Helping the lonely on Christmas

Goodboy

Well-Known Member
The thought came to me that it would really be a great gesture to invite someone to dinner who either has no family or is just unable to be with their family on Christmas. However, for most of us that could become awkward as your extended family may not want some stranger around at Christmas dinner. I then thought of a compromise. As depressing as being alone on Christmas may be, it would be much more tolerable if you knew the day after Christmas you would be invited to a dinner. So we could just tell someone who will be alone, that while we are unable to invite them for Christmas dinner on December 25th, we would love for them to attend our celebration on December 26th.

Not sure if this is a good idea or not, but I thought I would just put it out there. :idunno
 
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JamesSuth

Well-Known Member
The thought came to me that it would really be a great gesture to invite someone to dinner who either has no family or is just unable to be with their family on Christmas. However, for must of us that could become awkward as your extended family may not want some stranger around at Christmas dinner. I then thought of a compromise. As depressing as being alone on Christmas may be, it would be much more tolerable if you knew the day after Christmas you would be invited to a dinner. So we could just tell someone who will be alone, that while we are unable to invite them for Christmas dinner on December 25th, we would love for them to attend our celebration on December 26th.

Not sure if this is a good idea or not, but I thought I would just put it out there. :idunno
I think that is a good idea :thumbup! I had a very similar thought a few days ago, but I promise that's not why I think its a good idea. In my own case it was thinking about the future, when one or two people I know well won't have their family any more (elderly relatives), but I'm left thinking that extended family might feel awkward. I think this is a nice compromise idea that could make people feel very welcomed, while not disappointing family.
 

Andy C

Semper Fi
The thought came to me that it would really be a great gesture to invite someone to dinner who either has no family or is just unable to be with their family on Christmas. However, for must of us that could become awkward as your extended family may not want some stranger around at Christmas dinner. I then thought of a compromise. As depressing as being alone on Christmas may be, it would be much more tolerable if you knew the day after Christmas you would be invited to a dinner. So we could just tell someone who will be alone, that while we are unable to invite them for Christmas dinner on December 25th, we would love for them to attend our celebration on December 26th.

Not sure if this is a good idea or not, but I thought I would just put it out there. :idunno
Either day sounds like a great idea.

While in the Marines, many marines who were married would invite single Marines over for Christmas dinner, and so did many civilian families. Being a Marine can be a hard life, and being single far away from home makes it even harder on holidays.

Giving money can be easy for holidays, but giving your personal time or sharing your house, thats not easy, but thoroughly enjoyable when able to do so.
 

ShilohRose

Well-Known Member
In the little community where I grew up, one of the churches hosts a Christmas dinner, and it's free for anyone who wants to come. My parents are thinking of going this year. I won't be able to visit until after Christmas. Mom said that several of the widows at their church have said that it was really nice. You could have a nice Christmas meal with people in town you knew.

The town is small, around 2000 people, and it's a big undertaking for a church, but I'm glad they do it.

When Momma was younger, we would have people over for Christmas dinner; I liked it.
 

kathymendel

Well-Known Member
Mmmmmm......... If I were hosting Christmas dinner in my home for my family, I would invite the lonely person to join us. I would want their Christmas Day to be special...........not the day after and not with leftovers. Sorry, just my take on it. Instead of worrying about whether my family members would be "uncomfortable"........... I would hope the situation would teach them compassion and inclusiveness. It's not that hard. These are things that have been lost to us over the years. What harm would one extra person cause to a family event???? We should be opening our hearts - and homes - to others who have no one to care.
 

Goodboy

Well-Known Member
Mmmmmm......... If I were hosting Christmas dinner in my home for my family, I would invite the lonely person to join us. I would want their Christmas Day to be special...........not the day after and not with leftovers. Sorry, just my take on it. Instead of worrying about whether my family members would be "uncomfortable"........... I would hope the situation would teach them compassion and inclusiveness. It's not that hard. These are things that have been lost to us over the years. What harm would one extra person cause to a family event???? We should be opening our hearts - and homes - to others who have no one to care.
Kathymendel, I would agree that if possible, inviting some lonely person over at Christmas would be best. However, there are many cases when that is either not possible or not wise. For instance if you are going away to some family members house for Christmas or if the person you are inviting is very arrogant and somewhat mean and my disrupt the occasion. In any case, this was just an alternate suggestion, not saying it is the best thing to do. :)
 
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kathymendel

Well-Known Member
Kathymendel, I would agree that if possible, inviting some lonely person over at Christmas would be best. However, there are many cases when that is either not possible or not wise. For instance if you are going away to some family members house for Christmas or if the person you are inviting is very arrogant and somewhat mean and my disrupt the occasion. In any case, this was just an alternate suggestion, not saying it is the best thing to do. :)
Okay...............gotcha. :hug
 

Laura from Boston

Active Member
Not looking forward to Christmas in that it is very lonely. Most of my family is gone and I can't really visit people's homes because I am wheelchair dependent. I also don't have a church. It's important that people are thinking of the lonely on Christmas. It never gets easier for me.
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
Not looking forward to Christmas in that it is very lonely. Most of my family is gone and I can't really visit people's homes because I am wheelchair dependent. I also don't have a church. It's important that people are thinking of the lonely on Christmas. It never gets easier for me.
I‘m so sorry, Laura. I’ll probably be online if you’d like to p.m. me.
 

Kaatje

Listening for that trumpet sound
The thought came to me that it would really be a great gesture to invite someone to dinner who either has no family or is just unable to be with their family on Christmas. However, for most of us that could become awkward as your extended family may not want some stranger around at Christmas dinner. I then thought of a compromise. As depressing as being alone on Christmas may be, it would be much more tolerable if you knew the day after Christmas you would be invited to a dinner. So we could just tell someone who will be alone, that while we are unable to invite them for Christmas dinner on December 25th, we would love for them to attend our celebration on December 26th.

Not sure if this is a good idea or not, but I thought I would just put it out there. :idunno
We have 2 services on Christmas-day. And we asked everyone from our church who isn’t elswhere engaged to come between the services to our place, for coffee, lunch and “gezelligheid” (Dutch word, untranslatable).
 

mattfivefour

Administrator
Staff member
We have 2 services on Christmas-day. And we asked everyone from our church who isn’t elswhere engaged to come between the services to our place, for coffee, lunch and “gezelligheid” (Dutch word, untranslatable).
For those who don't speak Dutch but would like to understand the word Kaatje used, here is what wordfinder days:

"Gezelligheid is a Dutch abstract noun (adjective form gezellig) which, depending on context, can be translated as convivial, cosy, fun, or nice atmosphere, but can also connote belonging, time spent with loved ones, the fact of seeing a friend after a long absence, or general togetherness that gives a warm feeling."
 

ItIsFinished!

Well-Known Member
For those who don't speak Dutch but would like to understand the word Kaatje used, here is what wordfinder days:

"Gezelligheid is a Dutch abstract noun (adjective form gezellig) which, depending on context, can be translated as convivial, cosy, fun, or nice atmosphere, but can also connote belonging, time spent with loved ones, the fact of seeing a friend after a long absence, or general togetherness that gives a warm feeling."
Thank you because I did want to know.
(Trying to brush up on my Dutch ;) ).
It sounds like I'm angry when I try to pronounce it. Kinda like certain German words.
 
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