HRT after Menopause?

ShilohRose

Well-Known Member
My dr. has recommended that I give Premarin (Ugh. I know what it is.) a six week trial run. I'm surprised that he prescribed it, considering my history. He must think, however, that it will benefit me. I'm very reluctant to take it. My track record with estrogen has been unpleasant -- depression, irritability, and weight gain. Does anyone have any experience with Premarin? I have prayed about it, but I am unclear as to what to do. The prescription has been filled, but I have yet to take any of them. I remember when I took something similar years ago, that I would start feeling the depression, irritability, and weight gain, in as little as a three or four days. I don't want to deal with any of that during Thanksgiving and Christmas.
 

ShilohRose

Well-Known Member
Thanks, HelenS. I'm 55, and I had to have a partial hysterectomy when I was 43. I still have one ovary. I'm over the hot flashes, thankfully, but some of the other aging issues I need to manage. He thinks it might help with the interstitial cystitis that I have as well. :confused I never thought about cutting them in half, and we have a pill chopper. I'm praying about it and hoping for some clear direction soon. I have to admit that I'm concerned about hair loss with Premarin, since I've already begun to have some thinning. I'm trying to figure out a B vitamin dose my bladder will tolerate without pain to help with the hair loss, but I don't know if I can take enough for it to help.
 

Ladyinwaiting

Well-Known Member
Suzanne Somers is a wealth of information on this subject. It was through one of her websites that I found a local doctor who will prescribe natural hormone replacement. Also, there is Dr. Lee and his book What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause. I would try the alternative options first.

You said you prayed about it and are unclear about what to do. I would not jump in until it becomes clear. Your doctor may think it may benefit you, but it is your body and you have to live with the consequences.
 

Hol

Worships Him
Suzanne Somers is a wealth of information on this subject. It was through one of her websites that I found a local doctor who will prescribe natural hormone replacement. Also, there is Dr. Lee and his book What Your Doctor May Not Tell You About Menopause. I would try the alternative options first.

You said you prayed about it and are unclear about what to do. I would not jump in until it becomes clear. Your doctor may think it may benefit you, but it is your body and you have to live with the consequences.
:agree
 

ShilohRose

Well-Known Member
My thyroid numbers were fine, so it's not that for my hair. I take Zyrtec, fish oil, a probiotic, and a multivitamin. I take Ustell for bladder pain when it's necessary, and that is a prescription med. The fish oil was prescribed by my general practitioner, and the Zyrtec and Ustell by a urologist. I took Elmiron for interstitial cystitis from 2004 to 2015, but I've been off it this year. Elmiron is hard on the liver, and I wanted to give it a break.
 
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Hol

Worships Him
Careful about taking supplements. They are not regulated and some brands you'd expect to be high quality are not (Google supplements pulled from the market sold under the GNC label).

That said, I take daily supplements, a selection that work for me, after much prayer & some study. Many studies are cloaked ads for supplements. If anyone has concerns about any medication try this search: from Google, type in Google Scholar. That subset is full of carefully screened peer review articles & abstracts.

But the Lord truly helped me. For years I had both a tradional doctor and a MD Naturopath (now just my traditional Doctor). Normally my gynecologist visits would be with the naturopath office's Nurse Practitioner, and one day I got shuffled to the MD to discuss my blood work, and other labs. He wanted to know what supplements I took because my labs were showing improvement, especially in my blood. (His office sold supplements, but they were too spendy so I buy a variety of brands from Amazon.)

Well, faith heals us in our minds and our bodies. Plus, after much prayer the Lord knew exactly what I needed for supplements and He knew how to guide my choices.

Prayer is the answer to healthy bodies, and how to break with all chemicals. I used to worry over paying for prescriptions, but I now can live free of chemicals because our Heavenly Father answers prayer.

If anyone needs pharmaceutical help, stick with it. If you want help stepping your body off chemicals, pray for wisdom.
 

Lynn

Well-Known Member
. . ask your doctor about supplements. Some can work at cross-purposes with any other medication you are taking and some have addicting and/or side effects you really don't want. Please be careful.
Agreed! At our annual physical exams, our doctor's nurse updates our charts to indicate which supplements we may have added since our last visit the previous year to be sure that there is no contraindications for what we're taking. There are some supplements that will either exacerbate the effect of some medications or the reverse can happen, and the supplement works against a particular Rx med. This is also true of certain foods. After recent knee replacement surgery, I was placed on a Rx blood thinner for four weeks. Upon discharge from the hospital, the hospital pharmacist came to my room to counsel me on which foods to avoid while taking the new medication. I appreciated the input, as I was not as informed as I thought regarding proper dietary restrictions while taking this particular medication.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
I used to nurse on a rehab unit where we worked with a lot of hip and knee replacements in addition to brain injury and some other conditions. I was there for a few years, and I NEVER saw a replacement required with 2 exceptions--and neither was on that ward. It was in training in 1975 and it was an older gent who had one of the very first hip replacements here in BC, and he was in because the joint was fine, but the long standing infection in his bones was rejecting the implant. The other was my dad, whose original hip replacement wasn't put in right, and the dr in the Yukon trying to solve the problem ended up rebreaking Dad's hip area where the implant was cemented in. An unfortunate but rare event.

If you have a replacement, you won't usually need another ever. They will outlast even the youngest patients. Due to torte law, which allows patients to sue drs for all kinds of things, almost all Orthopaedic surgeons will tell you it may need replacing in 5 years. That is LAWSUIT PREVENTION TALK, and in reality, those things outlast the lives of their owners all the time.

The ONLY thing is to be meticulous about avoiding infection. Remember that while the site is healing there is a fast track from the skin to the bone along the suture lines and the scar area. Once that closes over you are safe. I remember posting on a thread here a year or two back about how to stay safe in the hospital, which if anyone needs, I can dig it back up.

Basically don't let ANY dr or nurse near you till they wash their hands, and watch that they observe proper sterile protocols, gloves are not magic, so if the glove touches anything like the curtains, pulling the nurses hair back (don't ever accept long hair landing in your wound!) or the RN or Dr needs to leave briefly, make sure they glove up with FRESH gloves. Wash YOUR hands, and insist on people wearing masks when near your open wound. NO cough or sneeze can accidentally happen to contaminate that way.

And final point, take care of your oral and dental health. An infected wisdom tooth has caused more bone infections than hip implants any day of the week. Take care of tooth and gum health if you have an implant because those germs travel thru the heart to the implant more easily than from any other infection site due to the way the lymphatic system and the circulatory system work. Face and head stuff travels faster and worser. Bad English but you get the point.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
OH no Helen, so sorry!!!! That is rare. Which is why it's important NOT to generalize like I just did.

I once said to a friend who thought she was expecting twins, Oh for goodness sake Barb (I said in my best know it all tone) you are probably just big for dates, statistically speaking twins are a lot less likely. She produced twins, and had great delight in sharing the ultrasound with me. Two lovely healthy little identical twin girls.

Which reminds me of one of the teachers who taught us about the use of medical statistics and the point was your patient is NOT a statistic, while they may be less likely to do x, NEVER rule x out. And then she used to tell of a very nice patient she had on a mental ward who was being overmedicated because he kept on hearing voices. Till one day, someone realized he was hearing some staff outside his window -- I think it was a regular coffee or something. They then asked, is THAT the voices? and yes, it was. Poor man was doing better than everyone thought and his meds were promptly scaled down. She said always check it out.

I had a few patients who ran what I called reverse fevers, where they actually dropped body temp when fighting infection. I used to tell incredulous freshly minted RNs to not ignore a dropping body temp any more than a rising one. Rare but true.

Point being, people are individual and they need to be looked at and listened to thoroughly because it ain't always what you expect.
 

Cindy S.

Well-Known Member
My mother in law was on premarin for over 10 years. Her new Dr told her she's been on it way too long.
She was at least 70 when she went off it and the raging hot flashes came back.
I think if you're unlucky enough to get them you just have to go through at least that was her experience.
Not all people get them. I never did!
 

penbrat

Well-Known Member
I had a full hysterectomy at 45 and got shoved into surgical menopause overnight. I cannot take HRT because I had severe endometriosis. Weight gain and horrible hot flashes have been very hard to deal with, especially trying to sleep. I have tried Gabapentin but it did not help. I think I have tried every supplement out there and nothing helped either. What I have found works the best is if I eat healthy (no starchy carbs or sugar) and cut back on the caffeine and try to exercise or at least walk after every meal, they are much more manageable. I sleep with the fan on at night even in the winter and drink lots of water.


I think each person going through the “change” has to find out what works best for them. I do agree that Suzanne Somers has some interesting information you might want to check out.


Good luck to you!
 

RobinB

Well-Known Member
I can't take hormones either, due to the type of breast cancer I had years ago. My doctor did recommend a supplement called "Serenol," which is used to treat both PMS and menopausal symptoms. I have to say, the first day I took it -- I had no night time hot flashes. Fixed it in one day. I took for a few months and then stopped. Check with your doctor about it.
 

HeIsRisen

Well-Known Member
I take estrodiol, which is estrogen, and sometimes, I still have hot flashes. Other times, I don't take it and don't have hot flashes. I have lost 75% of my hair, like so many women in my family, and the hormones aren't helping with that. I think I am going to stop taking the hormones, because, for me, I am not seeing a real result from them. I had a partial hx (still have both ovaries) in 2010 and am going thru menopause now (age 52). I have not had all this "rage" problem that some seem to have. I am calmer, actually, after the surgery.
Last month my rx for the estrodiol ran out so I missed it for a month. I had been having hot flashes the month before, on the hormone. Then, the month I didn't take it, I really didn't have that many. Then, I went back on it and haven't had that many, but all in all, I think I want to go ahead and get it over with, one way or another, and not be chained to this pill anymore.
 

Cloud Watcher

Well-Known Member
I couldn't take Premarin because it gave me severe nausea as a side effect, so bad that I could barely function. It didn't help to take it just before I fell asleep. A different doc gave me something that came as a patch. It worked great until I developed an allergy to the adhesive...very itchy rash. I did without for awhile, then one day the hot flashes were driving me crazy and I put on one of the leftover patches. I ripped it off minutes later due to the itching.

I read an article once that said during menopause a woman could have hot flashes a few times a day. HA! I had them every 10 to 15 minutes. I took my temperature during a flash once, out of curiosity. It was over 102 degrees. I used to spend a lot of time standing In front of a fan.
 

Lynn

Well-Known Member
I read an article once that said during menopause a woman could have hot flashes a few times a day. HA! I had them every 10 to 15 minutes. I took my temperature during a flash once, out of curiosity. It was over 102 degrees. I used to spend a lot of time standing In front of a fan.
Yep, fans still work. No side effects, allergies, etc., to worry about. Just make sure not to stand too close & get your hair caught in the blades. I think our great grandmothers only worried about this. :confused:
 

madcat

Well-Known Member
I couldn't take Premarin because it gave me severe nausea as a side effect, so bad that I could barely function. It didn't help to take it just before I fell asleep. A different doc gave me something that came as a patch. It worked great until I developed an allergy to the adhesive...very itchy rash. I did without for awhile, then one day the hot flashes were driving me crazy and I put on one of the leftover patches. I ripped it off minutes later due to the itching.

I read an article once that said during menopause a woman could have hot flashes a few times a day. HA! I had them every 10 to 15 minutes. I took my temperature during a flash once, out of curiosity. It was over 102 degrees. I used to spend a lot of time standing In front of a fan.
Just an FYI. I had a partial hysterectomy in 1980, and had very low estrogen levels because of scar tissue strangulating the remaining ovaries, so went on HRT about 7 yrs. later. My low estrogen was causing hair loss, acne, and a dangerous “flip flop” of cholesterol levels, as well as the typical hot flashes and extreme mood swings. The oral HRT was horrible, and tried switching to patches in 2000. I have always been allergic to most “bandaids” and some tapes. I tried Climara, and they made me itch as well as not staying on, and several other brands. Finally I was prescribed Vivelle Dot, and have had no issues with it. I’m on the lowest dose with no side effects.
After having the remaining tubes/ovaries removed in 2017 due to ovarian tumor, my OB/GYN still prescribes the Vivelle since it helps to combat tissue dryness.
As for hair loss, NOTHING will make that come back, short of a miracle. Thank goodness there are hair replacement options these days!
 
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