Married couples as co-pastors

glc11

Well-Known Member
This is becoming extremely common right now!

There are several churches in the new town I recently moved to. The two largest happen to both have husband and wife “co-pastors”. These are pretty big churches with multiple campuses too.

A group of ladies invited me to a women’s revival evening this past Friday night. (Hosted at one of these churches)

The guest speaker (flown in from Nashville) also happens to be a “co-pastor” of a church that she and her husband planted.

Maybe it’s just my experience, but I feel this is rapidly becoming more common.
 

Bethlehem57

Well-Known Member
This is becoming extremely common right now!

There are several churches in the new town I recently moved to. The two largest happen to both have husband and wife “co-pastors”. These are pretty big churches with multiple campuses too.

A group of ladies invited me to a women’s revival evening this past Friday night. (Hosted at one of these churches)

The guest speaker (flown in from Nashville) also happens to be a “co-pastor” of a church that she and her husband planted.

Maybe it’s just my experience, but I feel this is rapidly becoming more common.
No church is supposed to have a woman with authority over men. The Bible tells us this. This is just another example of a lukewarm church.
 

Epieikes

Well-Known Member
This is becoming extremely common right now!

There are several churches in the new town I recently moved to. The two largest happen to both have husband and wife “co-pastors”. These are pretty big churches with multiple campuses too.

A group of ladies invited me to a women’s revival evening this past Friday night. (Hosted at one of these churches)

The guest speaker (flown in from Nashville) also happens to be a “co-pastor” of a church that she and her husband planted.

Maybe it’s just my experience, but I feel this is rapidly becoming more common.
When you said flown in from Nashville, my radar went off. Please, please be careful with NAR connections. Some of the megas in our area...that's exactly why. Just looking out for ya!
 

Epieikes

Well-Known Member
Women may not be called as pastors, but they are definitely called to labor along with their husbands who are pastors... as is clear from the way Paul wrote and referred to them.
I'd say we're there personally...careful to do our best to "stay in our lanes" and complement each other, spiritual gift and God-given strengthwise. I am grateful for his covering...according to His guidelines! Thank you, Pastor Adrian!
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
I’m seeing this more and more. It’s rebellion plain and simple. Some are pretty sneaky about it too. I was looking at a church website just last week because I found out an author I was interested in goes there. Under “Leadership” it said “Meet the lead Pastors who set the vision of Elevation Church.” You’d think they had more than one pastor. Click the link and you get a pic of “Pastor Steven and Holly Furtick.” I even see it locally in my very conservative area.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Not only are women not ordinarily supposed to be Pastors, but also single men are not ordinarily supposed to be Pastors.
Most denominations that adhere to the first, do not adhere to the second.

The word in 1 Timothy 3 is "should," and dire/exigent circumstances do sometimes occur. In at least one islamic country, there are underground churches, which are almost all women, is an example of where women Pastors have been indispensable/the only way to avoid detection/assure women's safety/cultural issues
 
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cheeky200386

Well-Known Member
Not only are women not ordinarily supposed to be Pastors, but also single men are not ordinarily supposed to be Pastors.
Most denominations that adhere to the first, do not adhere to the second.

The word in 1 Timothy 3 is "should," and dire/exigent circumstances do sometimes occur. In at least one islamic country, there are underground churches, which are almost all women, is an example of where women Pastors have been indispensable/the only way to avoid detection/assure women's safety/cultural issues
I don't agree with violating God's standards. God can build a man to be a pastor in an area should he want to. It's always wrong to take matters into our own hands because of a perceived lack.
 

Lastcall

Well-Known Member
Not only are women not ordinarily supposed to be Pastors, but also single men are not ordinarily supposed to be Pastors.
Most denominations that adhere to the first, do not adhere to the second.

The word in 1 Timothy 3 is "should," and dire/exigent circumstances do sometimes occur. In at least one islamic country, there are underground churches, which are almost all women, is an example of where women Pastors have been indispensable/the only way to avoid detection/assure women's safety/cultural issues
I dont see where scripture says a pastor has to be married, but it does talk about a married pastor, and taking care of his family.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
I dont see where scripture says a pastor has to be married, but it does talk about a married pastor, and taking care of his family.

It's the same verses that exclude women as Pastors.

1 This is a true saying, if a man desire the office of a bishop, he desireth a good work.
2 A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach;
3 Not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but patient, not a brawler, not covetous;
4 One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity;
5 (For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?)
6 Not a novice, lest being lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil.
7 Moreover he must have a good report of them which are without; lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil.
8 Likewise must the deacons be grave, not doubletongued, not given to much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre;
9 Holding the mystery of the faith in a pure conscience.
10 And let these also first be proved; then let them use the office of a deacon, being found blameless.
11 Even so must their wives be grave, not slanderers, sober, faithful in all things.
12 Let the deacons be the husbands of one wife, ruling their children and their own houses well.
13 For they that have used the office of a deacon well purchase to themselves a good degree, and great boldness in the faith which is in Christ Jesus.
1 Timothy 3:1-13, KJV


One of the other translations has "should" instead of "must." I don't remember which one it was that I saw it in, but it's not ESV, RSV, or NASB. The NIV is a little more ambiguous, but I don't trust it, anyway.


Gotquestions shows three different interpretations of 1 Timothy 3:2, but doesn't mention the issue of a single man (other than divorced)

"There are at least three possible interpretations of the phrase husband of one wife in 1 Timothy 3:2 (ESV). 1) It could simply be saying that a polygamist is not qualified to be an elder, a deacon or a pastor. This is the most literal interpretation of the English rendering of the phrase, but seems somewhat unlikely considering that polygamy was quite rare in the time that Paul was writing. 2) The Greek could literally be translated as “one-woman man.” In other words, a bishop must be absolutely loyal to the woman he is married to. This interpretation acknowledges that the original text focuses not on marital status but on moral purity. 3) The phrase could also be understood to declare that, in order to be an elder/deacon/pastor, a man can only have been married once, other than in the case of a remarried widower; in other words, a pastor cannot be a divorcé."

More
https://www.gotquestions.org/husband-one-wife.html
 
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Lastcall

Well-Known Member
It's the same verses that exclude women as Pastors.

1 This is a true saying, if a man desire the office of a bishop, he desireth a good work.
2 A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach;
3 Not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but patient, not a brawler, not covetous;
4 One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity;
5 (For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?)
6 Not a novice, lest being lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil.
7 Moreover he must have a good report of them which are without; lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil.
8 Likewise must the deacons be grave, not doubletongued, not given to much wine, not greedy of filthy lucre;
9 Holding the mystery of the faith in a pure conscience.
10 And let these also first be proved; then let them use the office of a deacon, being found blameless.
11 Even so must their wives be grave, not slanderers, sober, faithful in all things.
12 Let the deacons be the husbands of one wife, ruling their children and their own houses well.
13 For they that have used the office of a deacon well purchase to themselves a good degree, and great boldness in the faith which is in Christ Jesus.
1 Timothy 3:1-13, KJV


One of the other translations has "should" instead of "must." I don't remember which one it was that I saw it in, but it's not ESV, RSV, or NASB. The NIV is a little more ambiguous, but I don't trust it, anyway.


Gotquestions shows three different interpretations of 1 Timothy 3:2, but doesn't mention the issue of a single man (other than divorced)

"There are at least three possible interpretations of the phrase husband of one wife in 1 Timothy 3:2 (ESV). 1) It could simply be saying that a polygamist is not qualified to be an elder, a deacon or a pastor. This is the most literal interpretation of the English rendering of the phrase, but seems somewhat unlikely considering that polygamy was quite rare in the time that Paul was writing. 2) The Greek could literally be translated as “one-woman man.” In other words, a bishop must be absolutely loyal to the woman he is married to. This interpretation acknowledges that the original text focuses not on marital status but on moral purity. 3) The phrase could also be understood to declare that, in order to be an elder/deacon/pastor, a man can only have been married once, other than in the case of a remarried widower; in other words, a pastor cannot be a divorcé."

More
https://www.gotquestions.org/husband-one-wife.html
Still dont see the restriction
 

GotGrace

Well-Known Member
This is becoming extremely common right now!

There are several churches in the new town I recently moved to. The two largest happen to both have husband and wife “co-pastors”. These are pretty big churches with multiple campuses too.

A group of ladies invited me to a women’s revival evening this past Friday night. (Hosted at one of these churches)

The guest speaker (flown in from Nashville) also happens to be a “co-pastor” of a church that she and her husband planted.

Maybe it’s just my experience, but I feel this is rapidly becoming more common.
This is becoming extremely common right now!

There are several churches in the new town I recently moved to. The two largest happen to both have husband and wife “co-pastors”. These are pretty big churches with multiple campuses too.

A group of ladies invited me to a women’s revival evening this past Friday night. (Hosted at one of these churches)

The guest speaker (flown in from Nashville) also happens to be a “co-pastor” of a church that she and her husband planted.

Maybe it’s just my experience, but I feel this is rapidly becoming more common.
1 Timothy talks about the qualifications of an overseer referring to a male only. I don’t interpret it any other way than the office belonging to a male only. I’ve only been S. Baptist and it would seem off to me to sit under a female preaching. I actually think I would be uncomfortable.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
1 Timothy talks about the qualifications of an overseer referring to a male only. I don’t interpret it any other way than the office belonging to a male only. I’ve only been S. Baptist and it would seem off to me to sit under a female preaching. I actually think I would be uncomfortable.

I went to one service (not my denomination) in which a woman Pastor led the service and preached (surprise! I didn't know until service started). It was awful :apostasy :puke Lukewarm and full of bad doctrine and apostasy :apostasy :puke The whole thing just didn't seem right in so many ways, including just having a woman in the pulpit, leading the liturgy, leading the responsive prayers and Psalms, etc. :apostasy :puke I don't even like women/girls/boys reading the Scripture lessons anymore (and I've done it), although I'm not sure if that's more personal preference than right or wrong, or maybe it's because my hearing is bad and the women, girls, and boys all MUMBLE and/or don't have the mic adjusted correctly and/or don't know how to projeect voice using church accoustics. Acolytes, fine. Music Minister, Organist, Choir and Orchestra, fine. Altar Guild, Ushers, Janitors, Sextons, Parking Attendants, Nursery, Sunday School Teacher (before Confirmation age), women's Bible Study, Vacation Bible School, Nurse or Counselor for women/girls, Prayer Circles, etc., etc., etc. fine.

Fortunately, my denomination (LCMS) doesn't ordain women, so I don't have to worry about a woman Pastor or Elder, even if I walk into a church that I've never been to before [whew!]
 
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