot. Often, it is so bad in women (because of the sharper angle of the femur from hip to knee in women) that the AC ligament (the one on the inside of the knee) is under constant stress as well as the ligaments on the outside of the ankle. This, in turn, inflames the knee joint capsule and causes further mechanical dysfunction of the joint, which causes further pain, inflammation, etc. You will often see little girls compensating for their wider hip to length of femur (yes, girls are built differently and are built less sturdily than are boys at every age). When little girls sit on the floor, you will often see them compensating for this hip-knee problem by sitting with their lower legs bent backward (knees forward, with feet on either side of their hips). They should be discouraged from sitting this way and be taken to a physiotherapist for evaluation. A good physiotherapist will be able to recommend strengthening and stretching exercises to correct the problem. This problem is so prevalent in women that women athletes have over 10 times the number of ACL tears as male athletes.
 

RobinB

Well-Known Member
I take Vit D, calcium and collagen. Years ago I was prescribed fosamax, but I didn't take it very long after I heard of some negative side effects.

I don't always do what the doctor suggests. My doc wanted me to take an aspirin a day. I don't do it. Aspirin is one thing I know about that can cause tinnitus. My tinnitus is already too disruptive in my life. I don't need it to be worse. There are other Rx's over the years that I have declined to take. I tend to research things.

I definitely notice my ears ring more if I take an aspirin.
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Both my parents had Osteoporosis, so I got a double dose when i was born. :ahaha
Up until 2 weeks ago I was a pedestrian for 30+ years. I have major knee pain, especially the right one. I take Vitamin D3 (5,000), Glucosamine & Chondroitin, and Turmeric and Curcumin. Lately my right knee has ached in spite of all of this. I will NOT take over the counter or prescription meds when there are safe, practical supplements available!
You can try MSM (methylsulfonylmethane). It is anti-inflammatory and a cheap supplement. It has proven to be safe in amounts up to 6,000 mg. per day but few people take that much and I wouldn't do so except under the supervision of a naturopath. I take 1000 mg. per day (500 mg. at breakfast and 500 mg. at dinner--you should take it with food) and it seems to control the osteoarthritis in my right shoulder and both hands--I notice when I don't take it for a few days. A lot of glucosamine/chondroitin supplements contain MSM. It contributes sulfur to the body, which, because our farm soils are sulfur-deficient, is in short supply. Whole eggs are a good source of choline (needed for detoxification of heavy metals among other toxic substances) and a reasonable source of sulfur, if the chickens are well-nourished.
 

Psalm37v4

Well-Known Member
The problem isn't always nutritional--especially when only one side of the body is affected. You might want to check out hip alignment. The psoas muscle in the hip, becomes shortened in adults, because we tend to sit so much. When the psoas muscle is not stretched routinely (and a physiotherapist is one who is trained to evaluate this condition) it puts an unnatural strain all the way to the foot. Often, it is so bad in women (because of the sharper angle of the femur from hip to knee in women) that the AC ligament (the one on the inside of the knee) is under constant stress as well as the ligaments on the outside of the ankle. This, in turn, inflames the knee joint capsule and causes further mechanical dysfunction of the joint, which causes further pain, inflammation, etc. You will often see little girls compensating for their wider hip to length of femur (yes, girls are built differently and are built less sturdily than are boys at every age). When little girls sit on the floor, you will often see them compensating for this hip-knee problem by sitting with their lower legs bent backward (knees forward, with feet on either side of their hips). They should be discouraged from sitting this way and be taken to a physiotherapist for evaluation. A good physiotherapist will be able to recommend strengthening and stretching exercises to correct the problem. This problem is so prevalent in women that women athletes have over 10 times the number of ACL tears as male athletes.
I wish I could have my hips or knees checked but, bc I'm overweight, they won't do surgery. I weigh about 225 when I should weigh 120, and one doctor suggested I get "stomach surgery" to curb my appetite. (Not about to do that after seeing how some gained the weight back, and one person died shortly afterward.) Since I have to be available 24/7 for my mom, I can't have surgery anyway. I wish SO MUCH the Lord would heal me!
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
I wish I could have my hips or knees checked but, bc I'm overweight, they won't do surgery. I weigh about 225 when I should weigh 120, and one doctor suggested I get "stomach surgery" to curb my appetite. (Not about to do that after seeing how some gained the weight back, and one person died shortly afterward.) Since I have to be available 24/7 for my mom, I can't have surgery anyway. I wish SO MUCH the Lord would heal me!
You might be surprised by how much better your weight-bearing joints feel if you were able to lose just ten pounds. I know a lady who lost 100+ pounds with intermittent fasting and a low-starch/no-added-sugar diet. Try to eat just eggs, meat, fish and vegetables for a while. You'll be amazed at how cutting out wheat starch and sugary foods will go toward curbing your appetite. (Starchy and sugary foods spike insulin and it is high insulin that spurs unnatural appetite.) There's all kinds of videos on the web about intermittent fasting. Dr. Jason Fung's videos are some of the best.
 

Patiently...

Well-Known Member
Last year my DEXA scan showed osteopenia and early osteoporosis, so my doctor prescribed Boniva. Well, I did a little research and decided against taking it. My annual physical is next week and I figure I'm going to be "in trouble" for not starting the medicine. Now, my doctor is wonderful, so I don't mean any disrespect towards her; this is the standard recommendation, I'm sure.

I just wondered if any of you ladies (or even men) have dealt with this and what you do about it?
I experienced practically exactly what you described. I wouldn't take the pill either. My doctor prescribed fosamax. I just told her no thank you. I haven't had another test yet and it has been f years, so I'm pretty sure she'll be bringing it up again. I just ordered EL's bone maximizer from Amazon also. I chuckled when I read down the thread and found you also did.
 
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