Ordered a New Laptop

3 Nails 4 Given

Sinner saved by the blood of Jesus
If I was in that situation of only being able to buy a PC about every 12 years, I'd probably call it my jubilee year. I'm quite frugal, by nature, but after personal computers got created, that's one item I've spent a fortune on, for myself, and then for my family members as they came along.
It wouldn’t matter what PC, laptop or processor I could own, my internet service is so bad my download or streaming speeds are so slow they’re measured in negative bits per year:chatter
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
I'm about 90% complete with setting the new laptop up. It's quite nice to have the disk space that it provides me. That's been the most difficult requirement for me to fulfill when shopping for laptops. The screen resolution is quite high compared to the normal and some of my older apps don't present themselves too well on it. I'll upgrade some of those apps and live with some of the others that I don't use as often, I guess.

It's not a flex style or two in one, but the monitor does fold perfectly flat which will make it easy if I want to hook it up to some larger monitor(s).

One negative is the bottom left control key is on the inside of the fn key which is the opposite of probably all of the laptops I've had in the last 20 years or so. It'll take some time to retrain my fingers for that change.

It's a slow booting laptop compared to what I might expect from a 10th gen. It takes around 15 seconds to boot. I would have hoped for maybe half that time. The 11 gen chips make it easy for computer builders to provide fast boot and fast wake-up times. Wake-up is pretty much instantaneous, which is a little better than I expected with this CPU.

The keyboard has a really nice feel to it... and the Thinkpad red button in the middle of the keyboard is low profile and thus out of my way. I see no obvious way to disable the trackpad with an fn key so I'll have to google that and see what I come up with.

I've not had time to test battery life yet, but with all the hardware that's built into this thing, I don't expect a long battery life, though that would be a plus.

because it didn't have the latest Microsoft build already on it, I had no problem figuring out how to set up an account with just my first name. It's the latest build that makes that impossible unless you disconnect it from the internet when setting up the user account.
 

sawas

Well-Known Member
@Tall Timbers I can't type worth beans on any laptop...so accustomed to my "ergonomic keyboard" that even a normal "straight" one is disorienting. If forced to actually write at length on the 2-in-1 I recently purchased, I'm sure I'd have to plug in a spare. I don't recall reading whether this is your "primary" computer? If so, I assume it's handier for you since it seems you travel with some frequency.
 

DanLMP

Well-Known Member
It's a slow booting laptop compared to what I might expect from a 10th gen. It takes around 15 seconds to boot. I would have hoped for maybe half that time. The 11 gen chips make it easy for computer builders to provide fast boot and fast wake-up times. Wake-up is pretty much instantaneous, which is a little better than I expected with this CPU.

Are you complaining or bragging?:tappingfoot
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
Are you complaining or bragging?:tappingfoot
Did you hear the news, TT bought a high end computer.... :biggrin

Im glad you all know how it all works with all that tech, and if I had a need for that much power, I would also get a really good one.

I hope TT gets years of good usage out of that contraption.

I have no doubt an IPAD is all I will ever use for the remainder of our time here.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
Are you complaining or bragging?:tappingfoot

Not bragging :). Complaining about the boot time, yes. Other things are just observations. Usually I get to see and touch a laptop before I buy the model. This one was site unseen because I found myself in a pickle and had to get a replacement quickly and I couldn't find an appropriate one from my usual sources. Normally I buy them during the fall sales and after more models get the higher end chip of whatever generation intel cpu is selling. When I'm looking at them in the stores I turn them off and back on and time the boot time because that's important to me. Frankly, I would pass on a laptop that took 15 seconds to boot. Right now I'd be hoping for half that time. That said, the POST for this particular laptop understandably takes a little longer and the instant on from sleep mode is testament to a laptop well done... The PC/Windows cabal has been working towards instant access/availability so with each new laptop I expect a shorter boot time. So I'm disappointed in that one thing. I share for those who might be interested in such stuff. I've followed the PC market developments for decades now, both for work and hobby. When a new intel generation of cpus debuts, I examine the specs. Intel has nearly killed off the competition several times, but every time Intel gets way ahead they become complacent and slow down their advancements. Now they're behind in some ways and may never catch up in those areas. Their business model would have kept them healthier if it pushed research and development as if their existence depended upon it, and pricing that wouldn't push too many over to the competition.

As an investor which has been my primary life's work in terms of providing, my primary focus was on tech companies because of my interest. I was studying companies like IBM, Micron, Nvidia, Maxtor, Connor Peripherals, Borland, Corel, and Vishay Intertechnology and many others and investing in the ones I thought would do well.

So, I share the details because I have a strong interest, and in the rare times that another member shares the specs on a new computer purchase, I'm all over that thread interest-wise. There's rarely a time when I'm not researching technology on someone's behalf. Here in Fairbanks there are a lot of people who will purchase whatever I suggest, and then I also support them as their tech guy. It's something I enjoy quite a bit. One of the challenges for me is making recommendations based on both the needs and financial ability of the person I'm helping versus recommending what I would want. I was going to start a technology company when I returned to Alaska 20 years ago but a gal who what agreed to be my business partner backed out... and I needed her skill sets. So I just do pro-bono and enjoy helping people anyway I can, so I'm blessed by my efforts. My motto is "best bang for the buck", meaning I'll see to it that the customer gets the best laptop for the amount of money they have to put out for it. So, like I told my family last night, usually I'm happy when I get a new laptop but this time, because of the cost of the critter, the usual pleasure of having a new toy isn't there. I just got something I needed. I'm very cost conscious and try to stretch every dollar that comes my way. This purchase was different because instead of stretching the dollars they were shortened, and that goes against my grain majorly.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
@Tall Timbers I can't type worth beans on any laptop...so accustomed to my "ergonomic keyboard" that even a normal "straight" one is disorienting. If forced to actually write at length on the 2-in-1 I recently purchased, I'm sure I'd have to plug in a spare. I don't recall reading whether this is your "primary" computer? If so, I assume it's handier for you since it seems you travel with some frequency.

It's going to be my primary computer. It'll be the first time that a laptop is my primary. I still have what was my "primary" desktop downstairs but I all but quit using it because it was getting old and it's cold downstairs. So I was using the desktop that was my wife's primary desktop (poor gal). I also used a laptop a lot because I'm often going around to assist people and some businesses, and I have a lot of tools on the laptop that help me provide support. And as you mentioned, in recent years I've started traveling a lot to the laptop would become primary during the travels.

Instead of storing my data files on the computers themselves, when home I was accessing them from whatever computer I was using in the house by storing the data on a NAS which is essentially a storage system attached to our network. My NAS currently has an 8 TB capacity which is enough with some room to spare. When I was going to use the laptop I would replicate my main data files to the laptop from the NAS and if I changed any files or added any I'd then copy those new/updated files to the NAS.

A few weeks ago my wife's desktop died and I wasn't interested in fixing it because it was pretty old. I convinced her to get a laptop because these days you can get more computer for the money with a laptop than desktop. Desktop prices have gone up (for one that's not junk) because there's not a lot of them selling these days while laptops have become quite popular. I started using what was then my laptop which was pretty old as my primary computer. I had planned to purchase something to replace it this fall as I've found Oct/Nov to be one of the better times of the year to purchase a laptop. So I purchased this Thinkpad that this thread is about and it will be my primary computer. So now, my primary data repository will be the Thinkpad and the NAS and an additional exterior hard drive will be my data backups.

I can type well on a laptop with a 15.6" screen or larger. I used to buy laptops with the 17" screen but hauling one of those around while traveling isn't fun. If it's smaller than 15.6" I also have a hard time with the keyboards. I can't type at all with those ergonomic keyboards. It drives me crazy when I'm providing support to someone who has one of those. What's the screen size of your 2in1? What brand and model? Do you attach an ergonomic keyboard to it?

Time well tell, but I might need to plug in to a large monitor or two with the laptop. I used to do a lot of work with graphics when designing webpages, and I'd have a jillion windows open. Plus I would need to be able to see the details of the images easily, sometimes down to the individual pixel level. On a 15.6" screen, that would be difficult. But I don't do much of that nowadays so it might not be an issue. As our family desktops end up in the trash heap of history I've got a lot of really nice flat screen monitors that still have a lot of life in them. Docking stations are our friends :).
 

DanLMP

Well-Known Member
Frankly, I would pass on a laptop that took 15 seconds to boot. Right now I'd be hoping for half that time.

I'm looking to replace my wife's laptop with a midrange Dell. My laptop is one of the higher end HP's with a SSD.

I have become jaded by my SSD. Comparative boot time to an old fangled disc type hard drive is significant. I have not bothered to time my boot time because however long it takes is fast enough for me. It's definitely less than 30 sec, maybe as fast as 15 sec.

I was ribbing you because we as a society sometimes take our technology for granted without a comparison to what we used to use.

It used to be that people would turn their computer on and then walk away to go do something else for the several minutes it would take to boot up.

I enjoy the progress that has been made in many areas of technology but it's a shame that mankind frequently finds ways to misuse that new technology.

I am hoping that eventually in my 2.0 body that the only computer and memory storage I'll require will reside in my brain. I don't know what we'll do for a display. Maybe God will install a HUD.
 

sawas

Well-Known Member
It's going to be my primary computer. It'll be the first time that a laptop is my primary. I still have what was my "primary" desktop downstairs but I all but quit using it because it was getting old and it's cold downstairs. So I was using the desktop that was my wife's primary desktop (poor gal). I also used a laptop a lot because I'm often going around to assist people and some businesses, and I have a lot of tools on the laptop that help me provide support. And as you mentioned, in recent years I've started traveling a lot to the laptop would become primary during the travels.

Instead of storing my data files on the computers themselves, when home I was accessing them from whatever computer I was using in the house by storing the data on a NAS which is essentially a storage system attached to our network. My NAS currently has an 8 TB capacity which is enough with some room to spare. When I was going to use the laptop I would replicate my main data files to the laptop from the NAS and if I changed any files or added any I'd then copy those new/updated files to the NAS.

A few weeks ago my wife's desktop died and I wasn't interested in fixing it because it was pretty old. I convinced her to get a laptop because these days you can get more computer for the money with a laptop than desktop. Desktop prices have gone up (for one that's not junk) because there's not a lot of them selling these days while laptops have become quite popular. I started using what was then my laptop which was pretty old as my primary computer. I had planned to purchase something to replace it this fall as I've found Oct/Nov to be one of the better times of the year to purchase a laptop. So I purchased this Thinkpad that this thread is about and it will be my primary computer. So now, my primary data repository will be the Thinkpad and the NAS and an additional exterior hard drive will be my data backups.

I can type well on a laptop with a 15.6" screen or larger. I used to buy laptops with the 17" screen but hauling one of those around while traveling isn't fun. If it's smaller than 15.6" I also have a hard time with the keyboards. I can't type at all with those ergonomic keyboards. It drives me crazy when I'm providing support to someone who has one of those. What's the screen size of your 2in1? What brand and model? Do you attach an ergonomic keyboard to it?

Time well tell, but I might need to plug in to a large monitor or two with the laptop. I used to do a lot of work with graphics when designing webpages, and I'd have a jillion windows open. Plus I would need to be able to see the details of the images easily, sometimes down to the individual pixel level. On a 15.6" screen, that would be difficult. But I don't do much of that nowadays so it might not be an issue. As our family desktops end up in the trash heap of history I've got a lot of really nice flat screen monitors that still have a lot of life in them. Docking stations are our friends :).
I really thought that I'd get a dock for my last laptop but it never happened. Offered the same to the wife who now has it, but she seems content with it as is. Only rarely have I actually needed a laptop, obviously handy for travel, but it seems more likely now that I'll use it while watching TV in the evening and/or reading e-books, which is why I went with a 2-in-1 this go around. It's a 13 inch (which as you note complicates typing) but is bigger than most tablets. I guess that makes a 2-stones-in-1 machine, LOL. I never thought I'd adjust to e-books, but the lockdown has kept us out of the library, so there you go.

Edit (PS - The 2-in-1 is a Dell Latitude 7390, one step down from the XPS version I think, running an i7-8650U. In a pinch, I'm sure that I could set it up for remote recording and audio production. It spec'd out pretty close the Optiplex 9010 SFF desktop with an i7-3720QM that I'm getting ready to relegate to the shop. Like I think I noted earlier, the lingering desire for a desktop is related both to work issues and audio - DAW - production and the capability to run better CPUs with higher TDP. Pretty sure the upcoming replacement will be a used Optiplex 7060 SFF with an i7-8700.)

I think I mentioned earlier that I'm looking at doing some kind of HTPC; cord-cutting day is fast approaching it seems. Starting to look as if everyone I know has a Firestick or somesuch, but I'd much rather have full PC access to the web (and am not eager to have Alexa join the household). I've looked at NUC's for space saving, but am lately looking mostly at used Dell USFFs as a primary option. These uses (laptop and HTPC) have made me consider setting up a NAS, but I don't store that much beyond music, so I don't know. I assume you're recording movies and such?

So, the biggest deal for me with a desktop (beyond the keyboard issue) is running multiple - and as I get older -much bigger monitors. I seem to understand that both the HDMI and Thunderbolt outputs on my 2-in-1 can be rigged to run more than one monitor, but haven't really explored that in much depth. I'm more excited about the Thunderbolt option as, hopefully, it will open up more low-latency audio interface options. That's been a prohibitively expensive (for me) buggaboo for Windows machines and is preventing me from going all-in-the-box with audio recording applications.
 
Last edited:

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
I'm looking to replace my wife's laptop with a midrange Dell. My laptop is one of the higher end HP's with a SSD.

The SSDs are nice. The laptop I just replaced had an SSD to boot to then a 2 TB old fashion type drive as well. Personally SSDs are all I'd recommend to people now. Systems with a capacity of 512 GB on an SSD can be pretty inexpensive and the performance makes it worth it. SSD prices will hopefully continue to come down. I think the days of the old type drives are numbered.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
I think I mentioned earlier that I'm looking at doing some kind of HTPC; cord-cutting day is fast approaching it seems. Starting to look as if everyone I know has a Firestick or somesuch,

I've got a computer connected to a 55" screen via HDMI. I've got a few different browsers and each open up to different free movie and tv sources. One of our members here posted most of those links. You can stream just about anything except maybe the new stuff via the internet. In some cases you have to put up with a bunch of adds popping up before you get to the desired content.
 

sawas

Well-Known Member
I've got a computer connected to a 55" screen via HDMI. I've got a few different browsers and each open up to different free movie and tv sources. One of our members here posted most of those links. You can stream just about anything except maybe the new stuff via the internet. In some cases you have to put up with a bunch of adds popping up before you get to the desired content.
My wife, bless her heart (as southerners like to say), thinks our old 32" is just fine. I'm pretty sure that she'll be happy with a 40" when this one dies (with or without my help). But, for sure, I'm definitely ready to cut the cord and I think she is too.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
My wife, bless her heart (as southerners like to say), thinks our old 32" is just fine. I'm pretty sure that she'll be happy with a 40" when this one dies (with or without my help). But, for sure, I'm definitely ready to cut the cord and I think she is too.

For about 15 years we had our vhs machine connected to a 12" computer monitor from a commodore 64. Then I upgraded to a CRT display which fell and broke while I was cleaning. It was on a furniture piece with wheels that was too small for the display so it tipped easily and tipped and fell while I was cleaning. Then I bought our first flat screen...
 

sawas

Well-Known Member
I'm embarrassed to admit how long I kept a CRT, LOL. I'm running a 27" and a 24" now. Need to swap out the 24", it's a bit dark, but mostly it offends my OCD desire for symmetry. If I had the room, I could actually use a third one in the mix. Oh, is that 55" a monitor or TV?
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
I'm embarrassed to admit how long I kept a CRT, LOL. I'm running a 27" and a 24" now. Need to swap out the 24", it's a bit dark, but mostly it offends my OCD desire for symmetry. If I had the room, I could actually use a third one in the mix. Oh, is that 55" a monitor or TV?

It's probably a tv... but I use it as a monitor... I say probably because I'm not real familiar with what makes it a tv. The last place I lived in that had a tv where I could flip the channels was a black and white one with tubes in the back that we could replace when they fried.

One of the locals I provide IT support for runs a desktop with two screens that don't match. If I ran with two or three screens they would have to match and I'm not even OCD...
 
Top