Is Matthew 18:22 a math problem?

cavalier973

Well-Known Member
“I tell you, not as many as seven,” Jesus replied, “but seventy times seven."

Most translations say "seventy times seven"; the Nearly Inspired Version and the Ever Suspect Version say "seventy-seven times".

I copied the phrase from the Reina-Valera Spanish Bible into Google Translate, and it said "seventy times seven".

I copied the Greek word used, "ἑβδομηκοντάκις", and put it into Google Translate, amd it said "seventy-nine".

I copied the phrase, "ἑβδομηκοντάκις ἑπτά" into Google Translate, and it said "seven seventh".

The purpose of my question is to check on a claim by Chuck Missler, who based his claim on the phrase meaning "seventy times seven", or four hundred and ninety.
 

cavalier973

Well-Known Member
The way I have heard it explained is that Peter thought he was being magnanimous by saying seven times, because the rabbis said three times is the limit, but Jesus countered with a much larger number, with the understanding that you forgive innumerable times.

Either "seventy-seven times" or "seventy times seven [i.e. four hundred and ninety times]" works for that purpose.

However if it is the latter translation, we have an interesting inference we can draw, that *may* relate to prophesy. Four hundred and ninety years was specifically the amount of time God accused Israel of neglecting to keep His sabbath for the land, and determined the time they would be in exile. If Jesus was saying "seventy times seven [490]", then He was possibly reminding Peter of how many times God forgave Israel before executing judgement.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
The way I have heard it explained is that Peter thought he was being magnanimous by saying seven times, because the rabbis said three times is the limit, but Jesus countered with a much larger number, with the understanding that you forgive innumerable times.

Either "seventy-seven times" or "seventy times seven [i.e. four hundred and ninety times]" works for that purpose.

However if it is the latter translation, we have an interesting inference we can draw, that *may* relate to prophesy. Four hundred and ninety years was specifically the amount of time God accused Israel of neglecting to keep His sabbath for the land, and determined the time they would be in exile. If Jesus was saying "seventy times seven [490]", then He was possibly reminding Peter of how many times God forgave Israel before executing judgement.
That is a terrific insight!!!!!
 

lenraff

Well-Known Member
The way I have heard it explained is that Peter thought he was being magnanimous by saying seven times, because the rabbis said three times is the limit, but Jesus countered with a much larger number, with the understanding that you forgive innumerable times.

Either "seventy-seven times" or "seventy times seven [i.e. four hundred and ninety times]" works for that purpose.

However if it is the latter translation, we have an interesting inference we can draw, that *may* relate to prophesy. Four hundred and ninety years was specifically the amount of time God accused Israel of neglecting to keep His sabbath for the land, and determined the time they would be in exile. If Jesus was saying "seventy times seven [490]", then He was possibly reminding Peter of how many times God forgave Israel before executing judgement.
And reminding that the God of the old covenant was owed 490 years of letting HIS land rest and He held them to the letter. Which drove home the difference between Grace and Law.
 

cavalier973

Well-Known Member
That is a terrific insight!!!!!
I am sure I got it from Chuck Missler. The guy was an amazing teacher, used of God, even though I vehemently disagree with some of what he said.

Thread derail incoming:

I've told this story before, but I listen to different podcasts as I work, and one that I tried is called "Hardcore History" with Dan Carlin. He did one on Julius Caesar's conquest of Gaul, and it was pretty good, so,I tried his episode on Darius "King of Kings". He begins by reading from the Book of Daniel about the fall of Babylon, says it is his favorite story from the Bible, but that none of it is true.

I became so annoyed, I turned it off, and started looking for someone who knew that the Book of Daniel *was* true, and found this guy, Missler. I was quickly hooked.
 
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