How do you “study” God’s Word?

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
Do you pick a theme and look up verses on the subject? Do you pick a timeframe or a person to read up on in the Bible? Read articles by authors who are trustworthy?

I’d like to supplement my daily reading with some deeper study, but I’m not sure how to go about it. For instance, I bought the CUTEST pink and purple NIV (it’s now my car Bible) at the thrift store recently. In the back it has sections like A Month of Thankfulness with verses to read each day. Would that be something you’d do to grow in your understanding?

And also, off topic but exciting, my mom scored a Charles Stanley study Bible for $2 that same day. Brand new. Woo hoo.
 

Lastcall

Well-Known Member
Every morning, I read whatever I feel led to read, never knowing ahead of time what I will read. On the rare mornings Im not sure what to read, the book of Romans is always my choice.

To assist me with my understanding of scripture, I spent a lot of days reading all articles and studies from Jack Kelleys site:

https://gracethrufaith.com/


I also listen on line to sermons on you tube from Pastor Andy Woods.

The Arnold Fruchtenbaum book “Footsteps of the Messiah” is a must for studying end times prophecy.
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
Every morning, I read whatever I feel led to read, never knowing ahead of time what I will read. On the rare mornings Im not sure what to read, the book of Romans is always my choice.

To assist me with my understanding of scripture, I spent a lot of days reading all articles and studies from Jack Kelleys site:

https://gracethrufaith.com/


I also listen on line to sermons on you tube from Pastor Andy Woods.

The Arnold Fruchtenbaum book “Footsteps of the Messiah” is a must for studying end times prophecy.

That’s funny, Andy, because I was going through Footsteps last year and have been listening to Pastor Woods. I actually had to stop Footsteps because I found it depressing (I was struggling with depression personally too).
 

Everlasting Life

Through Faith in Jesus
There's another great in depth way to study a passage, long or short, through a process called Homiletics. Don't let this big word scare you, though. This process can really help the reader see things or connect dots where one has not seen before, pull out the lessons in the passage and then look for heart change through application. One year our church's pastors got together to teach the congregation how to do this and it's been such a wonderful tool!

Here's the steps:

1. Write out the content of a passage...only facts.
2. Write out the Divisions of a passage and their titles, where there are natural breaks or shifts in conversations or the story. Again, only the facts.
3 Write out a 10 word (no more) sentence, summing up the whole passage, again, only the facts.

Now here's where things can be even funner:

4. Write out the aim of the passage. That is, what is the main lesson that the passage is seeking to help the reader learn?
5. Write out an application question for each division on how to apply the aim to one's life, with the goal of inner transformation of the heart then one's life.

Again, don't let this overwhelm you, Homiletics is a great tool to really delve deeper in the word and grow spiritually.

Kerbluey....if you'd like, I'd be happy to go through this process with you with a passage you enjoy, taking step by step at a time together to show you how this can be so helpful in bible study. Let me know. :)
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
There's another great in depth way to study a passage, long or short, through a process called Homiletics. Don't let this big word scare you, though. This process can really help the reader see things or connect dots where one has not seen before, pull out the lessons in the passage and then look for heart change through application. One year our church's pastors got together to teach the congregation how to do this and it's been such a wonderful tool!

Here's the steps:

1. Write out the content of a passage...only facts.
2. Write out the Divisions of a passage and their titles, where there are natural breaks or shifts in conversations or the story. Again, only the facts.
3 Write out a 10 word (no more) sentence, summing up the whole passage, again, only the facts.

Now here's where things can be even funner:

4. Write out the aim of the passage. That is, what is the main lesson that the passage is seeking to help the reader learn?
5. Write out an application question for each division on how to apply the aim to one's life, with the goal of inner transformation of the heart then one's life.

Again, don't let this overwhelm you, Homiletics is a great tool to really delve deeper in the word and grow spiritually.

Kerbluey....if you'd like, I'd be happy to go through this process with you with a passage you enjoy, taking step by step at a time together to show you how this can be so helpful in bible study. Let me know. :)

Ive never heard of this technique, but it sounds fascinating. I’m aware of a similar albeit less thorough technique of reading a passage then writing it down in kind of a paraphrase to better understand it. I’d love to do the homiletic process with you, thank you!, and I think it would benefit others. I’ll be thinking about a passage. I’m tempted, of course, to choose a difficult one, but instead I’ll pick something simple, lol.
 

Everlasting Life

Through Faith in Jesus
Ive never heard of this technique, but it sounds fascinating. I’m aware of a similar albeit less thorough technique of reading a passage then writing it down in kind of a paraphrase to better understand it. I’d love to do the homiletic process with you, thank you!, and I think it would benefit others. I’ll be thinking about a passage. I’m tempted, of course, to choose a difficult one, but instead I’ll pick something simple, lol.

Ok, sounds good! :)
 

Nemophilist

Well-Known Member
My method is pretty simple. I read whatever passages I feel led to read, then I write a summary of it in my own words in a notebook. This helps me to understand and remember it better. For several days I've been studying Romans 12. So much wonderful wisdom there.
 

Jan51

Well-Known Member
Here is something I wrote a few years back that you might find helpful.



BIBLE STUDY STRATEGIES

Do you ever wish you didn't have to rely on someone else's teaching for Bible study? Would you like to learn how to move your Bible reading up to the next level--of studying for yourself? These strategies are based on reading strategies teachers use with their students to help them learn how good readers interact with a book rather than simply reading through it. In working with these strategies in a school setting, I began to think of them in relation to the Bible. I used them as a starting point, then tweaked them and expanded on them to apply to Bible study. You will probably think up more questions of your own, but these questions will get you started.

* * * * * * * * * * * *

After reading through a passage for content, go back and reread for meaning. As you reread, stop often to reflect and ask questions--interact with the text. Your questions, which may appear to be "talking to yourself," are actually a way of entering into a conversation with the Author of the book: God (the Holy Spirit). This type of "conversation" will help you to personally connect with the text. Instead of your Bible reading time being an exercise that never impacts your thinking or your life, interacting with God's Word helps you find personal meaning and leads to spiritual growth.

1. Questioning: What did I notice in this passage? Begin by asking who, what, when, where, why, how questions. How does this relate to what I already know about this idea or character? Where can the answer to my questions can be found: cross-references? margin notes I have made? other study books? Pastor, teacher or friends? Can I read selectively if I need to find the answer to a particular question?

2. Making connections: What do I already know that the Bible says about this? Where else in the Bible have I read something related to this? Do I need to note in my margin that this relates to another helpful passage? Have I or someone I know experienced anything like this? How does this passage help me to better understand God, the Bible, how God works, and what is happening in my life?

3. Visualizing: Can I picture this story, the context, the situation, or even a similar present-day situation in my mind? Does a "movie in my head" help this passage come to life and help me personally relate to this situation? What facial expression or tone of voice do I hear or see? What other expression or tone might give a different meaning? How might this person be feeling? How would I feel?

4. Inferring: Biblical truths aren't always stated in exact words in a given passage. Can I infer a biblical truth from this story or passage? Can I combine elements from various passages to determine the truth? Does this confirm something I knew or wondered about, or does it cause me to revise my thinking?

5. Determining importance: Can I pick out the main point from the less important details? Can I state in my own words--not quoting exact words--the main point of this passage? this chapter? this book? the entire Bible?

6. Synthesizing: How can I apply this knowledge to my life, so that my knowledge becomes understanding? How can I change my thoughts, or my reactions in a specific situation, to better line up with God's Word? Can I identify more than one layer of meaning in this passage?

7. Interacting with the Author: What does the Author want me to know about this topic? Why has He included this in His book? Why is He spending so much time on this scene, character, topic, or fact? Have I figured out the Author's "Big Idea"? This passage was not originally addressed to me--how is God speaking to me through this passage?
 

RonJohnSilver

Well-Known Member
I use a modified Bible reading plan that I downloaded. It is thematic so it skips around some, not a lot. Anyway, I read that day's passage, then read the commentary for that passage, usually from EnduringWord.com which is free and easy to use. Sometimes, I also read Warren Wiersbe's commentary for that day's passage. Unrelated to that daily study, I'll read books on Biblical characters or subjects that are of particular interest. Or sometimes authors who produce something new. So, today's daily scripture was from Psalms, then the commentary. Later, I continued Michael Heiser's book on Angels. Hope you find something that works for you.
 

JoyJoyJoy

I Shall Not Be Moved
I found a Chronological Bible @ the thrift store...it goes through the Bible in a year. I am loving it. It is such a.nice sized bite to read and digest daily. I have missed some days and it's easy to catch up without getting overwhelmed.
 

Bethlehem57

Well-Known Member
Rotational reading in Psalms/Proverbs + wherever else I may be reading in OT/NT + Subject study is my typical manner.
Same here. I love to dig into Scripture and see what historically was happening at that time, as well as the meaning of the words in the specific verses I’m in. For example, last night we started digging into Psalm 139 and in the NKJV “O LORD…”. the word LORD used here means Yahweh, the Creator, and it’s has the same meaning as when Moses asked God, who shall I say has sent me? And God said “I AM.”
 

JoyJoyJoy

I Shall Not Be Moved
love to dig into Scripture and see what historically was happening at that time, as well as the meaning of the words in the specific verses I’m in.
I like to know what was happening in the world also.

I love Roman and Egyptian history and its amazing how many idols they worshipped. Also how Pharoahs held themselves to be gods.

Geography is a weak point for me. I am going to try to incorporate it into my studies.
 

Everlasting Life

Through Faith in Jesus
I once started a chronological reading plan but then got bogged down in Job.
EverlastingLife, I haven’t forgotten, just been busy.

No worries Kerbluey, take your time. I'm sure in God's timing it will be the right time. :)

I was thinking that when your ready, it might be a good idea to start a different thread so as to keep this one separate. :)
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
I'm more of a "Through the Bible" kind of guy with a teacher I trust, like the late Dr. Missler. Or at least I used to be. Now I find myself kind of revisiting passages that had a stronger impression on me or that were recently brought to my attention in some way. Since it has been several years now, I probably owe it to myself to read straight through from beginning to end again sometime soon.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
@Kerbluey can I suggest a Bible on tape or whatever audio device you have. I suppose it's available as an podcast now, almost everything seems to have changed since I used to listen to it on audiotape.

George and I found a YouTube channel when we discovered YouTube that just has the KJV being read aloud.

Why I say all that is because when people are busy doing housework, or cooking etc or driving or waiting for someone, the audio bible can be a really good way to soak in some Scripture.

Sometimes there is a bit of judgment we take on when we see how other people study the Bible. It's not intended but we can feel guilty we don't do it "the right way". I've never done well in other people's systems whether it's a "morning quiet time" or a devotional study guide or a planned Bible in a year -- I've done them, and I've benefited but they don't come easy to me because nothing Bible comes easy. That is because Satan is engaging his minions to stop Christians from Prayer, and Bible Reading.

But the point is to just get in there. In whatever way works. What works for me probably looks dreadful to serious Bible scholars. But I'm telling you so you can maybe work out your own system.

Whether listening to audio tapes, or reading a book out of sequence because it's extra exciting with a load of fascinating prophecy.

What dries a person up is feeling like they are out of sequence to the reading plan and always trying to catch up in the whobegats or some such feeling. That is a roadblock to absorbing the Bible along with many others I've discovered. Satan specializes in roadblocks to prevent the Christian from eating up the Word of God to nourish their spirit.

But it's a plate of food. Some people eat it systematically, others make tunnels in their mashed potatoes, with gravy lakes, then work down to the vegetables last, others take a bite out of the meat, then the veggies and eat in a more balanced fashion. I'm not that type. I dive in face first to the fun stuff but as I read, the other stuff opens up. Eventually the Holy Spirit makes sure I'm attracted to the vegetables.

Back to Bible on audio

I use to feel it was almost a sin to be listening to God's Word and cleaning the living room. Something in me said I ought to be sitting up, paying full attention, not doing anything else.

But I was a young mother back then working long shifts as an RN on call, juggling home and family and work. I fought that legalistic urge and just let the Word play over me thru the day as I cooked, cleaned and yes, drove.

Things would jump out at me that I would rewind, listen again. Other times I couldn't remember much at all.

But to this day I hear a phrase bubbling up in my spirit, a fragment of a verse or part of a passage. I don't recall memorizing it, although I did a bit of that with my Christian grandfather on my mother's side. It's enough to point me to Strong's concordance to find it, or as I often do here, to do a google search on that passage fragment to find the whole passage.

I gave my set of tapes to a friend who had a severely autistic son with multiple behaviour problems. She didn't have any time to herself at all because her son Daniel was constantly doing something destructive as long as he was awake and she couldn't rest.

But she did have to drive her other son to and from school every day, and she would pop in a tape and listen. Daniel was buckled in the back, out of trouble and she said that was a lifesaver for her.

I tend to read more now, I have the time and I put markers into spots where I see something that really grabs me. I go back again and again. Right now I have a LOT of bits of torn up paper markers-- I'll go count-- 37

Those are ones that are grabbing at me right now. I'm in there pretty regularly. Every time I read them I see different things, so I go check out my esword to see the way it is in the Hebrew or the Greek with the Strongs definitions to see if there's something more, and there usually is.

While counting the other paper markers I remembered the post it notes in the fly leaf that have lists of particularly useful verses that I often seem to refer to. I've written out the "Romans Road" to Salvation, a set of verses that can guide a person to salvation using just Romans.

I use a highlighter pen, and make notes in the margins.

It looks messy and like I don't respect the Word of God but I really really do. I find that using highlighter helps me remember passages that are important to me to refer back to quickly.

And esword is free to download, it's best on a desktop machine or ipad, something big enough to read all the split screens because looking at a passage in esword's KJV keyed to Strongs means looking at it under a microscope, and that is when the words show up the shades of meaning that really add to the passage.

Hope that helps

from someone who used to find it SO hard, because I was trying to do it the way it's "Supposed" to be done. When I gave up and just went in face first to what was interesting me at the time, and studied the daylights out of it, then I began to thrive. Oh and the audio stuff, that really helped at a time when I didn't have a lot of time to sit and read but I could listen and get things done at the same time.
 
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