Lake of Fire

lowlyservant

New Member
Here in scripture is the lake of fire mentioned:

NKJV Revelation 20:13-14. The sea gave up the dead who were in it, and Death and Hades delivered up the dead who were in them. And they were judged, each one according to his works. Then Death and Hades were cast into the lake of fire. This is the second death.

NKJV Revelation 21:8. But the cowardly, unbelieving, abominable, murderers, sexually immoral, sorcerers, idolaters, and all liars shall have their part in the lake which burns with fire and brimstone, which is the second death."

* images are not allowed on the forums *

When molten magma comes to the earth's surface, it turns into lava, which dries. Molten magma beneath the earth's surface continues to burn. This is the only lake of fire on earth!
 
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SkyRider

Well-Known Member
I wanted to ask about the phrase, speaking of the Lake of Fire, “where the worm dieth not” and what it meant. To me, I think that it could suggest that no matter how awful this place is and no matter how hot and how horrible the suffering will be, that even something as fragile as a mere worm would not perish but would forever be in this state of dying - the second death. We can't even conceive of being in such a state and yet it goes on and on. Horrible.

This is what GotQuestions.org says about it:

Jerusalem’s ancient garbage dump—a place called Gehenna—was illustrative of the ceaseless agonies of hell. This dump was on the south side of Jerusalem. In Old Testament times, children had been sacrificed to idols there (2 Kings 23:10); in Jesus’ day, it was a place burning with constant fires to consume the waste that was thrown there. The material burned there included everything from household trash to animal carcasses to convicted criminals (Jeremiah 7:31–33). Needless to say, the Jews considered Gehenna a cursed place of impurity and uncleanness.

The word translated “hell” in Mark 9:43 is the Greek word Gehenna, which comes from the Hebrew name for a place called the “Valley of Hinnom.” Jesus uses this place to paint a vivid image of what hell is like. The Jewish people often associated the Valley of Hinnom with spiritual death.

In Mark 9:48, when Jesus says, “Where their worm does not die and the fire is not quenched” (ESV), He is quoting from Isaiah 66:24: “They will go out and look on the dead bodies of those who rebelled against me; the worms that eat them will not die, the fire that burns them will not be quenched, and they will be loathsome to all mankind.” In both texts the word translated as “worm” literally means “grub” or “maggot.” A maggot would have an obvious association with a dump like Gehenna where dead bodies are thrown; however, the maggot Christ speaks of “will not die.”

Taken at face value, this text is one of the most horrific descriptions of what hell is like. The thought of eternal torment, likened to maggots eating away at a rotting corpse, is undoubtedly ghastly. Hell is so awful that Christ said, figuratively speaking, it’s better to cut off the hand that causes you to sin than to end up in hell (Matthew 5:30).

Mark 9:48 does not mean that there are literal worms in hell or that there are worms that live forever; rather, Jesus is teaching the fact of unending suffering in hell—the “worm” never stops causing torment. Notice that the worm is personal. Both Isaiah 66:24 and Mark 9:48 use the word their to identify the worm’s owner. The sources of torment are attached each to its own host.

Some Bible scholars believe the “worm” refers to a man’s conscience. Those in hell, being completely cut off from God, exist with a nagging, guilty conscience that, like a persistent worm, gnaws away at its victim with a remorse that can never be mitigated. No matter what the word worm refers to, the most important thing to be gained from these words of Christ is that we should do everything in our power to escape the horrors of hell, and there is only one thing to that end—receiving Jesus as the Lord of our lives (John 3:16).
 

ChildofLight

Well-Known Member
One of my friends mentioned that maybe all the earthquakes and volcanic eruptions are increasing the size of the earths core to accommodate more residents. The path to hell must have increased in width as well in this day and age.
 

Wally

Choose Your Words Carefully...
The Lake of Fire is a spiritual destination. All Flesh will be destroyed and burned up, or translated to eternal vessels suitable to inhabit Heaven or hell.
The Lake is a place apart from God, a destination for all corruption and unbelievers as well as spiritual angels who rebelled, the foremost of which is satan.

We may find some earthly physical representation, but it is only a picture. The real place is something none of us want to see.

Praise God Christ saves completely!
 

katt

Well-Known Member
Hell is constantly growing, it was only created for the fallen angels, now there are a pylethra of Satan's followers the place has to hold, so, yes, it is constantly growing.
 

iwouldbewithyouificould

Well-Known Member
I think He uses the term "Lake of Fire" to give us humans a physical image we can relate to regarding the torment of eternal damnation. It can be absolutely literal, but how would you in a single sentence describe a place that can inflict pain to both humans (beings with both physical and spiritual components) and fallen angels (beings with a spiritual component only)? It must be a specially designed place far away from our physical universe, located in another dimension, with currently unknown physical and spiritual properties engineered to function with its future inhabitants in mind. Of course, God can also reformat the bodies of those future residents with sensitivities commensurate with their intended punishment. I'm just glad that those of us who know Christ will never know this by experience.
 

Dragontiger777

Well-Known Member
Throw into Second Death "That mean they will not live therefore death mean gone perish?" Unless I am wrong about an as they let live but torment of eternal damnation?

As my question there is no way for them to escape from the Lake of Fire? Similar to stay there forever without escape?

I need to be clear persception!
 

Bethlehem57

Well-Known Member
I wanted to ask about the phrase, speaking of the Lake of Fire, “where the worm dieth not” and what it meant. To me, I think that it could suggest that no matter how awful this place is and no matter how hot and how horrible the suffering will be, that even something as fragile as a mere worm would not perish but would forever be in this state of dying - the second death. We can't even conceive of being in such a state and yet it goes on and on. Horrible.

This is what GotQuestions.org says about it:

Jerusalem’s ancient garbage dump—a place called Gehenna—was illustrative of the ceaseless agonies of hell. This dump was on the south side of Jerusalem. In Old Testament times, children had been sacrificed to idols there (2 Kings 23:10); in Jesus’ day, it was a place burning with constant fires to consume the waste that was thrown there. The material burned there included everything from household trash to animal carcasses to convicted criminals (Jeremiah 7:31–33). Needless to say, the Jews considered Gehenna a cursed place of impurity and uncleanness.

The word translated “hell” in Mark 9:43 is the Greek word Gehenna, which comes from the Hebrew name for a place called the “Valley of Hinnom.” Jesus uses this place to paint a vivid image of what hell is like. The Jewish people often associated the Valley of Hinnom with spiritual death.

In Mark 9:48, when Jesus says, “Where their worm does not die and the fire is not quenched” (ESV), He is quoting from Isaiah 66:24: “They will go out and look on the dead bodies of those who rebelled against me; the worms that eat them will not die, the fire that burns them will not be quenched, and they will be loathsome to all mankind.” In both texts the word translated as “worm” literally means “grub” or “maggot.” A maggot would have an obvious association with a dump like Gehenna where dead bodies are thrown; however, the maggot Christ speaks of “will not die.”

Taken at face value, this text is one of the most horrific descriptions of what hell is like. The thought of eternal torment, likened to maggots eating away at a rotting corpse, is undoubtedly ghastly. Hell is so awful that Christ said, figuratively speaking, it’s better to cut off the hand that causes you to sin than to end up in hell (Matthew 5:30).

Mark 9:48 does not mean that there are literal worms in hell or that there are worms that live forever; rather, Jesus is teaching the fact of unending suffering in hell—the “worm” never stops causing torment. Notice that the worm is personal. Both Isaiah 66:24 and Mark 9:48 use the word their to identify the worm’s owner. The sources of torment are attached each to its own host.

Some Bible scholars believe the “worm” refers to a man’s conscience. Those in hell, being completely cut off from God, exist with a nagging, guilty conscience that, like a persistent worm, gnaws away at its victim with a remorse that can never be mitigated. No matter what the word worm refers to, the most important thing to be gained from these words of Christ is that we should do everything in our power to escape the horrors of hell, and there is only one thing to that end—receiving Jesus as the Lord of our lives (John 3:16).
Their worm - This figure is taken from Isaiah 66:24 and in Mark 9:48 in the New Testament, “where their worm does not die and the fire is not quenched." The verse in Mark 9 this verse is within a larger picture of the horrors of hell, which utilizes a place called Gehenna—the garbage dump of ancient Jerusalem. Gehenna was located on the south end of Jerusalem and was a site for pagan child sacrifices during the times of the kings (2 Kings 23:10).

During Jesus' lifetime, Gehenna had a constant fire burning to get rid of the trash that was left there—from regular trash to the bodies of dead animals and convicted criminals (Jeremiah 7:31-33). The Jews considered Gehenna to be a place of filth.

This does not refer to a literal worm that never dies, but rather, it is a figurative description of a person's individual "worm" that never stops causing suffering and torment in hell. Notice that in this verse as well as Isaiah 66:24, "their" precedes the word "worm," indicating that there are individually assigned worms for each "host." The alternate version to the eternal bodies of the saints who receive a perfect body that doesn’t age, die, get sick etc.
 

Wally

Choose Your Words Carefully...
I suspect that whatever we dare to imagine about the Lake, its is nothing to the actual horror of the place.

That people willingly go there, testifies to the depravity of men and our desperate need for a Savior.


And can it be that I should gain
An interest in the Savior's blood
Died He for me, who caused His pain
For me, who Him to death pursued?
Amazing love! How can it be
That Thou, my God, should die for me? .....Sovereign Grace Music, Bob Kauflin
 

Bethlehem57

Well-Known Member
Agreed. I was reading something..can’t remember what..but the gist was that Satan, in his infinitely cruel, although intelligent thinking can imagine the worst thing possible for those who are saved and refuse the free gift of salvation, through Jesus Christ alone, and end up in eternal punishment. The article, was only guessing at how cruel this could be for unbelievers and in no way am I saying that this is true, however, imagine your worst, most scary thought of death. Something that terrifies the heck out of you…I’ll tell you, for me, that’s being eaten by a shark. Can you imagine that happening over and over again, for eternity? Thank You Lord, that I don’t have to think ab this because of Your mercy! Thank You Lord!

I remember when I wasn’t a believer. Thank You Lord, for You saved a wretch like me and although I don’t deserve it, I know that when I die, I’ll see You face to face! What a glorious day that will be! You sent Your Son for me and whoever else will simply believe in Jesus’ finished work on the cross, and then, through the gift of the indwelling Holy Spirit, a true change of heart. Living accordingly is the fruit that we produce; nothing we can do of ourselves, only through Jesus, can we continue to grow in the knowledge of Him! Amazing love!
 

Wally

Choose Your Words Carefully...
Perhaps the power of hell is in its irony.

The rich man had all his wants satisfied in life. In death, those wants continue on ... unfulfilled.

We can easily create a carnal list of wants: hunger, pleasure, physical comfort....

but add to that list; Compassion, Fellowship, Spiritual Rest, Peace of mind... these things reside with God.

The Lake of fire is a place without God. Now imagine all these an more gnawing at a soul for eternity... where Their worm dieth not...

However you interpret it, it is a destination to avoid at all costs.

And the Incredible Grace and Mercy of Christ is He already paid the cost and offers us more than we can imagine.

It simply takes child-like faith and trusting Him to complete what He said He's done, is doing, and will do.
 

katt

Well-Known Member
Speaking of the lake of fire, I've always wondered, where did the myth that Satan controls hell and the people in it come from?
 

Len

Well-Known Member
Speaking of the lake of fire, I've always wondered, where did the myth that Satan controls hell and the people in it come from?
Hi Katt, that was a good question and gotquestions had an answer, in part it says:
Where does the idea that Satan is the master of hell come from, if not from the Bible? Much of the false thinking may come from Dante Alighiere’s The Divine Comedy and John Milton’s Paradise Lost. Many other works of art, and literary pieces such as Dan Brown’s novel Inferno, follow Dante’s lead and picture Satan as the one in charge of hell.

Dante’s poem describes the brutal descent of sinners into the underworld. Dante journeys through different levels of hell and purgatory and eventually arrives in paradise. The poem itself was an amalgamation of myths, Catholic ideas (like purgatory), and Islamic traditions about Muhammad’s “night of ascension” (lailat al-miraj). Dante’s medieval view of hell is influenced more by the Qur’an than the Bible.

Dante’s literary vision of hell is depicted by Botticelli in his painting Map of Hell as a subterranean funnel of suffering—a wretched underground landscape of fire, brimstone, sewage, and monsters, with Satan himself waiting at its core. It’s all very disturbing, and effective as a work of art, but it is based on the imaginations of men, not the Word of God.
 

ZAGS

Member
Speaking of the lake of fire, I've always wondered, where did the myth that Satan controls hell and the people in it come from?
It could be that Satan is the leader of the fallen angels.
Revelation 12 9 So the great dragon was cast out, that serpent of old, called the Devil and Satan, who deceives the whole world; he was cast to the earth, and his angels were cast out with him.
Satan leads the rebellion against God so he is the 'leader' of all the fallen angels, so maybe that's why people think he will be in control of hell.
 

Dragontiger777

Well-Known Member
Speaking of the lake of fire, I've always wondered, where did the myth that Satan controls hell and the people in it come from?
Can I add to that.......

Will this Lake of Fire protection itself from anyone escape? I trust in God full 100 percent. Same time I want to learn and curious. Why God allow the satan roaming free in the Universe???
 

Wally

Choose Your Words Carefully...
satan is the ruler of this world/age. he is a powerful spiritual being so one might reason his rule emanates from hell.
Scripture tells us many things, but most often what we know is mixed with what we imagine.

I suspect more comes to us through fables like Milton's: "better to rule in hell, than serve in heaven" than what is actually said in the Bible.


And then we wonder Why has God even allowed this being to exist, let alone roam around to influence and destroy?

We do not know all that is in the mind of God. Nor is He required to explain.

Job never got his answer, although through Scripture we have a audience view of what took place in Heaven.

I would dare one opinion:

God created man to fellowship with. That is a very special relationship. One that includes experiences shared in every aspect of life.
We have such a relationship available in Christ - who experienced life as we do - yet without sin.

We have a relationship unlike angels, we have sonship and inheritance, something vastly deeper.

We do not know many of the Why's?

But we clearly know what was done to redeem us from sin.

Perhaps the greatest expression of our love to God is not asking Why, but praising Him for what He did and trusting He knows exactly what He is doing..
 
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