My friend has just started dating a catholic... how's that going to work out?

amystery

Well-Known Member
My friend just started dating a catholic, a practicing catholic. He's a good old fashioned Baptist, and has no intention of ever becoming catholic, and it sounds like she's not planning on becoming Baptist any time soon either. I know little about catholicism, nothing much more than what we see in movies and hear just in general life. All I really know is there's way too much emphasis on Mary and the pope and it seems they're all about works. It seems to me that this is going down a road that just may be headed towards a dead end, but I'd love to know what you'd tell your friend in this situation. He has asked me what I think and what I know, so I'm trying to do some research and thought I would start here for info that I trust!
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
Somewhere recently I read that about 25% of catholics are saved. I believe that. I think there is often a difference between a person's personal faith and the denomination/non-denomination that they attend. Faith in Christ and religion aren't quite the same thing... 25% probably beats a lot of individual protestant churches.

If they're both saved, it could work out.

If neither are saved, oh well. If neither are saved and one or both is quite religious they'll definitely have a difficult time.

If one is saved and the other isn't hopefully the one who is saved takes the advice given us in the Bible about not entering into a mismatch in marriage.
 

Annie

Be A Berean!
It's going to be a difficult road imo. It used to be that the non Catholic had to convert to the Catholic belief should they choose to marry. Also that the children be raised Catholic. Regardless, a "different Jesus" is worshipped in the Catholic system.
 
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ShilohRose

Well-Known Member
I sure hope your friend puts the breaks on this relationship pronto. It's a bad situation-- speaking from experience here. Just don't. Your friend shouldn't put himself in a situation where he might be tempted into marrying someone who does not believe like he does. I learned that the hard way.
 

Xenosjeff

Well-Known Member
Oil and water. The two do not mix. One party at least must be left in ignorance to avoid controversy. If either party decides to "save" the other you will drive the conversation to the polar opposite and pre-packaged apologist answers. There is a whole industry of wannabe super snarky and prideful catholic writers and bloggers just waiting to escort the questioning catholic back across the Tiber. They will also throw up a wall against anyone who questions their invalid authority claims, saying garbage like " Rome gave us the Bible". "Jesus gave the keys to Peter", and so on and on.
It's all designed to run you in a circle without ever getting to the root of the problem. Everything that Rome claims all dies without using their own formulas. The three leg stool analogy. Their program only computes when you swallow the authority of the magisterium and tradition in ADDITION to the Bible. You go by the Bible? Then their story flops.

That's the basics.

Jeff
 

RonJohnSilver

Well-Known Member
As my pastor has often said to the youth..."You marry who you date". My sister, a Baptist, married a Catholic and they were married till he died so that's good but neither was particularly steady or fervent in their beliefs and their son is now Catholic. My BIL may have been saved, but, with Catholics it's hard to know at least as much as we can.
 

Goodboy

Won't Be Long Now!
My friend just started dating a catholic, a practicing catholic. He's a good old fashioned Baptist, and has no intention of ever becoming catholic, and it sounds like she's not planning on becoming Baptist any time soon either. I know little about catholicism, nothing much more than what we see in movies and hear just in general life. All I really know is there's way too much emphasis on Mary and the pope and it seems they're all about works. It seems to me that this is going down a road that just may be headed towards a dead end, but I'd love to know what you'd tell your friend in this situation. He has asked me what I think and what I know, so I'm trying to do some research and thought I would start here for info that I trust!
My advice would be for both of them to give up the "denomination thing" and not be considered a Baptist or a Catholic, just a saved Christian. Then they could just go to any Christian church that they both like.
 

3 Nails 4 Given

Sinner saved by the blood of Jesus
“Do not be unequally yoked together with unbelievers. For what fellowship has righteousness with lawlessness? And what communion has light with darkness?”
‭‭II Corinthians‬ ‭6:14‬ ‭NKJV‬‬
https://www.bible.com/114/2co.6.14.nkjv

Like Shiloh Rose said, Don’t. I did and I learned the truth to this scripture the hard way, the same way I learn most of the others the hard way.

The oil and water analogy was exactly what I was going to use. That is another excellent example.

My sister’s second husband was a Catholic and she is Southern Baptist. He had no problems converting to Southern Baptist. He was saved and Baptized. After having a daughter with her, they stayed married about 6 years then divorced.

He wanted to move back home to Boston, so they moved up there. After two winters up there and him being a deadbeat. She left him. When he got back home he wanted to go back to the Catholic Church. This became a major source of disagreement in a already dis functional family.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
Several have posted about being unequally yoked, but we were never told of either party's relationship to Christ. Neither may be his. Both may be his. Maybe one is his and one is not. On this Board most of us should understand that religion and a relationship with Jesus Christ are two very different things.
 

Shonsu

Borg # 8675309
Somewhere recently I read that about 25% of catholics are saved. I believe that. I think there is often a difference between a person's personal faith and the denomination/non-denomination that they attend. Faith in Christ and religion aren't quite the same thing... 25% probably beats a lot of individual protestant churches.

If they're both saved, it could work out.

If neither are saved, oh well. If neither are saved and one or both is quite religious they'll definitely have a difficult time.

If one is saved and the other isn't hopefully the one who is saved takes the advice given us in the Bible about not entering into a mismatch in marriage.

The problem with that is that Roman Catholicism follows a false Christ. Unless a person renounces the RC Jesus and gets out of it then they are still headed for hell. One can't be saved and stay in it and follow that Jesus. It's the same as with the Jehovah's Witnesses. They believe in Jesus as well and some have placed all of their faith in that Jesus. Can we say that they are saved too? Absolutely not. It's a false Christ who can't save them.
 

cheeky200386

Well-Known Member
Your friend needs to RUN! Why bother dating someone in a false religion if your friend is saved? I once had a friend who tried to justify dating non-believers as a mission to save them. I just reminded them of scripture saying we are not to be unequally yoked and told them not to equate their feelings with God's will. He makes it clear in his word.
 

lismore

Well-Known Member
The problem with that is that Roman Catholicism follows a false Christ. Unless a person renounces the RC Jesus and gets out of it then they are still headed for hell. One can't be saved and stay in it and follow that Jesus. It's the same as with the Jehovah's Witnesses. They believe in Jesus as well and some have placed all of their faith in that Jesus. Can we say that they are saved too? Absolutely not. It's a false Christ who can't save them.

Hello Shonsu. What you have posted is correct. The RCC have a different bible, a different gospel (salvation by works) and a different source of authority for what they do. This isn't a controversial statement, it can be seen clearly in the Catechism. However what Tall Timbers has posted is actually true as well, coming from an RC family myself way back, strangely there are some in the church who are born again but for whatever reason choose to remain there, perhaps not in full agreement with what the church teaches. My late grandmother was one such. There are family pressures on members of the RCC, if a person leaves their own family might disown them. The OP is extremely difficult to answer IMO, but potentially it could be leading to significant difficulties ahead. God Bless :)
 

Shonsu

Borg # 8675309
Hello Shonsu. What you have posted is correct. The RCC have a different bible, a different gospel (salvation by works) and a different source of authority for what they do. This isn't a controversial statement, it can be seen clearly in the Catechism. However what Tall Timbers has posted is actually true as well, coming from an RC family myself way back, strangely there are some in the church who are born again but for whatever reason choose to remain there, perhaps not in full agreement with what the church teaches. My late grandmother was one such. There are family pressures on members of the RCC, if a person leaves their own family might disown them. The OP is extremely difficult to answer IMO, but potentially it could be leading to significant difficulties ahead. God Bless :)

"He who loves father or mother more than Me is not worthy of Me. And he who loves son or daughter more than Me is not worthy of Me." Matthew 10:37

I think one of the largest stumbling blocks to faith in Christ is false Christianity. So many are deceived. Of course, God is going to have to be the one to sort out who truly has come to faith in the correct Jesus. I just know that the one of Roman Catholisicm is false and can't save anyone.
 

cheeky200386

Well-Known Member
Agreed :) I find it difficult to understand why anyone would be saved and remain within the RCC, but I occasionally have met them :)

I've only met those that don't know their Bibles. They express being intimidated by their Bibles and thus don't grow in understanding and discernment. They only a works based Gospel. I had one Catholic lady who I shared the Gospel with and who found relief when she learned how simple it was. Yet she stayed in her church because she didn't think she could understand her Bible. I gave a study bible and tried my best to warn her of the works based teachings. It was really sad.

I'm glad I at least emphasized Bible over man made traditions. She seemed to accept that but didn't go further.
 

seated with Christ

Well-Known Member
My younger brother married his Catholic girlfriend, he had to convert before they married and I sensed in my spirit that she was like Gary was a trophy stolen from our Baptist family. I believe that she or he (I forget) should nip it in the bud for freedom in Christ. :)
 

FaithnHope

Loved and changed by Jesus.
One of my best friends is a saved Catholic and another is an unsaved Catholic. The saved one goes because it’s all she has ever known. She has big issues with the church and I believe it’s why the Lord sent her into my life. Her priest sounds a lot like good pastors we’ve had.

My other friend is very works based and talks a lot about earning your way into Heaven. She’s given up on converting me but isn’t interested in grace over works. We’ve agreed to not talk about it much. I just pray the Lord opens her eyes because she tries so hard.

I love the Lord and won’t be joining their cult. I also know I have a job here with these 2 lovely ladies and the Lord has placed me in their lives for a reason. I will leave the judging up to Him.

Dating and marriage are a whole other ballgame. Is she saved? Is he saved? If so, I’m with @Goodboy, they need to find a good church they can both go to.
 
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