Matthew 10:23 question

mattfivefour

Administrator
Staff member
Possibly. And possibly not. This is one of the most difficult of Jesus' sayings to interpret. As evidence, go through the multiplicity of Bible commentaries online and read the many varying interpretations. I lean toward a couple of them, but I have not settled on any myself. The two most likely, in my estimation, are 1) a reference to the coming of Christ's judgment on Jerusalem in 70 AD; and 2) a reference to the coming of Christ at the end of the Great Tribulation when Jewish evangelism by the Jews themselves has been taking place throughout Israel.

But I'm still open to all the others. The way I look at it is this: if God wants me to know the answer, He will show me, just as He has eventually given me answers to other tough biblical questions in the past.
 

twerpv

Well-Known Member
Possibly. And possibly not. This is one of the most difficult of Jesus' sayings to interpret. As evidence, go through the multiplicity of Bible commentaries online and read the many varying interpretations. I lean toward a couple of them, but I have not settled on any myself. The two most likely, in my estimation, are 1) a reference to the coming of Christ's judgment on Jerusalem in 70 AD; and 2) a reference to the coming of Christ at the end of the Great Tribulation when Jewish evangelism by the Jews themselves has been taking place throughout Israel.

But I'm still open to all the others. The way I look at it is this: if God wants me to know the answer, He will show me, just as He has eventually given me answers to other tough biblical questions in the past.
Thank you for the reply! And I appreciate your honesty. Helps us ‘laymen’ understand that God will reveal to us His Word when He is ready.
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
What does it mean in the last part of the verse:

“….Truly I tell you, you will not finish going through the towns of Israel before the Son of Man comes.”

Was He referencing the crucifixion and rise from the dead relating to when he “comes”?
When one looks at the entire context of chapter 10, Jesus seems to be warning of and preparing His Jewish disciples for the persecution that is coming their way and all the way into the future when "all Israel will be saved" (see Romans 11:25-26). Even today, Messianic Jews face persecution from the enemies of Christ--from all unbelievers--Messianics are hated by many of the Jews in Israel. Of the estimated 250,000 Jewish believers in Jesus throughout Europe before WWII, only a small handful survived to make aliyah to the newly formed Israel. Since Matthew is considered to be the gospel to the Jews, it makes sense that the time between His first and second advents would be collapsed inward, because He said that the Jews would not see Him again until they shout, "Baruch haba b'shem Adonai!" (Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord!"--Psalm 118:26). He reiterates some of the same thinking at the end of Matthew 23, as He grieves over Jerusalem and pronounces judgment. It is then, at the second advent that "all Israel will be saved" and "the house of David" will be plunged into mourning (see Zechariah 12).
 
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