in need of a new bible....

iwilltrustintheLord

Well-Known Member
Only KJV. i'm due for just a straight red letter edition. been reading a JSM signature edition exposatory study bible and i'm done with it. I want to hear from the Lord God for myself. the KJV store has what they call the notetakers study bible. no references just wide nearly 3" margins, for writing notes. I'm also looking at the wide margin center column red letter. i'm use to that format and there still would be some room for note taking.

i don't like how they use Beth Moore, on the back of the box as some endorsement by a freak and a fraud. God help us discern. has anyone bought a kjv from the kjv store? my local christian bookstore said they have no red letter edition bibles. i was shocked to hear that. God help us. a so called christian bookstore without a kjv red letter version? let that sink in. unbelievable
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
a so called christian bookstore without a kjv red letter version? let that sink in. unbelievable
I avoid all “Christian” bookstores. The last few I visited years ago had a bigger collection of false teachings than they did of the true gospel.

I have a few KJV bibles, but I never use them as my daily study bible. I prefer NKJV, easier to read the plain english language.
 

ShilohRose

Well-Known Member
Only KJV. i'm due for just a straight red letter edition. been reading a JSM signature edition exposatory study bible and i'm done with it. I want to hear from the Lord God for myself. the KJV store has what they call the notetakers study bible. no references just wide nearly 3" margins, for writing notes. I'm also looking at the wide margin center column red letter. i'm use to that format and there still would be some room for note taking.

i don't like how they use Beth Moore, on the back of the box as some endorsement by a freak and a fraud. God help us discern. has anyone bought a kjv from the kjv store? my local christian bookstore said they have no red letter edition bibles. i was shocked to hear that. God help us. a so called christian bookstore without a kjv red letter version? let that sink in. unbelievable
I purchased a Scofield study Bible for my father from the KJV Store, and it was exactly the same as the one he had always used.
 

iwilltrustintheLord

Well-Known Member
well tonight i looked over more bibles at kjv store and i think i found what i wanted. the cameo, cambridge KJV in calfskin. i wish they would make more bibles in brown. most are in black. but ill take it and it's less money. center column. red letter.

90 bucks 2 ribbons. my jimmy swaggart giant print front and back is literally tearing apart at the seams. can't wait to order my new bible at months end.
 

annieforjesus

Well-Known Member
I love the KJV and the NKJV also, and I need to ask for some input about giving a NLT to a friend who has always found the KJV hard to read...I do read the NLT sometimes because it is a much easier read and I don't notice that it changes meanings.. she's older, as I am and my intention in giving her the translation is so that she can begin to enjoy God's Word and to help he correct wrong teachings from the past...for instance, she was taught that the Bema Seat is a judgement for Believers. I don't want to make a mistake, so I appreciate your input.
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
KJV is a great bible. NASB is also a great bible. I have both and they are both Scofields. I can't imagine ever needing another Bible with these two in my library. Don't get me wrong, there are other interesting Bibles out there (I've been tempted in the past to buy other bibles like a KJV that is in rearranged in historically chronological order or a KJV which was essentially a historical Atlas combined with the full KJV, etc.), but really, either a KJV or a NASB is all you need, and if you want one with notes/commentary, I can't think of a better one than a Scofield. Don't get me wrong, Scofield wasn't God, so his notes are not inspired, but I find most of them very helpful.

The final thing is this: The NASB can't match the majesty of prose in the KJV. It doesn't even try. The KJV can't match the NASB in terms of technical accuracy (note I said "technical.") Being forced to choose one, I would probably go with the KJV but would miss my NASB.
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
The one Bible I really wish existed would by a Scofield KJV or NASB that has a modern format. By this, I mean that I would love one of those two Bibles where the text is NOT in columns, but, rather goes from left to right using the FULL width of the page, and then continues on the next line that also is fully left to right on the whole page.

Basically, what I am describing is a Bible that is formatted just like any other book you own.

Now, with that said, I am a firm believer in not tearing down a fence until finding why it was erected in the first place. But this presents a good question!

Does anyone here know why almost all bibles are formatted to a page with two columns? Wouldn't it be easier for the modern man (and woman) to read the Bible if it were printed like any other book?

Other than print news papers, I don't know of any other publisher that uses columns as the norm.

I am extremely interested in all of your thoughts but even more interested in anyone here who can tell why modern bibles still use columns.

Thanks!
 

Blue Sky

Well-Known Member
The one Bible I really wish existed would by a Scofield KJV or NASB that has a modern format. By this, I mean that I would love one of those two Bibles where the text is NOT in columns, but, rather goes from left to right using the FULL width of the page, and then continues on the next line that also is fully left to right on the whole page.

Basically, what I am describing is a Bible that is formatted just like any other book you own.

Now, with that said, I am a firm believer in not tearing down a fence until finding why it was erected in the first place. But this presents a good question!

Does anyone here know why almost all bibles are formatted to a page with two columns? Wouldn't it be easier for the modern man (and woman) to read the Bible if it were printed like any other book?

Other than print news papers, I don't know of any other publisher that uses columns as the norm.

I am extremely interested in all of your thoughts but even more interested in anyone here who can tell why modern bibles still use columns.

Thanks!
Google's your friend. Top response said that the traditional two-column approach to printing the Bible exists for a few reasons:

1) Reference books often follow this format. Encyclopedias, dictionaries, concordances, all frequently use this approach.
2) the Bible is a big book and, so, to help keep its size manageable, a smaller font is often used (smaller than 10 pt. font). While this helps cut down on the overall size of the printing, the smaller font also makes it more difficult for a person's eyes to read. Breaking up the lines into smaller sections by using columns helps to counteract this.

As for a new Bible, if you have some extra cash on hand, I whole-heartedly recommend one of Schulyer's Bibles. You can get a red-letter, a non-red-letter, a wide-margin, a personal-size, etc. They also have several options for colors and the quality is really good. You can find them over on evangelical bible.com (not a sponsor). One of these days, I'm going to scrounge together the cash to get a Canterbury edition. :)
 

iwilltrustintheLord

Well-Known Member
The one Bible I really wish existed would by a Scofield KJV or NASB that has a modern format. By this, I mean that I would love one of those two Bibles where the text is NOT in columns, but, rather goes from left to right using the FULL width of the page, and then continues on the next line that also is fully left to right on the whole page.

Basically, what I am describing is a Bible that is formatted just like any other book you own.

Now, with that said, I am a firm believer in not tearing down a fence until finding why it was erected in the first place. But this presents a good question!

Does anyone here know why almost all bibles are formatted to a page with two columns? Wouldn't it be easier for the modern man (and woman) to read the Bible if it were printed like any other book?

Other than print news papers, I don't know of any other publisher that uses columns as the norm.

I am extremely interested in all of your thoughts but even more interested in anyone here who can tell why modern bibles still use columns.

Thanks!
most have like the center column reference verses and notations, which i personally like. it's easier on the eyes if a bible read like a book so u need not move your eyes back n forth so much but God's word brings health the the whole body! lol...it says it somewhere i think! the note takers bible actually looks kind of weird with it's columns so peeps can write their notes. im gonna go with the cambridge or cameo wide margin red letter center column. will be ordering it next month
 

Matthew6:33

Withstand in the evil day. Eph 6:13
I love the KJV and the NKJV also, and I need to ask for some input about giving a NLT to a friend who has always found the KJV hard to read...I do read the NLT sometimes because it is a much easier read and I don't notice that it changes meanings.. she's older, as I am and my intention in giving her the translation is so that she can begin to enjoy God's Word and to help he correct wrong teachings from the past...for instance, she was taught that the Bema Seat is a judgement for Believers. I don't want to make a mistake, so I appreciate your input.
The NLT is an excellent choice for new believers. It is the version I started off with and I still love it for its casual reading, easy to understand, and solid translation quality.

On a separate note, the biggest difference between the KJV and the NASB translation is the text criticism that each translation adheres to.

The KJV for example, is critical to the point that it is translated based on the 'most existing copies with this translation.' So since there are more manuscripts found with a specific translation, you will find that translation in the KJV.

In contrast, the NASB adheres to an 'earliest is best' textual criticism. The difference in translation is because it adheres to the translation carried by the earliest known manuscripts that have been discovered. So even though these manuscripts may be the minority as far as how many exist, they take precedent because they existed first. In theory, the earlier the manuscripts, the more accurate the translation should be.

I am by far an expert when it comes to this stuff, but I do know that you can get a PHD in the study of it.
 
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annieforjesus

Well-Known Member
Thank you so much, Matthew6:33, ..I needed some input because this friend is saved but never really had solid Bible teaching...when she opened up and said she had trouble reading the KJV, , I wanted to help her be able to read for herself, to clear up errors she may have been taught, rather than me trying to do it...I've about quit asking questions here because they are usually ignored..and that has not been a welcoming feeling for me...so thank you for your input.
 

pixelpusher

Well-Known Member
The one Bible I really wish existed would by a Scofield KJV or NASB that has a modern format. By this, I mean that I would love one of those two Bibles where the text is NOT in columns, but, rather goes from left to right using the FULL width of the page, and then continues on the next line that also is fully left to right on the whole page.

Basically, what I am describing is a Bible that is formatted just like any other book you own.

Now, with that said, I am a firm believer in not tearing down a fence until finding why it was erected in the first place. But this presents a good question!

Does anyone here know why almost all bibles are formatted to a page with two columns? Wouldn't it be easier for the modern man (and woman) to read the Bible if it were printed like any other book?

Other than print news papers, I don't know of any other publisher that uses columns as the norm.

I am extremely interested in all of your thoughts but even more interested in anyone here who can tell why modern bibles still use columns.

Thanks!
Like Blue Sky said, shorter lines are easier to read, it is easier for the eye to pick up the next line. I seem to recall 6-8 words per line as a rule of thumb from typography class.
 

cavalier973

Well-Known Member
Check out the Blue Letter Bible

There is an app for it. It is extremely useful; you can quickly search for terms (for when you remember part of a verse, but not it’s reference). You can quickly lookup cross references. You can do “word studies” (like, every time the word “love” is mentioned). It has the “Interlinear” option, which allows you, with a click, to see the verse in the original Hebrew or Greek, followed by an explanation for each word in the verse. It comes in KJV, but you can download numerous other translations. There is an option to view commentaries by various Bible teachers, including Chuck Smith an J. Vernon Magee.
 

Chris

Administrator
Staff member
I have a Grant R. Jeffrey KJV Prophecy Bible that I like a lot. I think Tim LaHaye has a NKJV Prophecy Bible as well. I haven't looked at that one but it is probably good, too. Grant's website appears to be offline. :-(
 
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