Need some help with solid teaching resources

RonJohnSilver

Well-Known Member
I've been concerned for some time at the level of Biblical knowledge/wisdom/teaching that many believers have. Many are still at that 'milk' stage, at least in some areas of doctrine. I have this idea of putting together a list of the 'best', that is, most solid, doctrinally sound, useful, etc., books, teachings in the main doctrinal areas. My idea is still in the formative stage. What I envision is being able to give to my classes at church, a list of resources that would get them up to speed, so to speak, in the main doctrines of the church. Like, for example, the nature of God, salvation, spiritual gifts, the doctrine of sin, etc. Another use is that I want to have an easy to read and understand library of evangelistic stuff for whoever inhabits my house after I/we move on. When those unbelievers move in, I want them to find enough understandable stuff that they can become saved. I know there are some compilations on this forum so I'll check them as well. But, to start, what are your best, absolute best, to the point, clear, readable, resources on the various doctrines of the church. Here's what I've currently got from my own collection....
Things to Come...J. Dwight Pentecost....Best for current believers, a bit heavy for newbies.
Footsteps of the Messiah.....Arnold Fructenbaum....Better for newbies, good for current believers.
The Essential Guide to Bible Prophecy....Tim LaHaye/Ed Hindson.....Good for both....It's in.
Basic Theology.....Charles Ryrie....Good for believers, o.k. for newbies....Also in.
 

Everlasting Life

Through Faith in Jesus
Believer's Bible Commentary by William McDonald is excellent. Clearly readable, concise, theologically correct and dispensationally right on.

At the same time explains hard passages well along with showing good life application principles.

An older Halley's Bible Handbook (preferably from 1960's if you can find it) that has concise church history with the audacity to include how many millions of Christians were killed by the RCC. This has been wiped from newer editions. It tells what the popes were really like (not holy), how they lived and the various wars they instigated in Europe through the monarchs they exerted incredible control over (much European history of wars has more connections to angry popes than one may expect).

There's also archeological discoveries, how we got our bible and abbreviated commentary.

Evidence That Demands A Verdict by Josh McDowel is excellent. It's slightly text bookish but has a thorough, lawyer investigative aspect looking at evidence that points to Christ, His life by drawing from history, archeology, internal documents of scripture, etc. In addition common skeptical arguments are addressed along with so much more. This is a great resource book!
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
I like the above resources very much.

J Vernon McGee's commentaries are wonderful. His motto which I think he got from Billy Sunday was keep the cookies on the bottom shelf

meaning to keep the theology easy for the beginners and the young in faith to understand and absorb. I bought his Thru the Bible commentaries on Kindle, after I had borrowed some of the paper versions from a friend in order to help me teach the lady's Bible Study that I taught for years. Dispensational, good sound doctrine. Easy to understand.

Henry Newell's book on Romans is really good.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Although not a theological resource, the Big Wall Chart of World History: Facsimile Edition (Hull, published by Barnes and Noble) (1999) is an excellent resource to use when looking at Bible and Church history. Sadly, the last entry is 1997

Having two copies of this is nice because there's a lot of good information on the back of the loooooooooooooooooooooooooooooooong fold-out page. Cool to put both front and back on the wall :smile

Maps and globes get people staring for hours. This sucks people in for days and weeks and months :lol


(maybe) a later version (also published by Barnes and Noble and looks suspiciously similar with the same dimensions) (Gibbons) (2004) The Timechart History of the World: 6000 Years of World History Unfolded

NOTE: There are a coupe of reviews on Amazon of this that indicates the addition of millions of years or cave men etc, between Adam and Eve and The Flood. I haven't seen the product, so I don't know for sure.


(maybe) an even later version (Third Millennium Press, but found on Barnes and Noble website and has the same dimensions, and also on Amazon from Chartwell Press) ( (2018) Timechart History of the World


IF there's objectionable material before Noah in the later versions, maybe get an earlier version and the latest version, and then cut the later version and append the most recent years to the end of the older version.
 

RonJohnSilver

Well-Known Member
Wall charts? I hadn't thought of that. Thanks, Ghoti!
I like the above resources very much.

J Vernon McGee's commentaries are wonderful. His motto which I think he got from Billy Sunday was keep the cookies on the bottom shelf

meaning to keep the theology easy for the beginners and the young in faith to understand and absorb. I bought his Thru the Bible commentaries on Kindle, after I had borrowed some of the paper versions from a friend in order to help me teach the lady's Bible Study that I taught for years. Dispensational, good sound doctrine. Easy to understand.

Henry Newell's book on Romans is really good.
I have a kindle so JVMcGee's studies would be easy to add. And the Henry Morris Bible...I'll get that for myself for Christmas.
 

PhilR

Well-Known Member
My favorite is a small book or essay is called RIGHTLY DIVIDING THE WORD IN TRUTH, by C.I. Scofield. It clearly show the difference between law and grace in God's plan, and shows how God has dealt differently with different peoples in different ages.
 
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PhilR

Well-Known Member
I have a book that includes some excellent charts to help the reader understand the text of what is being presented. The book was written about 100 years ago and is called DISPENSATIONAL TRUTH, by Clarence Larkin.
 

Brother Albert R.

Jesus loved us and said we should Love our enemies
I've been concerned for some time at the level of Biblical knowledge/wisdom/teaching that many believers have. Many are still at that 'milk' stage, at least in some areas of doctrine. I have this idea of putting together a list of the 'best', that is, most solid, doctrinally sound, useful, etc., books, teachings in the main doctrinal areas. My idea is still in the formative stage. What I envision is being able to give to my classes at church, a list of resources that would get them up to speed, so to speak, in the main doctrines of the church. Like, for example, the nature of God, salvation, spiritual gifts, the doctrine of sin, etc. Another use is that I want to have an easy to read and understand library of evangelistic stuff for whoever inhabits my house after I/we move on. When those unbelievers move in, I want them to find enough understandable stuff that they can become saved. I know there are some compilations on this forum so I'll check them as well. But, to start, what are your best, absolute best, to the point, clear, readable, resources on the various doctrines of the church. Here's what I've currently got from my own collection....
Things to Come...J. Dwight Pentecost....Best for current believers, a bit heavy for newbies.
Footsteps of the Messiah.....Arnold Fructenbaum....Better for newbies, good for current believers.
The Essential Guide to Bible Prophecy....Tim LaHaye/Ed Hindson.....Good for both....It's in.
Basic Theology.....Charles Ryrie....Good for believers, o.k. for newbies....Also in.
The Canon of Scripture by F.F. Bruce; The New Testament Documents Are They Reliable by F.F. Bruce
 

lamonte

Well-Known Member
Those are all good books you have read. When we Home Schooled are kids I used a book called "Bible Doctrine for Today" by Michael C. Bere by "ABeka Book". The book is simple and to the point, there Doctrinal statement is close to the "rapture form". The book is little costly $28 through ABeka but it is worth it. I refer to this book a lot.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
Was that Henry Newell or William R. Newell? :noidea2 I keep thinking William. My copy is in a box somewhere.
Had to go check, it is William R Newell, Romans Verse by Verse. I love that book.
Those are all good books you have read. When we Home Schooled are kids I used a book called "Bible Doctrine for Today" by Michael C. Bere by "ABeka Book". The book is simple and to the point, there Doctrinal statement is close to the "rapture form". The book is little costly $28 through ABeka but it is worth it. I refer to this book a lot.
YAY another home schooler! Or as I like to call us, Books R US! :biggrin
 

crossnote

fully dependent upon His grace
I was blessed reading Israelology: The Missing Link in Systematic Theology by Arnold Fruchtenbaum
(and Israel truly is a missing link ignored by so many systematic theologians).

 
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