If you could play one piece of music what would it be???

Anewcreationinjesus

Well-Known Member
For the RF musical gang and all who want to play something, and hopefully we'll all get to play post rapture and in the eternal state....

I can't help but wish as a piano player by ear who picks at sight reading music very poorly.... That I could play Milhaud's Scaramouche piano duet (as part of the duet or a solo version if that exists!) For any piano folks on here, do you know the piece I mean and has anyone played it?

For everyone, is there a particular piece you really really wish you could play?? (on any instrument!)
 
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anath

I Love the Lord
Well this isn't difficult, I love all of Chopin's 21 Nocturnes and if I could I'd play right NOW it would be E Nocturne in B-flat minor
My fav of all time is Nocturne in E-flat major. I had a simplified piece I played when I was 10 in a recital. That's when I became Chopin convert

I almost forgot, on a Concert Steinway Grand
 
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Anewcreationinjesus

Well-Known Member
Well this isn't difficult, I love all of Chopin's 21 Nocturnes and if I could I'd play right NOW it would be E Nocturne in B-flat minor
My fav of all time is Nocturne in E-flat major. I had a simplified piece I played when I was 10 in a recital. That's when I became Chopin convert

I almost forgot, on a Concert Steinway Grand
For me it would be the Chopin Scherzo I think in B flat minor out of his pieces....Steinway Grand, lovely!! Once upon a time I took part in an amateur composing competition and played on one of those.... And messed up my piece within the first 30 seconds out of nerves!!!!
 
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ShilohRose

Well-Known Member
Well this isn't difficult, I love all of Chopin's 21 Nocturnes and if I could I'd play right NOW it would be E Nocturne in B-flat minor
My fav of all time is Nocturne in E-flat major. I had a simplified piece I played when I was 10 in a recital. That's when I became Chopin convert

I almost forgot, on a Concert Steinway Grand
I had to go and listen to both of these.

I have a fondness for Christian Sinding's "Rustle of Spring" and Franz Liszt's Un Sospiro Concert Etude No 3. However, there is so much beautiful music I would love to play. I have a huge stack of "to be learned" music. These two are particularly frustrating for me because my fingers are short. I have lots of power in my hands and arms, but my hands are small and my fingers are short. Rats. Someday, though, it won't matter! I'll be able to play them then. l can hardly wait!

I love to improvise hymns, too!

And I definitely agree with your choice of piano.

I've never been very good at narrowing down choices to one thing . . .
 

greg64

Well-Known Member
My middle son is musical and plays primarily piano (he pices classical) but also bassoon and is starting on electric bass.

Me, I want to learn guitar, but haven't gotten far. One song I'd love to play is Roundabout by Yes. I can do about the first dozen or so notes, so I guess that's a start...
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
For the RF musical gang and all who want to play something, and hopefully we'll all get to play post rapture and in the eternal state....

I can't help but wish as a piano player by ear who picks at sight reading music very poorly.... That I could play Milhaud's Scaramouche piano duet (as part of the duet or a solo version if that exists!) For any piano folks on here, do you know the piece I mean and has anyone played it?

For everyone, is there a particular piece you really really wish you could play?? (on any instrument!)
Ravel's "Bolero" And.... well, "Little Drummer Boy." (Which I think it the most awesome sentiment to our Salvation).
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
Seriously... there is a reason to attend the orchestra, if you haven't witnessed a full orchestra playing Bolero, you are kind of missing out of the the gifts that God gives people. Unfortunately, we aren't allowed to post you tube videos (house rules, I get it), but I'll cheat and show you something awesome. Go on You Tube and query this: danish orchestra good bad ugly. And marvel.
 
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Anewcreationinjesus

Well-Known Member
Seriously... there is a reason to attend the orchestra, if you haven't witnessed a full orchestra playing Bolero, you kind of missing out of the the gifts that God gives people. Unfortunately, we aren't allowed to post you tube videos (house rules, I get it), but I'll cheat and show you something awesome. Go on You Tube and query this: danish orchestra good bad ugly. And marvel.
Well orchestration was always something I longed to do ... Not this side of heaven :) always used to go mad for the Candide overture by Leonard Bernstein at one end of the spectrum and the likes of Mendlesohn Hebrides overture at the other :).... I wonder which of the composers we'll see in Heaven??
 
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Jonathan

Well-Known Member
Well orchestration was always something I longed to do.... Not this side of heaven :) always used to go mad for the Candide overture by Leonard Bernstein at one end of the spectrum and the likes of Mendlesohn Hebrides overture at the other :). I wonder which of the composers we'll see in Heaven??
I can barely write a tune. God's given we a weird fit. I can totally love and appreciate all sorts of complexities as far as music goes, but I am completely incapable of producing it myself. LB was a master by the way. You already know that. Anyways, I hope you (and anyone else reading this) takes my advice and searches on YouTube for "Danish Orchestra Good Bad, and Ugly."

To see real artists perform, in real time, the music we take for granted, is really spell bounding.
 

Anewcreationinjesus

Well-Known Member
I can barely write a tune. God's given we a weird fit. I can totally love and appreciate all sorts of complexities as far as music goes, but I am completely incapable of producing it myself. LB was a master by the way. You already know that. Anyways, I hope you (and anyone else reading this) takes my advice and searches on YouTube for "Danish Orchestra Good Bad, and Ugly."

To see real artists perform, in real time, the music we take for granted, is really spell bounding.
Ahh Morricone :) Just watched that now, the main theme from 3.50 onwards is so well written... I used to be an absolute opera and classical music junkie, brought up on the stuff! Spent many hours listening to broadcasts from the Metropolitan Opera and classical radio programs :) my dd is interested in keyboard so am passing on bad habits to her lol as not formally trained...another I'd love to play would be Rhapsody in Blue, Gershwin :) Beethoven Waldstein Sonata, Debussy clair de lune, Liszt Hungarian Rhapsody no 2...and I could go on but won't lol :)

Update - woke up with a combination of Morricone and the Milhaud piece I want to play in my head :)
 
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DMac

Well-Known Member
Seriously... there is a reason to attend the orchestra, if you haven't witnessed a full orchestra playing Bolero, you are kind of missing out of the the gifts that God gives people. Unfortunately, we aren't allowed to post you tube videos (house rules, I get it), but I'll cheat and show you something awesome. Go on You Tube and query this: danish orchestra good bad ugly. And marvel.
That was pretty cool. :cool:
I could probably play those two sticks that one guy slapped together.
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
I am hitting the sack. So this will be my last post for the night. I just want you to know that if you have any plans of joining the Danish Orchestra, you better be serious about it. If you watch the clip at exactly 2:00, you'll see how they treat people who don't practice enough.
 

mattfivefour

Administrator
Staff member
Seriously... there is a reason to attend the orchestra, if you haven't witnessed a full orchestra playing Bolero, you are kind of missing out of the the gifts that God gives people. Unfortunately, we aren't allowed to post you tube videos (house rules, I get it), but I'll cheat and show you something awesome. Go on You Tube and query this: danish orchestra good bad ugly. And marvel.
That was really cool! A lot of fun to listen to and watch. And I bet a lot of fun to play, too. Thanks for sharing that.

You mention you love Ravel's Bolero. Many, many, many years ago I played percussion on that piece (and others) with a young symphony orchestra in London, England. The drum part is a nightmare. An endless 2-bar 24 note pattern, all beats exactly even, with no accents. You start pp but at set places you increase in volume, until at the beginning of the 289th bar (if I recall correctly) you hit ff ! Because of the repetitive nature of the pattern (playing the same 24 notes over and over for about a quarter of an hour) you become hypnotized and counting the bars becomes very difficult. There are of course a number of instrumental cues during the piece, but the final one is that the piccolo stops playing 3-1/2 bars before the ff . Funny, I can remember the details but not the conductor. It was, I think, either Adrian Boult or John Barbirolli. (I played a couple of concerts in the summer of 1962 and had a different conductor for each.) But I do remember that the Bolero was terrifying.

I remember during the first rehearsal for Rossini's Thieving Magpie the conductor (one of the two mentioned above) stopped the orchestra, looked at me and asked what the h*** I was doing on the snare drum. Next rehearsal (and for the concert at Albert Hall) I found myself playing the triangle. :lol
 

Anewcreationinjesus

Well-Known Member
That was really cool! A lot of fun to listen to and watch. And I bet a lot of fun to play, too. Thanks for sharing that.

You mention you love Ravel's Bolero. Many, many, many years ago I played percussion on that piece (and others) with a young symphony orchestra in London, England. The drum part is a nightmare. An endless 2-bar 24 note pattern, all beats exactly even, with no accents. You start pp but at set places you increase in volume, until at the beginning of the 289th bar (if I recall correctly) you hit ff ! Because of the repetitive nature of the pattern (playing the same 24 notes over and over for about a quarter of an hour) you become hypnotized and counting the bars becomes very difficult. There are of course a number of instrumental cues during the piece, but the final one is that the piccolo stops playing 3-1/2 bars before the ff . Funny, I can remember the details but not the conductor. It was, I think, either Adrian Boult or John Barbirolli. (I played a couple of concerts in the summer of 1962 and had a different conductor for each.) But I do remember that the Bolero was terrifying.

I remember during the first rehearsal for Rossini's Thieving Magpie the conductor (one of the two mentioned above) stopped the orchestra, looked at me and asked what the h*** I was doing on the snare drum. Next rehearsal (and for the concert at Albert Hall) I found myself playing the triangle. :lol
That's a brilliant story Adrian :) yeah always thought the percussion part on Bolero would be tough to keep going! And gosh those conductors.... I remember once reading an anecdote re a famous opera singer and conductor where they had an argument and the singer said to the conductor that he knew his part, implying the conductor didn't know his.... Ouch!!!!
 
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