Jesus Was Indignant

Kenny64

Well-Known Member
40 A man with leprosy came to him and begged him on his knees, “If you are willing, you can make me clean.” 41 Jesus was indignant. He reached out his hand and touched the man. “I am willing,” he said. “Be clean!” 42 Immediately the leprosy left him and he was cleansed. Mark 1:40,41, 42NIV

Mark 1:10,41,42KJV

Man, there is so much anger out there, out there in the world, more so in America last week. There is a lot of anger out there in the media, social and otherwise. There is a lot of anger in our work places, in our homes and even in our houses of worship. Should this be? If we are called to love all people, to see all people as children of God, should we not replace our anger with love? The above scripture reminds us that Jesus was often angry, angry at the scribes and Pharisees, angry with his disciples, Jesus at times was out of control angry as he flipped tables in the temple like he was on Housewives of Atlanta. So, the question remains is anger a sin? We can see through Jesus’ actions that anger is not always a sin because Christ was without sin, Jesus was also fully human, the perfected human, perfected in love, perfected in grace, perfected in righteousness and yet Jesus got angry at times. Maybe we should look at anger in another way, not always as a flaw in humanity, but perhaps as a part of becoming more human, as fully human as Jesus. But how do we know the difference between anger as a vice and anger as a virtue? Anger becomes a vice, becomes a sin when our anger and actions are aimed towards something other than what God intends. If we get angry because our spouse burns the potatoes, then we need to remind ourselves that God tells us to love and care for each other always. So, repentance of the angry spouse is in order, and maybe some diamonds wouldn’t hurt either. But let’s look at what gets Jesus angry; injustice, oppression, poverty, suffering, alienation, abuse, and apathy.

In the scripture above who is Jesus angry with? The leper? To find out as Paul Harvey says; “The rest of the story”, you need to read the next couple verses, Jesus sent the leper to the priests after he had healed him, it was the priests who had refused to treat him previously because he had no money, he was ostracized from community, ostracized from family, ostracized from earning a wage, and the priests were adding and abetting is ostracization. Jesus’ indignation was aimed at the priests who refused to do what God had intended them to do.

As more fuel gets added to these issues over the coming weeks let us not shy away from proclaiming what God has intended. That all of God’s creation be in the state of love and care for each other. Let us make sure that our anger is aimed correctly, on things out of step with what God has intended. But let us also be in prayer, prayer for our nation, prayer for the healing that needs to come between the races, pray for God to raise up a great unifier, and prayer for those who espouse hate as a virtue, they are as in desperate need of God’s love as we are.

So here NIV describes 'indignation'
and KJV describes 'compassion'!
Question which rightly divides the truth? 2 Timothy 2:15
 
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Simon

Well-Known Member
I've just checked this out Kenny.

Most versions translate this verse as moved or filled with compassion or pity.

"Indignant" is a minority variant reading found only in a few very recent translations. [NIV 2011 - not the original, CEB 2011, LEB 2012] Even then, these few translations all indicate "compassion" as an alternative in the footnotes.

The greek word σπλαγχνισθεις (compassion) has been changed to οργισθεις, meaning to be angry or furious.

Apparently this is a minority variant which appears in "Codex Bezae", (c. 375-499 AD).

Personally I would put the use of this variant down to dark forces seeking to twist the truth. Hope that helps. :)
 
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Kenny64

Well-Known Member
In the scripture above who is Jesus angry with? The leper? To find out as Paul Harvey says; “The rest of the story”, you need to read the next couple verses, Jesus sent the leper to the priests after he had healed him, it was the priests who had refused to treat him previously because he had no money, he was ostracized from community, ostracized from family, ostracized from earning a wage, and the priests were adding and abetting is ostracization. Jesus’ indignation was aimed at the priests who refused to do what God had intended them to do.
I'm curious on the meaning Jesus was trying to portray here in scripture.
Mark 1:43KJV Mark 1:43NIV

And he straitly charged him, and forthwith sent him away;
NIV
Jesus sent him away at once with a strong warning:

I have a KJV teaching Bible in which the notes say Jesus for some reason was angry or irritated, as does the vivid "sent him away".!
"Jesus was indignant at the outrage of mankind's sickness and suffering, affronts to a loving God's power to redeem His creation from all that is tainted by the imperfect and ultimately evil."
 
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Simon

Well-Known Member
Here's my take on it.

I'm curious on the meaning Jesus was trying to portray here in scripture.
Mark 1:43-45
43 He sternly warned him, and sent him away at once, 44 saying, “See that you say nothing to anyone. But go your way, show yourself to the priest, and offer for your cleansing what Moses commanded, as a testimony to them.” 45 Instead he went out and began to proclaim it widely and to spread the news around, so that Jesus could no more openly enter the city, but was out in remote places. And they came to Him from every quarter.

Having had compassion on him and healed him he [straitly, strictly, sternly or assertively] [charged, warned, admonished or commanded] him ...

That sounds to me just like the description of a teacher instructing a pupil to get on with their work, or a hospital doctor warning the patient how to manage their condition or to take more exercise for their own good. I don't see any anger there. We also have to see it in the context of the whole Bible, Jesus doesn't get indignant with people that he has just healed.

There was a good reason for Jesus to give him stern instructions. In fact 3 of them:
1. Don't tell anyone else. We see the consequences of his disobedience in verse 45 - Jesus could no more openly enter the city, but was out in remote places. And they came to Him from every quarter. That must have been a real nuisance.
2. To do what was commanded by the Law. He had to go and show himself the priest and follow instructions. It was quite complicated. Leviticus 14:1-20
3. As a testimony to them. The priest had to inspect the man and pronounce him cured so there was evidence that it was a real healing.

For me the most interesting point is that he disobeyed and then went and blabbed to everyone. He went from leper to motormouth!
:bouncies

Obviously Jesus must have known that would happen, but he healed him anyway.
 
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Kenny64

Well-Known Member
I think Jesus was looking for the spiritual healing and change of heart. That didn't happen according to the context.
 
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