How should a Christian view politics?

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Andy C

Reborn to fly
I know who I will vote for, but does it really matter? Can our votes have an affect on who God will appoint?


Question: "How should a Christian view politics?"

Answer:
If there is anything that will spark a spontaneous debate, if not an outright argument, it is a discussion involving politics—even among believers. As followers of Christ, what should be our attitude and our involvement with politics? It has been said that “religion and politics don’t mix.” But is that really true? Can we have political views outside the considerations of our Christian faith? The answer is no, we cannot. The Bible gives us two truths regarding our stance towards politics and government.

The first truth is that the will of God permeates and supersedes every aspect of life. It is God’s will that takes precedence over everything and everyone (Matthew 6:33). God’s plans and purposes are fixed, and His will is inviolable. What He has purposed, He will bring to pass, and no government can thwart His will (Daniel 4:34-35). In fact, it is God who “sets up kings and deposes them” (Daniel 2:21) because “the Most High is sovereign over the kingdoms of men and gives them to anyone he wishes” (Daniel 4:17). A clear understanding of this truth will help us to see that politics is merely a method God uses to accomplish His will. Even though evil men abuse their political power, meaning it for evil, God means it for good, working “all things together for the good of those who love him, who have been called according to his purpose” (Romans 8:28).

Second, we must grasp the fact that our government cannot save us! Only God can. We never read in the New Testament of Jesus or any of the apostles expending any time or energy schooling believers on how to reform the pagan world of its idolatrous, immoral, and corrupt practices via the government. The apostles never called for believers to demonstrate civil disobedience to protest the Roman Empire's unjust laws or brutal schemes. Instead, the apostles commanded the first-century Christians, as well as us today, to proclaim the gospel and live lives that give clear evidence to the gospel’s transforming power.

There is no doubt that our responsibility to government is to obey the laws and be good citizens (Romans 13:1-2). God has established all authority, and He does so for our benefit, “to commend those who do right” (1 Peter 2:13-15). Paul tells us in Romans 13:1-8 that it is the government’s responsibility to rule in authority over us—hopefully for our good—to collect taxes, and to keep the peace. Where we have a voice and can elect our leaders, we should exercise that right by voting for those whose views most closely parallel our own.

One of Satan’s grandest deceptions is that we can rest our hope for cultural morality and godly living in politicians and governmental officials. A nation’s hope for change is not to be found in any country’s ruling class. The church has made a mistake if it thinks that it is the job of politicians to defend, to advance, and to guard biblical truths and Christian values.

The church’s unique, God-given purpose does not lie in political activism. Nowhere in Scripture do we have the directive to spend our energy, our time, or our money in governmental affairs. Our mission lies not in changing the nation through political reform, but in changing hearts through the Word of God. When believers think the growth and influence of Christ can somehow be allied with government policy, they corrupt the mission of the church. Our Christian mandate is to spread the gospel of Christ and to preach against the sins of our time. Only as the hearts of individuals in a culture are changed by Christ will the culture begin to reflect that change.

Believers throughout the ages have lived, and even flourished, under antagonistic, repressive, pagan governments. This was especially true of the first-century believers who, under merciless political regimes, sustained their faith under immense cultural stress. They understood that it was they, not their governments, who were the light of the world and the salt of the earth. They adhered to Paul’s teaching to obey their governing authorities, even to honor, respect, and pray for them (Romans 13:1-8). More importantly, they understood that, as believers, their hope resided in the protection that only God supplies. The same holds true for us today. When we follow the teachings of the Scriptures, we become the light of the world as God has intended for us to be (Matthew 5:16).

Political entities are not the savior of the world. The salvation for all mankind has been manifested in Jesus Christ. God knew that our world needed saving long before any national government was ever founded. He demonstrated to the world that redemption could not be accomplished through the power of man, his economic strength, his military might, or his politics. Peace of mind, contentment, hope and joy—and the salvation of mankind—is accomplished only through His work of faith, love, and grace.

http://www.gotquestions.org/Christian-politics.html
 

Simon of Syrene

Well-Known Member
Our hope first and foremost is in God.
Political leaders from Nimrod,Pharaoh, Nebuchadnezzar, Cyrus, ,Ceaser, Jezebel, Hitler have all one thing in common serve themselves and look inward to themselves.


The minute we put our trust in these earthly rulers we get disappointed. I don't know if any God friendly government on earth and there won't be any until the Prince of Peace comes.
My view in UK is that politics is corrosive and all I want to know is Christ him crucified and nothing!
 

Andy C

Reborn to fly
Even if against their conscience? 1 Corinthians 10 is quite instructive here. Also, to put your politics ahead of another's conscience is sin to the one you are putting pressure on to vote.
Maybe it's just me, but I don't see the connection between voting and the verse you referenced.
 
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Steve53

Well-Known Member
Even if against their conscience? 1 Corinthians 10 is quite instructive here. Also, to put your politics ahead of another's conscience is sin to the one you are putting pressure on to vote.
It's not about pressuring anyone to vote against their conscience. It's about being salt and light, and not standing aside in the face of evil. One need not be a fan of either candidate in a binary election. One merely needs to discern the policy differences and leave the politics of personality aside. The Dem agenda is evil and should be restrained.
 

Andrew

Well known member
It's not about pressuring anyone to vote against their conscience. It's about being salt and light, and not standing aside in the face of evil. One need not be a fan of either candidate in a binary election. One merely needs to discern the policy differences and leave the politics of personality aside. The Dem agenda is evil and should be restrained.
Then you should vote according to your conscience. How another votes (or chooses not to) is between them and God. It really is not your business.
 

Steve53

Well-Known Member
Then you should vote according to your conscience. How another votes (or chooses not to) is between them and God. It really is not your business.
When a Brother or Sister volunteers that they are making the choice to not make a choice, and therefore not take the opportunity to take a no personal risk stand against evil when every vote counts, it is very much our business.

It very much becomes our business when they make it known they wish to have no part in the final outcome and wish to wash their hands of the matter altogether even though a negative outcome as a direct result of apathy will adversely affect them too.

And we would be horribly remiss to not counsel them against making such a foolish choice.

When someone says voluntarily they can't vote "for" either candidate as a matter of conscience, reasoning with them to vote "against" the greater perceived evil is an appeal to their conscience and entirely appropriate.

But all we can do is counsel them. We cannot and should not force our will upon them. That's not what counseling is all about. We should always help each other avoid snares and stumbling - with encouraging words, sound reasoning, and when necessary, sound rebuke.

The rest, as you said Andrew, is between them and God.
 

Andy C

Reborn to fly
When a Brother or Sister volunteers that they are making the choice to not make a choice, and therefore not take the opportunity to take a no personal risk stand against evil when every vote counts, it is very much our business.

.
Amen Steve, well said.:hat
 

jonshaff

Fellow Servant
Hello my brothers and sisters. I am a bit confused about a specific phrase "Stand against evil?" So voting Democrat is a sin? Please clarify this. Thank you!
 

greg64

Well-Known Member
Voting democrat may not be a sin, but there's ample evidence that many of Hillary's actions are evil and so are her plans for this country. If someone wants to vote for her with that knowledge, they take a share in the responsibility for the outcome. I respect people who vote for an alternative candidate if said person best reflects their beliefs or as an alternative to the two mains if he/she can't support either. But not to vote at all is a tough one...
 

lightofmylife

Blessed Hope-Prepare To Fly!
Voting democrat may not be a sin, but there's ample evidence that many of Hillary's actions are evil and so are her plans for this country. If someone wants to vote for her with that knowledge, they take a share in the responsibility for the outcome. I respect people who vote for an alternative candidate if said person best reflects their beliefs or as an alternative to the two mains if he/she can't support either. But not to vote at all is a tough one...
I understand what you mean. I am voting for Trump because I agree with his issues such as pro-life, protecting our borders(no open borders), taking common core out of schools, economy(jobs), etc.
 

greg64

Well-Known Member
I already absentee voted for him because I'm 100% sure what we'll get with a Clinton presidency, and I don't want any part of it. With Trump, I dislike many of the choices he's made and the way he's gone about things, but at least there's hope he will do the right thing in office. And he has said the right things on many of my primary issues, so I guess we'll see. I could also see voting Libertarian or Constitution party, but realistically doing either just is one less vote against Hillary. Trying to stop her is my main thing this time around.
 

Andrew

Well known member
But all we can do is counsel them. We cannot and should not force our will upon them. That's not what counseling is all about. We should always help each other avoid snares and stumbling - with encouraging words, sound reasoning, and when necessary, sound rebuke.
Do you mean that you intend rebuking them for not voting as you do?
 

Steve53

Well-Known Member
Do you mean that you intend rebuking them for not voting as you do?
Not necessarily, no. As with anything else, context is key. For example, if our hypothetical Brother or Sister vociferously rejected a host of sound reasons why it's important to vote against the satanic progressive left agenda with emotionalism sans reason, then a rebuke to consider reasonable discernment over emotion might be warranted. It really depends upon the individual's specific manner and objections to voting altogether.

We're never going to have a perfect candidate. It is unreasonable to ascribe unattainable standards to anyone running for elected office. The argument to not vote at all according to conscience is a cop out IMHO. It's akin to that of Pilate washing his hands.
 

Steve53

Well-Known Member
So voting Democrat is a sin?
Setting partisanship aside, I'm not sure where voting falls on the "sin-o-meter" - that's why it's important to find out as much about a candidate as one can.

What Christian can support partial birth abortion? Is "your" candidate for murdering babies in the womb? Do you, as a Christian have no problem with abortion? If you have a problem with abortion, then that candidate better not be for abortion. Get it?

A series of "gotcha" questions might be something like "Well, what if everyone running was for abortion? What then? Wouldn't that be a "conscience" reason to not vote at all?

The simple answer is "no." Why? Because there are still other policies on the platform.

In my life, I've voted Independent, Libertarian, Democrat and Republican. It all came down to who was running, what the office was they were running for, and their platform positions as they directly affect the three primary roles of government -
provide for the common defense,
the fair and just formation, enforcement and administration of impartial laws,
and taking care of infrastructure (roads, bridges, water delivery, etc.).

It's a sin filled secular world we live in. There aren't any perfect choices. In binary elections, there is only the choice between the lesser of the two perceived evils.

To make the choice to not decide is to make the choice to allow evil free rein. To make an uniformed choice is nearly as dangerous.
 

Andrew

Well known member
The argument to not vote at all according to conscience is a cop out IMHO. It's akin to that of Pilate washing his hands.
And if the conscience of the Christian concerned simply cannot allow him/her to vote for any of the candidates then are you advocating that they should go against their conscience because your's does allow you to vote? For that is the issue that I was addressing. You seem to keep bringing in straw men to argue your point while condemning the one with the conscience. Likening them to Pilate! Really?
 
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