MARVEL movies

Mozie

New Member
Has anyone else made a connection between what Hollywood is show casing and what we read in the book of revelations? It's like so many things it can't be coincidental.... If you're interested watch "End game" In the first scene the guys family disappears out of no-where and no-where to be seen.... And much more....
 

yrrek

Well-Known Member
Has anyone else made a connection between what Hollywood is show casing and what we read in the book of revelations? It's like so many things it can't be coincidental.... If you're interested watch "End game" In the first scene the guys family disappears out of no-where and no-where to be seen.... And much more....
The only difference being that Thanos clearly says the people who vanish don’t die or go anywhere... they just simply don’t exist anymore.
 

JSTyler

Well-Known Member
Welcome @Mozie You've found a wonderful place to fellowship. And please take the following simply as the viewpoint a single person and not as admonishment or correction, just thinking out loud.

That said, here's where I get into a tar pit maybe...

I try and stay as far away from "super hero" movies as possible. That's been a stand my entire life, and it holds for comics, too. Admittedly I have "slipped" and watched a few with friends or when I was bored beyond all sense. I've regretted the slip every time.

Before I state why, let me reiterate to make it clear, this is just my take and not meant to cast aspersions on anyone who can watch/read them and take something positive away from them. So, enjoy your movies and ignore my rumblings.

Okay, why? I firmly believe that ALL super heroes to one degree or another are a copycat and or replacement for God, Jesus Christ and The Holy Spirit. The entire mythology of heroes from ancient times has been focused on "gods among us". There's even a game with that in the title. I hate that the super hero frenzy takes focus off real-world solutions like the need for a true Savior and places them on human-like aberrations that equate to "you can become a god or god-like".

I fear that the rise in popularity of super hero "everything" is simply man trying to fill the God shaped vacuum with something, though it falls extremely short, similar but ultimately insufficient. It's as dangerous as the Harry Potter stuff.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
Has anyone else made a connection between what Hollywood is show casing and what we read in the book of revelations? It's like so many things it can't be coincidental....

I didn't make the connections when I saw the movie, but when I watch a movie I'm only half watching it and am in a mostly brain dead state. It's evening and it's just a way to wind down before I go to bed. As entertainment, I thought End Game was pretty poor.
 

Dave

Well-Known Member
I think "the snap" in End Game is just helping plant seeds in people so when the Rapture happens then some people will see it through Thanos' point of view that it was a way to bring balance to the World to save everyone from over population and bring the world into peace and harmony. That it may have been the Antichrist's doing and he only took out the bad people to help save the world. Just my take. I feel its conditioning people for the delusion.
 

ChildofLight

Well-Known Member
I never cared for super hero shows or movies. It just aggravates me that adults dress up in costumes and go to these comic con events etc. I could never see my father do such a thing. Of course my parents were born in the early 1910s. It just feels so not Christian since parents/adults should set standards for children by example. It seems like a lot of adults act like children and dress like children.
I probably didn’t word it very well.
 

ChildofLight

Well-Known Member
I didn’t mean to side track thread, but there does seem to be somethings in movies and television regarding whats coming. They are very loosely pulling things from biblical prophecies. They are only doing to make money and create confusion. I was at a cartoon movie probably 15 years ago and through the whole thing I saw political ties regarding conservative and liberal. I don’t know if it was intended or I’m just being more aware of such things and seeing in everything.
 

Salluz

Aspiring Man of God
I fear that the rise in popularity of super hero "everything" is simply man trying to fill the God shaped vacuum with something, though it falls extremely short, similar but ultimately insufficient. It's as dangerous as the Harry Potter stuff

I know we'll still be friends if we disagree, which is why I'm comfortable speaking my peace on this one. Just getting that out of the way before I start. No hard feelings

I actually don't think Harry Potter is dangerous. Or any sort of fantasy magic for that matter, as long as one can differentiate between fantasy and reality.

I've read all of the Harry Potter books, and it was even when I was young and impressionable. I've never had even a single smidge of desire to touch a ouija board or consult spirits while on psychodelic drugs or engage in astrology. I never actually even made a connection between the two. The magic in Harry Potter doesn't really relate to the horrendous sorcery that is depicted in the Bible, as far as I can remember. It's more like a "what if some of mankind had the ability to produce their own small miracles" some people would use it for good things, some people would use it for evil things. Just like a strong person can use their strength to help people or hurt people.

Knowing how to differentiate fantasy and the imagination from reality, I never had any desire to engage in actual witchcraft because the books showed people with special abilities and called it witchcraft.

Magic in the Tolkien universe is actually divided into two categories, magic and witchcraft, where only the bad guys use witchcraft, and wizards like Gandalf are analogous to angels in the Bible.

As for superheroes and not magic, again I think we just need to be able to differentiate between fantasy and reality. I grew up really liking superman and hercules because they were both really strong. I also liked Samson a lot, because he was also really strong. I knew superman and hercules weren't real, and I knew that Samson was, because I was taught to know the difference between fantasy and reality.

But Samson was totally a superhero with his superhuman strength and taking down Israel's enemies, and he wasn't invented to take God's place. And when we get our glorified bodies, won't we practically be superheroes compared to how we live now? It's kinda fun to think about.

Although knowing that Samson was real, I did pray for God to give me superpowers too as a kid :lol that prayer hasn't been answered quite yet.

But in terms of the stories we tell and consume, I believe the most important aspect are the themes and the moral lessons the stories contain. There are plenty of shows and books that are corrupting in the morals they instill without any fantastic element, and those are ones I think people should look out for. And each person is also affected differently. I'd never advise someone to consume anything they aren't comfortable with, whether that's a food, a drink, a book, a show, whatever.

If you don't think you should watch superhero movies, I agree with you that you shouldn't. I shouldn't buy big bags of chips because I'll eat the whole thing in one sitting, but some people can buy it and only eat a little. I should hold my own behavior to a different standard because I know more or less what I can't consume responsibly. We all have different weak spots.

A work like Lord of the Rings is rife with fantasy and magic, but it has themes like showing mercy, good always eventually triumphing over evil, humble people being used for great things, love of power/money corrupting, etc.

50 Shades of Grey has zero magic, but I wouldn't touch the book with a 10 foot pole on account of it being actual pornography and all.

And I haven't even mentioned Narnia as a series.

And also, I've noticed that many Christians that hate Harry Potter or fantasy in general give Shakespeare a pass and consider his works great, but he has magic (the tempest, a midsummer night's dream), necromancy/sorcery/witchcraft (Hamlet, Macbeth), and extremely vulgar sex jokes (basically every play).

I'd say the entertainment situation calls for a bit of nuance.
 

JSTyler

Well-Known Member
I know we'll still be friends if we disagree, which is why I'm comfortable speaking my peace on this one. Just getting that out of the way before I start. No hard feelings
Absolutely. Love you brother :hug

I can quote line and verse from Potter. I can give you details about the characters outside of the books, from the vast world of the Potter-verse. I read/listened to the first book out of simple curiosity and "christian" research. I was all ready to pounce and condemn. I took it all in, hook-line-sinker, book by book. The narrator of the audio books, Jim Dale was/is an amazing artist. He brought life and depth into the characters that Rowling could've only dreamed of.

Research the history of how Rowling came about to writing the books. Most of the process is mundane but it seems that parts were "inspired" from "somewhere else", even to the point of auto-writing. Where did that inspiration come from?

That said, we'll be happy to diverge on our opinions peacefully. I still hold firmly to the base ideology that they're a distraction, a replacement for reality, and worst yet, similar in nature to a gateway drug only in written form.

My gateway into far too much of the wrong "stuff" was The Hobbit. That was the first book I ever read for pleasure. I've read a lot of the history of Tolkien and of course Lewis. I believe that their efforts were "noble" and done with much careful consideration. I still love most of what they penned. After them however, there was very little besides secular fantasy. I do recall a series, Tower of Geburah, which was from a christian perspective but not much else. I filled myself with the rest of what was "out there", books, movies, audio books, plays, far too much.

I wish it were possible to un-read, un-see, and un-know most of it. There's no long term benefit, just mental stumbling blocks, ugly, violent images I can't erase from memory.

Two great quotes from Adrian Rogers state where I'm coming from better than I can, “What’s down in the well comes up in the bucket.” And, “When someone is jostled, then you see what they’re full of. If they’re full of Jesus, then that is what will overflow. If they are full of negativity, then that will overflow, as well.” My well was by my own intention and volition filled with a lot of bad stuff. And I have to shamefully confess that I did so while being a Believer.

So, speaking for me only, about my relationship to all of the above only, I have to stick hard to Romans 6 with emphasis on verses 19-23. It's not about justification but about the progressive nature of sanctification.

And to be clear, I'd be thrilled to continue with this discussion. No anger, no reproach but learning together. If not to change hearts or minds, to grow in our friendship...I mean, we only have all of eternity to do it, so we best get moving.

:bighug
 

Salluz

Aspiring Man of God
Absolutely. Love you brother :hug

I can quote line and verse from Potter. I can give you details about the characters outside of the books, from the vast world of the Potter-verse. I read/listened to the first book out of simple curiosity and "christian" research. I was all ready to pounce and condemn. I took it all in, hook-line-sinker, book by book. The narrator of the audio books, Jim Dale was/is an amazing artist. He brought life and depth into the characters that Rowling could've only dreamed of.

Research the history of how Rowling came about to writing the books. Most of the process is mundane but it seems that parts were "inspired" from "somewhere else", even to the point of auto-writing. Where did that inspiration come from?

That said, we'll be happy to diverge on our opinions peacefully. I still hold firmly to the base ideology that they're a distraction, a replacement for reality, and worst yet, similar in nature to a gateway drug only in written form.

My gateway into far too much of the wrong "stuff" was The Hobbit. That was the first book I ever read for pleasure. I've read a lot of the history of Tolkien and of course Lewis. I believe that their efforts were "noble" and done with much careful consideration. I still love most of what they penned. After them however, there was very little besides secular fantasy. I do recall a series, Tower of Geburah, which was from a christian perspective but not much else. I filled myself with the rest of what was "out there", books, movies, audio books, plays, far too much.

I wish it were possible to un-read, un-see, and un-know most of it. There's no long term benefit, just mental stumbling blocks, ugly, violent images I can't erase from memory.

Two great quotes from Adrian Rogers state where I'm coming from better than I can, “What’s down in the well comes up in the bucket.” And, “When someone is jostled, then you see what they’re full of. If they’re full of Jesus, then that is what will overflow. If they are full of negativity, then that will overflow, as well.” My well was by my own intention and volition filled with a lot of bad stuff. And I have to shamefully confess that I did so while being a Believer.

So, speaking for me only, about my relationship to all of the above only, I have to stick hard to Romans 6 with emphasis on verses 19-23. It's not about justification but about the progressive nature of sanctification.

And to be clear, I'd be thrilled to continue with this discussion. No anger, no reproach but learning together. If not to change hearts or minds, to grow in our friendship...I mean, we only have all of eternity to do it, so we best get moving.

:bighug


:hug I've been busy running around today, but I was thinking about how to respond as I was driving. I had some really great thoughts! Sadly, I forgot them by the time I got home. lol.

Talking about auto-writing, is it possible she's just having a hard time describing "flow"? It's basically when you get so immersed in what you're doing that you don't really think about it, you just do it, and you have a distorted sense of time. It's happened to me writing essays, and I certainly wasn't channeling spirits or anything untoward.

Good news! I'm starting to remember some of my thoughts from earlier now. One of them is about entertainment in total: I've gone through several periods where I decided entertainment was a distraction, and I was just going to fill my entire day with Bible reading, sermons, forum posts, etc. I felt good about it, but I also got very very burnt out after a couple weeks of it, and everything nose dove. My current thoughts tend toward this advice from Ecclesiastes 7

15 In this meaningless life of mine I have seen both of these:

the righteous perishing in their righteousness,
and the wicked living long in their wickedness.
16 Do not be overrighteous,
neither be overwise—
why destroy yourself?
17 Do not be overwicked,
and do not be a fool—
why die before your time?
18 It is good to grasp the one
and not let go of the other.
Whoever fears God will avoid all extremes.

Having no fun probably brought me into the realm of attempting to be "overrighteous." I often fall into the trap of thinking something has to be sinful because it's enjoyable, but logically I know that has to be a trap. That's one I'm working through, even just enjoying anything, not necessarily entertainment, and even if it's completely innocent. I start to feel bad for enjoying something. My thoughts are a little disjointed here, bear with me. Thankfully this isn't an essay.

Since we were talking about reading more than anything, and especially how non-Christian writers can be dangerous, I started thinking about that as well. I absolutely agree that I wish there was some way to just forget about certain works I had no business consuming, but there are some that I'm conflicted on. Biblically speaking, I was reminded of Daniel and his three friends as I was thinking about this one.

Daniel 1:
17 To these four young men God gave knowledge and understanding of all kinds of literature and learning. And Daniel could understand visions and dreams of all kinds.

18 At the end of the time set by the king to bring them into his service, the chief official presented them to Nebuchadnezzar. 19 The king talked with them, and he found none equal to Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah; so they entered the king’s service. 20 In every matter of wisdom and understanding about which the king questioned them, he found them ten times better than all the magicians and enchanters in his whole kingdom.

What's really interesting to me is that God gave them specifically an understanding of literature. I'm taking that to be a separate classification from scripture, or else it probably would have just said scripture. That means that even their undertakings reading secular works were blessed by God and used for His purposes, and we can see in the proceeding verses that the four of them ingratiated themselves with Nebuchadnezzar with their knowledge and wisdom. They could go toe-to-toe with the secular philosophers and then some, since they were "ten times better." Given that all of the questions were asked by Nebuchadnezzar, I doubt they were questions about scripture. And their secular knowledge, which was blessed by God, is what lead to them being close to the king and later in a position to demonstrate God's providence in the furnace event.

Their knowledge of all kinds of literature wasn't something that God tolerated, but something that He actually gave them as a blessing to be used for His purposes. That's interesting to me.

I'm also reminded of Exodus 31 where God blesses a craftsman in secular pursuits for His purposes:

Now the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, 2 “See, I have called by name Bezalel, the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah. 3 And I have filled him with the Spirit of God in wisdom, in understanding, in knowledge, and in all kinds of [a]craftsmanship, 4 to create [b]artistic designs for work in gold, in silver, and in [c]bronze, 5 and in the cutting of stones [d]for settings, and in the carving of wood, so that he may work in all kinds of [e]craftsmanship. 6 And behold, I Myself have [f]appointed with him Oholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan; and in the hearts of all who are [g]skillful I have put [h]skill, so that they may make everything that I have commanded you:

It's just that in the Exodus, Bezalel is blessed by the Holy Spirit in his understanding and artistry in metalworking, masonry, and wood carving instead of literature.

Similarly, David was brought to Saul because of his musicianship and his physical prowess rather than his scriptural knowledge or character, although he had already been anointed at that point.

I wonder at how God uses secular aspects of our lives to open up doors now to sharing the gospel. Maybe someone is a huge fan of a certain hobby that is shared with a believer, and that is how they meet and what gives the opportunity for the believer to share the gospel, things like that. I don't see a basis in scripture for totally shutting ourselves off from the secular, seeing as though God Himself blesses certain secular pursuits.

I guess the question then becomes what God would bless and what He wouldn't. I can't imagine that every single bit of literature He gave them knowledge of was full to the brim with Biblical themes, seeing as though it was the stuff that was being read by magicians, astrologers, sorcerers, w/e that the king had surrounding him.
 

cavalier973

Well-Known Member
Once, I was discussing something similar to this thread with my father-in-law, and he quote Titus 1:15. Maybe that's out of context, but it stuck with me.

I would add another possibly out of context passage: Romans 14:19-23. It is talking about eating certain foods, but perhaps there is a general principle there. "Don't do anything, however innocuous, that violates your conscience or your faith."
 

cavalier973

Well-Known Member
There was once a forum I frequented, called "Fans for Christ", where people interested in "nerdy stuff" would post and comment. They closed it, but Ibdont remember why--probably it cost too much for the site owners to keep it going.

In any case, one of the members was Gary Gygax--one of the pair of fellows who developed "the Dungeons and Dragons game". He had been a Jehovah's Witness, but I think left the JWs after studying the Bible. I dont know his position with the Lord Jesus, but I definitely hope he had been truly saved.

Interestingly, he said his family lore claimed they were descended from Goliath of Gath, the fellow that God used David to slay.

Regarding Harry Potter, I avoided the books, because the renowned editor Harold Bloom said they were poorly written, cliche-riddled dreck.

I rented the first movie, and it,got,to the part where they celebrated Christmas, and I was like, "Oh! They're Christian wizards!" I was joking, of course. There are subtle Christian themes in the books, though, about grace and forgiveness, the importance of family, the effectiveness of love, and the danger of power, in its various forms. The tombstones of Harry's parents has 1 Corinthians 15:26 engraved on them.

In am not recommending the books, understand, but simpky giving,my impressions of them. From what I could see, Harry and his schoolmates do not practice occult magic, but are themselves magical beings that attend the academy to learn to harness and properly use their gifts. Sort of like Luke Skywalker and the Jedi. Which reminds me, do a search for "Seagulls", by Yoda, if you haven't seen it.

There are some genres I cannot handle. Horror, specifically. I mentioned "Jurassic Park", which I think would be categorized as "action-adventure", but I had nightmares for years of being chased by velociraptors (actually, they're Utahraptors, but, whatever). I definitely dont go to straight up horror movies, or read Stephen King novels.

I listen to a lot of true crime podcasts, but maybe I shouldn't, because it makes me fearful, which means I am not trusting God. I devour politics (or used to), and some conspiracy-theory stuff, but they can be as much a distraction as sports or movies or the like. What I am saying is that, if fantasy and/or sci-fi causes someone to stumble, I encourage that person avoid it, like I avoid horror and like I ought to avoid true crime and undue focus on politics. There are enticing elements to any genre of fiction, and it's no good claiming, "well, I am strong enough to handle it". None of us are truly strong enough to handle stuff. Enjoy wjat God allows, but pray that He will grace you with desire for Him first of all, and that He will give you wisdom to know what is acceptable for you, and what is not. Then, you can enjoy your interests, because, as my father-in-law mentioned, "to the pure, all things are pure."
 

JSTyler

Well-Known Member
:hug I've been busy running around today, but I was thinking about how to respond as I was driving. I had some really great thoughts! Sadly, I forgot them by the time I got home. lol.

Talking about auto-writing, is it possible she's just having a hard time describing "flow"? It's basically when you get so immersed in what you're doing that you don't really think about it, you just do it, and you have a distorted sense of time. It's happened to me writing essays, and I certainly wasn't channeling spirits or anything untoward.

Good news! I'm starting to remember some of my thoughts from earlier now. One of them is about entertainment in total: I've gone through several periods where I decided entertainment was a distraction, and I was just going to fill my entire day with Bible reading, sermons, forum posts, etc. I felt good about it, but I also got very very burnt out after a couple weeks of it, and everything nose dove. My current thoughts tend toward this advice from Ecclesiastes 7

15 In this meaningless life of mine I have seen both of these:

the righteous perishing in their righteousness,
and the wicked living long in their wickedness.
16 Do not be overrighteous,
neither be overwise—
why destroy yourself?
17 Do not be overwicked,
and do not be a fool—
why die before your time?
18 It is good to grasp the one
and not let go of the other.
Whoever fears God will avoid all extremes.

Having no fun probably brought me into the realm of attempting to be "overrighteous." I often fall into the trap of thinking something has to be sinful because it's enjoyable, but logically I know that has to be a trap. That's one I'm working through, even just enjoying anything, not necessarily entertainment, and even if it's completely innocent. I start to feel bad for enjoying something. My thoughts are a little disjointed here, bear with me. Thankfully this isn't an essay.

Since we were talking about reading more than anything, and especially how non-Christian writers can be dangerous, I started thinking about that as well. I absolutely agree that I wish there was some way to just forget about certain works I had no business consuming, but there are some that I'm conflicted on. Biblically speaking, I was reminded of Daniel and his three friends as I was thinking about this one.

Daniel 1:
17 To these four young men God gave knowledge and understanding of all kinds of literature and learning. And Daniel could understand visions and dreams of all kinds.

18 At the end of the time set by the king to bring them into his service, the chief official presented them to Nebuchadnezzar. 19 The king talked with them, and he found none equal to Daniel, Hananiah, Mishael and Azariah; so they entered the king’s service. 20 In every matter of wisdom and understanding about which the king questioned them, he found them ten times better than all the magicians and enchanters in his whole kingdom.

What's really interesting to me is that God gave them specifically an understanding of literature. I'm taking that to be a separate classification from scripture, or else it probably would have just said scripture. That means that even their undertakings reading secular works were blessed by God and used for His purposes, and we can see in the proceeding verses that the four of them ingratiated themselves with Nebuchadnezzar with their knowledge and wisdom. They could go toe-to-toe with the secular philosophers and then some, since they were "ten times better." Given that all of the questions were asked by Nebuchadnezzar, I doubt they were questions about scripture. And their secular knowledge, which was blessed by God, is what lead to them being close to the king and later in a position to demonstrate God's providence in the furnace event.

Their knowledge of all kinds of literature wasn't something that God tolerated, but something that He actually gave them as a blessing to be used for His purposes. That's interesting to me.

I'm also reminded of Exodus 31 where God blesses a craftsman in secular pursuits for His purposes:

Now the Lord spoke to Moses, saying, 2 “See, I have called by name Bezalel, the son of Uri, the son of Hur, of the tribe of Judah. 3 And I have filled him with the Spirit of God in wisdom, in understanding, in knowledge, and in all kinds of [a]craftsmanship, 4 to create [b]artistic designs for work in gold, in silver, and in [c]bronze, 5 and in the cutting of stones [d]for settings, and in the carving of wood, so that he may work in all kinds of [e]craftsmanship. 6 And behold, I Myself have [f]appointed with him Oholiab, the son of Ahisamach, of the tribe of Dan; and in the hearts of all who are [g]skillful I have put [h]skill, so that they may make everything that I have commanded you:

It's just that in the Exodus, Bezalel is blessed by the Holy Spirit in his understanding and artistry in metalworking, masonry, and wood carving instead of literature.

Similarly, David was brought to Saul because of his musicianship and his physical prowess rather than his scriptural knowledge or character, although he had already been anointed at that point.

I wonder at how God uses secular aspects of our lives to open up doors now to sharing the gospel. Maybe someone is a huge fan of a certain hobby that is shared with a believer, and that is how they meet and what gives the opportunity for the believer to share the gospel, things like that. I don't see a basis in scripture for totally shutting ourselves off from the secular, seeing as though God Himself blesses certain secular pursuits.

I guess the question then becomes what God would bless and what He wouldn't. I can't imagine that every single bit of literature He gave them knowledge of was full to the brim with Biblical themes, seeing as though it was the stuff that was being read by magicians, astrologers, sorcerers, w/e that the king had surrounding him.
Hey brother,

I delayed my response to make sure I could season my response with as much grace as I am capable.

1 - I have no issues at all with how you've expressed where you're coming from.

Now, the sticky point...

2 - For me, what I take from scriptures as you've included in your post is this; They inform me not of what I can do or get away with, but rather, what I no longer have to do or should try to get away with. This is not advice from me to you, this is how I function. I don't in any way condemn your process. Think, "I like vanilla, he likes chocolate", not "He's sinning, I'm not."

I see it as a freeing process, not a "freedom to" process and the more I'm inclined to bend that way, the more I find God in His abundant blessings, improves my life with more beneficial pursuits. Examples; More scripture and Bible teaching has replaced most secular sources of information, education and or entertainment. Games have been replaced with music creation of a sorts. Gaming is amusement (interesting definition there) for the sake of amusement, the other offers a form of amusement that also becomes an opportunity to try and glorify God with what I'm able to produce.

Hope that makes sense. Sorry for the delay. Like you, I prefer to mull and then snipe rather the react and carpet bomb.
 
Top