I want to formally introduce myself

ahlecce

Well-Known Member
No, I have DILV and TGV, double inlet left ventricle and transpostion of the great vessels. I'm not really sure how they did it all. All I know that is without God, I could have never have gotten through any of it.
 

Noah Cotterill

Well-Known Member
No, I have DILV and TGV, double inlet left ventricle and transpostion of the great vessels. I'm not really sure how they did it all. All I know that is without God, I could have never have gotten through any of it.
What age did they operate? I'm assuming fairly young.
 

ahlecce

Well-Known Member
Actually, no. When I was born my parents were told that I wouldn't live to be two, that there wasn't anything that could be done. I had a shunt at age 13, another OHS at 17, the fontan at 19, a bafill leak repair at 28, a pacemaker at 37, and my aorta and aortic valve replaced at 38. I'm 40 now.
 

IamPJ

Well-Known Member
Welcome to the forum Noah. It's great to have you here with us!!! I have enjoyed reading your posts. I wish you well in your studies.
 

caligal

Well-Known Member
:heythere Hi Noah, welcome to RF. My DH was a cadio/pulmonary tech and head of school while he was in the Navy. About your school loans, talk to a naval medical officer recruiter.:wave
 

Noah Cotterill

Well-Known Member
ahlecce - A miracle indeed!

PJ - Thank you!

Caligal - Thanks! I was interested in doing something with the armed forces, but I'm not allowed due to asthma.
 

Meg

Well-Known Member
Noah the thing that really counts and makes your career worth while is: is it something that you really really like to do. If you have that then it isn't work it is something that you enjoy it isn't a job, it is a way of life!

God bless you and care for you. May God fill your heart with joy. May God fill your heart with love for your patients. May God fill your life with many interesting people.
Amen and Amen.

I am a Patent Ductus survivor (I guess thats how you put it). Had pediatric open heart surgery at appx 2 yrs old. That must have been some delicate work too. Nowhere as involved as Ahlecce, but still, delicate enough. The Lord will lead you where He needs you, Noah. For my sister, the difference between 1 leg and 2 after a devastating accident was a top surgeon willing to take on a shattered bone in a 60 something woman, rather than permit a lesser MD to just cut her leg off, so this is something only you and God can decide.
 

ahlecce

Well-Known Member
Noah, as to the miracle comment, like I said in my testimony, With God All things are possible. It is in His hands. I am praying that you will be able to discern God's voice telling you what field to choose.

Meg ~ It's always nice to meet a fellow CHD'er and sister in Christ! :hug
 

Noah Cotterill

Well-Known Member
Amen and Amen.

I am a Patent Ductus survivor (I guess thats how you put it). Had pediatric open heart surgery at appx 2 yrs old. That must have been some delicate work too. Nowhere as involved as Ahlecce, but still, delicate enough. The Lord will lead you where He needs you, Noah. For my sister, the difference between 1 leg and 2 after a devastating accident was a top surgeon willing to take on a shattered bone in a 60 something woman, rather than permit a lesser MD to just cut her leg off, so this is something only you and God can decide.
That's amazing, Meg! I want to be ambitious like that as well. "Go big, or go home," as they say.
Pediatric heart surgery is very dangerous. In fact, it's a long road to become one too:

4 years undergrad. 4 years Med school. 1 year intern. 3 years general surgery residency. 3 years cardiac surgery residency. 3 years pediatric heart surgery fellowship.
 

Meg

Well-Known Member
Noah, as to the miracle comment, like I said in my testimony, With God All things are possible. It is in His hands. I am praying that you will be able to discern God's voice telling you what field to choose.

Meg ~ It's always nice to meet a fellow CHD'er and sister in Christ! :hug
:hug :hat: :wave Thanks. When I was younger, I was afraid to use any kind of speed, because I was afraid the place they sewed the hole closed might tear open... I guess that caution was good for me. Robert assures me that it won't happen though. I'm in my early 50's and thats comforting about now. Do you ever catch yourself worrying that something they did might come undone?
 

Meg

Well-Known Member
That's amazing, Meg! I want to be ambitious like that as well. "Go big, or go home," as they say.
Pediatric heart surgery is very dangerous. In fact, it's a long road to become one too:

4 years undergrad. 4 years Med school. 1 year intern. 3 years general surgery residency. 3 years cardiac surgery residency. 3 years pediatric heart surgery fellowship.
Yea, I find that very believable... "Go big or go home", huh? Thats probably at least some of the attitude my Dad feared in the mid 1980's when Mom finally got him to retire. My Dad believed the medicine was a trust, probably believed it was a trust from God (he was a Catholic). He took it very seriously, and he was treasured by everyone in the region who had heard of him. People would travel over an hour to see him... Dad did surgery, and he took that REALLY seriously. One of his colleagues left a sponge in a patient, and he ranted about that for some time over dinner. Sometimes I wonder what its like to place your hands in a living person, that is a very underrated yet tremendous responsibility. A surgeon holds the patient's life in his or her hands.

I met some Med students while doing a stint as a temp at the Ga college (MCG). I saw how hard they work, and my respect for doctors deepened a lot. Back in the Stone Age when Dad was practicing, patients used to call him at home, he'd pull "on call" duty every other weekend. He cared a lot, and he sacrificed a lot to be available for his patients. That was Old School, now they all seem to have answering services...

As a patient with serious hip problems, I can say the rest of us are completely at the mercy of the doctors. I hope you never forget that. I went to a doctor in agony after a bad fall in 2009 and got blown off. Wasted a lot of time and money last year on bad medicine, and I still don't know whats wrong. There are 2 kinds of doctors, the kind who care about the patients and the kind that don't. The rest is details. Both kind make good money and get lots of respect from people, but the kind who care are the ones who heal. The other kind do much harm... They really messed me up, not by what they did, but rather by what they didn't. I still don't know whats wrong with my hip, and I am out of resources to try to find out. It hurts in more ways than one...
 

ahlecce

Well-Known Member
Meg, I guess I never thought about that. I deal more with the dreadful what-iffy's of what can potentially happen down the road. I am human and have to remind myself constantly that this is in God's hands. Nothing is going to happen to me that He doesn't already know about.

Your dad sounds like an awesome doctor!!

I will be praying for you.

Noah,
Someone's got to be a pediatric cardiac surgeon, might as well be you! My cardiac NP just finished his doctorate, and he is 57, so keep plugging away and you will get there eventually whatever your goal and where God leads you!
 

Meg

Well-Known Member
Meg, I guess I never thought about that. I deal more with the dreadful what-iffy's of what can potentially happen down the road. I am human and have to remind myself constantly that this is in God's hands. Nothing is going to happen to me that He doesn't already know about.

Your dad sounds like an awesome doctor!!

I will be praying for you.

Noah,
Someone's got to be a pediatric cardiac surgeon, might as well be you! My cardiac NP just finished his doctorate, and he is 57, so keep plugging away and you will get there eventually whatever your goal and where God leads you!
:hug :hug :hug Dad passed in 1990, but he was an awesome Doctor and an awesome man.
 

Noah Cotterill

Well-Known Member
Yea, I find that very believable... "Go big or go home", huh? Thats probably at least some of the attitude my Dad feared in the mid 1980's when Mom finally got him to retire. My Dad believed the medicine was a trust, probably believed it was a trust from God (he was a Catholic). He took it very seriously, and he was treasured by everyone in the region who had heard of him. People would travel over an hour to see him... Dad did surgery, and he took that REALLY seriously. One of his colleagues left a sponge in a patient, and he ranted about that for some time over dinner. Sometimes I wonder what its like to place your hands in a living person, that is a very underrated yet tremendous responsibility. A surgeon holds the patient's life in his or her hands.

I met some Med students while doing a stint as a temp at the Ga college (MCG). I saw how hard they work, and my respect for doctors deepened a lot. Back in the Stone Age when Dad was practicing, patients used to call him at home, he'd pull "on call" duty every other weekend. He cared a lot, and he sacrificed a lot to be available for his patients. That was Old School, now they all seem to have answering services...

As a patient with serious hip problems, I can say the rest of us are completely at the mercy of the doctors. I hope you never forget that. I went to a doctor in agony after a bad fall in 2009 and got blown off. Wasted a lot of time and money last year on bad medicine, and I still don't know whats wrong. There are 2 kinds of doctors, the kind who care about the patients and the kind that don't. The rest is details. Both kind make good money and get lots of respect from people, but the kind who care are the ones who heal. The other kind do much harm... They really messed me up, not by what they did, but rather by what they didn't. I still don't know whats wrong with my hip, and I am out of resources to try to find out. It hurts in more ways than one...

I won't forget that. There's a gigantic trust of doctors that our nation has. HUGE! People let doctors do painful procedures on them, and put them through hell, because they believe the doctor is making the overall right choice for their health. I don't want to take advantage of that. I don't want to tell someone they need surgery (when they don't) just to make some more money. And honestly, with the amount of surgeries I'll be doing, I'd rather weed out the people who could benefit from clinical medicine.
 

Noah Cotterill

Well-Known Member
Meg, I guess I never thought about that. I deal more with the dreadful what-iffy's of what can potentially happen down the road. I am human and have to remind myself constantly that this is in God's hands. Nothing is going to happen to me that He doesn't already know about.

Your dad sounds like an awesome doctor!!

I will be praying for you.

Noah,
Someone's got to be a pediatric cardiac surgeon, might as well be you! My cardiac NP just finished his doctorate, and he is 57, so keep plugging away and you will get there eventually whatever your goal and where God leads you!
I agree. Someone has to do it. The plus side is, once you get into your 2nd year of med school, you're involved a lot in the field. Once you're in residency, you're technically a doctor and have some freedom. I told my wife that even if I had to keep applying to med school until I was 40, I would.
 

SonSeeker

Well-Known Member
I met some Med students while doing a stint as a temp at the Ga college (MCG). I saw how hard they work, and my respect for doctors deepened a lot. Back in the Stone Age when Dad was practicing, patients used to call him at home, he'd pull "on call" duty every other weekend. He cared a lot, and he sacrificed a lot to be available for his patients. That was Old School, now they all seem to have answering services...

As a patient with serious hip problems, I can say the rest of us are completely at the mercy of the doctors. I hope you never forget that. I went to a doctor in agony after a bad fall in 2009 and got blown off. Wasted a lot of time and money last year on bad medicine, and I still don't know whats wrong. There are 2 kinds of doctors, the kind who care about the patients and the kind that don't. The rest is details. Both kind make good money and get lots of respect from people, but the kind who care are the ones who heal. The other kind do much harm... They really messed me up, not by what they did, but rather by what they didn't. I still don't know whats wrong with my hip, and I am out of resources to try to find out. It hurts in more ways than one...
So sorry you still have hip problems, Meg.


Noah, as a Christian I pray you take to heart these words from Meg. In your chosen profession you will make a LOT of money whether you become a doctor who cares or one who simply wants to get paid. The ones who care are the ones we all remember and appreciate. It's amazing how many surgeries ahlecce , Meg, and I have had in our lifetimes. I only mentioned the osteoarthritis surgeries, not the three hernia operations etc. Two surgeons stand out for me, one really did make house calls to check up me and we live out in the weeds. The other gave me his personal cell phone number in case I needed immediate attention! Apparently God knew I would be beating up my body a lot so He provided me with some great medical care.:thumbup

Also, Carl's words make so much sense. As someone else put it, "Do what you love, and you'll never work a day in your life."

Most of us on RF have been around the block many more times than you have, and have experienced life with its ups and downs and strange twists and turns. We may not have the book learning you have, but we do have the experience of living. Please use our experience to your advantage. God bless you, Noah.:hug
 

Noah Cotterill

Well-Known Member
So sorry you still have hip problems, Meg.


Noah, as a Christian I pray you take to heart these words from Meg. In your chosen profession you will make a LOT of money whether you become a doctor who cares or one who simply wants to get paid. The ones who care are the ones we all remember and appreciate. It's amazing how many surgeries ahlecce , Meg, and I have had in our lifetimes. I only mentioned the osteoarthritis surgeries, not the three hernia operations etc. Two surgeons stand out for me, one really did make house calls to check up me and we live out in the weeds. The other gave me his personal cell phone number in case I needed immediate attention! Apparently God knew I would be beating up my body a lot so He provided me with some great medical care.:thumbup

Also, Carl's words make so much sense. As someone else put it, "Do what you love, and you'll never work a day in your life."

Most of us on RF have been around the block many more times than you have, and have experienced life with its ups and downs and strange twists and turns. We may not have the book learning you have, but we do have the experience of living. Please use our experience to your advantage. God bless you, Noah.:hug
I agree. Book-learning and clinical knowledge can never replace wisdom and life-experience. I've definitely been getting a lot of that though in the past few years. Since I graduated I've had medical complications, gotten married, had a baby, almost been divorced, been sued for things I never did, had school problems, etc. in 5 years. My wife and I have been so busy lately, I don't think we're never not exhausted. She left for school at 8, and won't be back until 8 pm, and we're moving tomorrow. But I'm actually really thankful. Not for the bad stuff, but because God got us through it all and made us better people. I think now at 23 I finally feel like an adult. It sounds messed up, but I'm enjoying how hard it is. I think as I go I'll learn a lot from my experiences getting toward my goal. My wife and I always ask each other if we ever saw ourselves as being where we are 4 or 5 years ago when we were fresh out of high school.

And don't worry, I'll care about patients more than money. Doing procedures would be enough fun for me!
 
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