Getting in Shape

Andy C

Well-Known Member
I have been following strongman competitions, and one person in particular, Brian Shaw, a four time winner of Worlds Strongest Man. Him and his wife post a lot of videos, very family friendly and entertaining.

He recently competed at a body weight of 430 pounds, 6’8” tall.

He is now trying to trim down to a lean 380 pounds. Him and his equally fit wife went to a medical center, and had their body fat measured through a highly accurate scan machine. She was 21.2. And at a body weight of now 414 pounds, he was 17.8, and his scan showed 330 pounds of solid muscle. Gone are the days of fat strongman.

Why did I post this...:idunno. Maybe as I go through political withdrawal syndrome, (PWS) this distraction helps.
 

Spartan Sprinter 1

Formerly known as Shaun
I have been following strongman competitions, and one person in particular, Brian Shaw, a four time winner of Worlds Strongest Man. Him and his wife post a lot of videos, very family friendly and entertaining.

He recently competed at a body weight of 430 pounds, 6’8” tall.

He is now trying to trim down to a lean 380 pounds. Him and his equally fit wife went to a medical center, and had their body fat measured through a highly accurate scan machine. She was 21.2. And at a body weight of now 414 pounds, he was 17.8, and his scan showed 330 pounds of solid muscle. Gone are the days of fat strongman.

Why did I post this...:idunno. Maybe as I go through political withdrawal syndrome, (PWS) this distraction helps.

I don't blame you, sports was originally supposed to be an escape from politics and the business side of life.

I also like watching docos of strongmen and bodybuilders just to see how they train and seeing them go through their ups and downs of the competitions they compete in
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
I don't blame you, sports was originally supposed to be an escape from politics and the business side of life.

I also like watching docos of strongmen and bodybuilders just to see how they train and seeing them go through their ups and downs of the competitions they compete in
Im not sure if I mentioned this before, but if you want some good laughs, and a few cringe worthy moments, go to You Tube, and search “gym fails”. Its amazing how many silly mistakes are made, especially with the many crossfit accidents.
 

Spartan Sprinter 1

Formerly known as Shaun
Im not sure if I mentioned this before, but if you want some good laughs, and a few cringe worthy moments, go to You Tube, and search “gym fails”. Its amazing how many silly mistakes are made, especially with the many crossfit accidents.
I'm familiar with the crossfit fails, the worst video i seen and it was complete stupidity was a woman who is a cross fitter who attempted a deadlift whilst wearing stilletoes and broke her ankle .
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
WARNING - woman in the men's room -

Royal Canadian Air Force Exercises. The book from the 50s or early 60s. Fast progression, no equipment needed, and not too much time required, especially since you can do them at home. I used to do them with my Dad when I was a little kid :smile The men's program is good for both men and women. Sweating to the Oldies if you want more or different cardio.

High protein and limit carbs. Atkins is good, but induction phase is brutal. Even if you don't do Atkins, their information about carb content in various foods, and carb-protein strategies, is very helpful.

Lots and lots of water. Preferably with squeezed fresh lemon.

No artificial colors, flavors, or sweeteners, and GMOs.
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
WARNING - woman in the men's room -

Royal Canadian Air Force Exercises. The book from the 50s or early 60s. Fast progression, no equipment needed, and not too much time required, especially since you can do them at home. I used to do them with my Dad when I was a little kid :smile The men's program is good for both men and women. Sweating to the Oldies if you want more or different cardio.

High protein and limit carbs. Atkins is good, but induction phase is brutal. Even if you don't do Atkins, their information about carb content in various foods, and carb-protein strategies, is very helpful.

Lots and lots of water. Preferably with squeezed fresh lemon.

No artificial colors, flavors, or sweeteners, and GMOs.
Hey, carbs are my life long buddy and a must for my 42 years of continuous training. Yes, Im pro carbs!
 

Endangered

Well-Known Member
I do a cardio walk about 4 or 5 times a week of 1.4 miles. Been doing that for over 2 years now. I am in decent physical condition in my hips and legs.
The problem us that I am mush from the waist up. Weak lower back and weak in the arms. And recently put on 4 more pounds.
My goal for 2021 is to try to ignore all the worldwide sleaze and build up some strength in my arms and back.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
I do a cardio walk about 4 or 5 times a week of 1.4 miles. Been doing that for over 2 years now. I am in decent physical condition in my hips and legs.
The problem us that I am mush from the waist up. Weak lower back and weak in the arms. And recently put on 4 more pounds.
My goal for 2021 is to try to ignore all the worldwide sleaze and build up some strength in my arms and back.

Those RCAF exercises will help immensely :smile
Also, isometrics while sitting doing something passive, standing in line, waiting at a red light, etc.
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
I'm familiar with the crossfit fails, the worst video i seen and it was complete stupidity was a woman who is a cross fitter who attempted a deadlift whilst wearing stilletoes and broke her ankle .
Im going to alter my training for several weeks in preparing for the “Murph challenge”. If you dont know what that is, the events are listed below. A good time for a first attempt is under 60 minutes.

1 mile run
100 pullups
200 pushups
300 squats - body weight only
1 mile run.

For the pullups,pushups, squats, you can do as many sets as it takes to reach the total. Most people for their first attempt complete 20 sets, with each set consisting of:
5 pullups
10 pushups
15 squats

Breaking it down like this helps keep the same muscles from over working all at once.

The pullups will be hardest for me, as I have only done a few since I retired, and I dont know how to “kip” because in the Marines, pullups were all dead hang only, no swinging the body in a kip to get the chin barely over the bar.

The entire challenge calls for a 20 pound vest to be worn, but I will skip that one for my first attempt.

The workout was a favorite of Navy Lt Michael Murphy, a Navy Seal, killed in 2005, Afghanistan, and Posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. The story of the events on the day of his death are protrayed in the movie “Lone Survivor” starring Mark Wahlburg.

Sounds like a fun, yet extremely challenging workout, followed by a few days of not being able to leave my recliner.... o_O
 
Last edited:

Spartan Sprinter 1

Formerly known as Shaun
Im going to alter my training for several weeks in preparing for the “Murph challenge”. If you dont know what that is, the events are listed below. A good time for a first attempt is under 60 minutes.

1 mile run
100 pullups
200 pushups
300 squats - body weight only
1 mile run.

For the pullups,pushups, squats, you can do as many sets as it takes to reach the total. Most people for their first attempt complete 20 sets, with each set consisting of:
5 pullups
10 pushups
15 squats

Breaking it down like this helps keep the same muscles from over working all at once.

The pullups will be hardest for me, as I have only done a few since I retired, and I dont know how to “kip” because in the Marines, pullups were all dead hang only, no swinging the body in a kip to get the chin barely over the bar.

The entire challenge calls for a 20 pound vest to be worn, but I will skip that one for my first attempt.

The workout was a favorite of Navy Lt Michael Murphy, a Navy Seal, killed in 2005, Afghanistan, and Posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. The story of the events on the day of his death are protrayed in the movie “Lone Survivor” starring Mark Wahlburg.

Sounds like a fun, yet extremely challenging workout, followed by a few days of not being able to leave my recliner.... o_O
Yikes, the pull ups are the worst , especially if the are only counting them from a dead hang position.

You better make sure you've had you A - Z supplements for this event LOL
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
Yikes, the pull ups are the worst , especially if the are only counting them from a dead hang position.

You better make sure you've had you A - Z supplements for this event LOL
Im going to do a mini version Tuesday morning to see if it is something I believe at 63 I can train to accomplish, without getting hurt. I like a good challenge, but my body dictates what I can safely do, not my ego.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
FWIW, having spent most of my adult life having to be in good condition, and having helped a lot of guys with PT tests, conditioning, competitions, races, etc. -

If you have the muscle memory, efficient technique, and do the pushups all at once you can shave a lot of time. Transitioning from one exercise to another wastes time and allows the body to realize it's working hard/tired and build up lactic acid. If I were still on active duty or active LEO and participating, I'd run, squat, pull-up, push-up, then run. If I could get away with doing all the running at once, I'd start with the two miles. 12 minutes for the 2 miles plus another 4 minutes for the push-ups is only 16 minutes. If I had to split it, the second mile would likely take a minute (or more) longer than the first one. Keep in mind, as a woman, especially being short, I have an absolute advantage in squats, which are by far the most time-consuming exercise, most numerous, most likely to cause cramps/joint fatigue, and which require the most balance. As a male, you have an advantage in pull-ups, but there are only 100 of them. Kipping takes time and energy, so I wouldn't unless muscle fatigue/strength makes it necessary. You will want to master this and see which technique is easier/faster/least tiring for you individually. Since you have muscle memory for Marine Corps pull-ups, you may find them easier.

Rationale for the exercise sequence (besides minimizing transition times) is after cardio, all the other exercises will rest your breathing so you can recover cardio-pulmonary-vascular for the other run. The squats will wear on the legs, so you want to rest them before the other run, which the pull-ups will let you do. Push-ups use the other arm muscles, so no issues from the pull-ups, and by that time, the push-ups are simply a balance issue, and will finish allowing the oxygenated blood to refresh the leg muscles and feet, and stretch soft tissues supporting the knees in case the run was required to be split in two. If the run is done all at once, there is still an advantage as the exercises get progressively easier in this order. As an individual/male, you might find a different order, or mixing it up as you're anticipating, might be easier/more advantageous, though.

Upper body strength and cardio-pulmonary-vascular endurance (which men have structural advantage in) are key to competing and finishing, but lower body strength, (which is where most women have more strength), is key to shaving time. I don't know what the rules are for footwear, but combat or jungle boots give extra stability for squats and push-ups. Bare feet reduce the amount of weight/drag during pull-ups. Whatever footwear you are most comfortable with for the run. If changing footwear, practice the transitions to shave more time and prevent the body from realizing it's tired, etc. Sit on the ground with legs apart and knees bent as needed to change or ties shoes/boots instead of squatting, kneeling or bending over, if at all possible, to minimize changes in blood pressure that your body will have to compensate for to even out. If you have to wear the same footwear all the way through, you'll want tighter lacing for the run(s), but you'll have to find your personal preferences. If you do wear a vest (someday), make sure the front of the arm area where it meets the chest is scooped away from your arms and armpits so it doesn't rub, chafe, or cut into muscles or blood flow. A well-broken in one with soft areas there would be good. Loose fit toward the bottom to avoid impaiiring breathing from the diaphragm.

Pre-competition, make sure you're well hydrated and pee (but make sure you don't flush out your electrolytes)
Post-competition, skim milk. It has the electrolytes, minerals, calories, liquid . . . Some people find they need to add Nestle's Quick to the milk. Milk with fat in it could upset the stomach, as could super cold milk. Sip . . .

Wish I could help you train . . . (sadly, afib would keep me from training with you :frown

If the challenge is on Memorial Day, you can start with 1 pull-up, 2 push-ups, and 3 squats on day one, then add 1 pull-up, 2 push-ups, and 3 squats per day (keep the time as short as possible, but make sure form is correct) and more than reach your goal on the counted exercises. This was my strategy for maxing PT tests when recovering from cancer and only having 90 days before taking a record PT test. Made it easy and pain-free. For the run, I started by walking the distance, then added running in small spurts/cut down the amount of walking a little each day, so by test day, endurance and time were max :smile Taking a large dog for the walk/run helped, too. Video yourself while doing exercises so you're sure to get the form right and develop correct muscle memory (makes everything easier).

Just looked, and there are a lot of websites with tips, etc. for the competition :smile

God's blessings as you train and compete . . .


:pray :pray :amen :amen
 

Spartan Sprinter 1

Formerly known as Shaun
Im going to do a mini version Tuesday morning to see if it is something I believe at 63 I can train to accomplish, without getting hurt. I like a good challenge, but my body dictates what I can safely do, not my ego.

You might be ok, although It's a killer event at least It's all bodyweight exercises.

Do you live near a beach?
The saltwater does wonders for recovery
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
You might be ok, although It's a killer event at least It's all bodyweight exercises.

Do you live near a beach?
The saltwater does wonders for recovery
No, 65 miles away, and the beaches in Oregon are not good. Always very windy, cold, and lots of rain. People dont go to the beach here to sunbathe, they go to rust.

I have not done so in ten years, but I use to take a cold bath with bags of ice after my runs of 15 miles or longer. Best recovery ever.
 

Spartan Sprinter 1

Formerly known as Shaun
No, 65 miles away, and the beaches in Oregon are not good. Always very windy, cold, and lots of rain. People dont go to the beach here to sunbathe, they go to rust.

I have not done so in ten years, but I use to take a cold bath with bags of ice after my runs of 15 miles or longer. Best recovery ever.

Ice baths are good, I use to have an ice bath then hop into a luke warm shower and alternate 2 times between the bath and shower.

Now I can't be bothered stopping to buy the bag of ice and just make do contrast showers
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
FWIW, having spent most of my adult life having to be in good condition, and having helped a lot of guys with PT tests, conditioning, competitions, races, etc. -

If you have the muscle memory, efficient technique, and do the pushups all at once you can shave a lot of time. Transitioning from one exercise to another wastes time and allows the body to realize it's working hard/tired and build up lactic acid. If I were still on active duty or active LEO and participating, I'd run, squat, pull-up, push-up, then run. If I could get away with doing all the running at once, I'd start with the two miles. 12 minutes for the 2 miles plus another 4 minutes for the push-ups is only 16 minutes. If I had to split it, the second mile would likely take a minute (or more) longer than the first one. Keep in mind, as a woman, especially being short, I have an absolute advantage in squats, which are by far the most time-consuming exercise, most numerous, most likely to cause cramps/joint fatigue, and which require the most balance. As a male, you have an advantage in pull-ups, but there are only 100 of them. Kipping takes time and energy, so I wouldn't unless muscle fatigue/strength makes it necessary. You will want to master this and see which technique is easier/faster/least tiring for you individually. Since you have muscle memory for Marine Corps pull-ups, you may find them easier.

Rationale for the exercise sequence (besides minimizing transition times) is after cardio, all the other exercises will rest your breathing so you can recover cardio-pulmonary-vascular for the other run. The squats will wear on the legs, so you want to rest them before the other run, which the pull-ups will let you do. Push-ups use the other arm muscles, so no issues from the pull-ups, and by that time, the push-ups are simply a balance issue, and will finish allowing the oxygenated blood to refresh the leg muscles and feet, and stretch soft tissues supporting the knees in case the run was required to be split in two. If the run is done all at once, there is still an advantage as the exercises get progressively easier in this order. As an individual/male, you might find a different order, or mixing it up as you're anticipating, might be easier/more advantageous, though.

Upper body strength and cardio-pulmonary-vascular endurance (which men have structural advantage in) are key to competing and finishing, but lower body strength, (which is where most women have more strength), is key to shaving time. I don't know what the rules are for footwear, but combat or jungle boots give extra stability for squats and push-ups. Bare feet reduce the amount of weight/drag during pull-ups. Whatever footwear you are most comfortable with for the run. If changing footwear, practice the transitions to shave more time and prevent the body from realizing it's tired, etc. Sit on the ground with legs apart and knees bent as needed to change or ties shoes/boots instead of squatting, kneeling or bending over, if at all possible, to minimize changes in blood pressure that your body will have to compensate for to even out. If you have to wear the same footwear all the way through, you'll want tighter lacing for the run(s), but you'll have to find your personal preferences. If you do wear a vest (someday), make sure the front of the arm area where it meets the chest is scooped away from your arms and armpits so it doesn't rub, chafe, or cut into muscles or blood flow. A well-broken in one with soft areas there would be good. Loose fit toward the bottom to avoid impaiiring breathing from the diaphragm.

Pre-competition, make sure you're well hydrated and pee (but make sure you don't flush out your electrolytes)
Post-competition, skim milk. It has the electrolytes, minerals, calories, liquid . . . Some people find they need to add Nestle's Quick to the milk. Milk with fat in it could upset the stomach, as could super cold milk. Sip . . .

Wish I could help you train . . . (sadly, afib would keep me from training with you :frown

If the challenge is on Memorial Day, you can start with 1 pull-up, 2 push-ups, and 3 squats on day one, then add 1 pull-up, 2 push-ups, and 3 squats per day (keep the time as short as possible, but make sure form is correct) and more than reach your goal on the counted exercises. This was my strategy for maxing PT tests when recovering from cancer and only having 90 days before taking a record PT test. Made it easy and pain-free. For the run, I started by walking the distance, then added running in small spurts/cut down the amount of walking a little each day, so by test day, endurance and time were max :smile Taking a large dog for the walk/run helped, too. Video yourself while doing exercises so you're sure to get the form right and develop correct muscle memory (makes everything easier).

Just looked, and there are a lot of websites with tips, etc. for the competition :smile

God's blessings as you train and compete . . .


:pray :pray :amen :amen
Good info, but my finish time of the event is not important for me. I disagree about doing the exercises one event at a time. Even the top cross fit runners do them in the manner I described up thread, but do more reps in each set.

Pushup are 200 not 100.

The only real concern for me will be pullups. Years ago, 10 sets of 10 would have been easy. Now, sets of 5 will quickly turn to sets of 2 or 3.

That last mile is harder than what you describe. I have watched the top females in the world struggle with wobbly legs from 300 squats on that last mile, and its usually well below the first mile time.

I also trained hundreds of Marines over the years, not always fun, but worked out.
 

Spartan Sprinter 1

Formerly known as Shaun
Good info, but my finish time of the event is not important for me. I disagree about doing the exercises one event at a time. Even the top cross fit runners do them in the manner I described up thread, but do more reps in each set.

Pushup are 200 not 100.

The only real concern for me will be pullups. Years ago, 10 sets of 10 would have been easy. Now, sets of 5 will quickly turn to sets of 2 or 3.

That last mile is harder than what you describe. I have watched the top females in the world struggle with wobbly legs from 300 squats on that last mile, and its usually well below the first mile time.

I also trained hundreds of Marines over the years, not always fun, but worked out.
10 sets of 10 pull ups is insane i'm lucky to make 3 x 10 sets
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Good info, but my finish time of the event is not important for me. I disagree about doing the exercises one event at a time. Even the top cross fit runners do them in the manner I described up thread, but do more reps in each set.

Pushup are 200 not 100.

The only real concern for me will be pullups. Years ago, 10 sets of 10 would have been easy. Now, sets of 5 will quickly turn to sets of 2 or 3.

That last mile is harder than what you describe. I have watched the top females in the world struggle with wobbly legs from 300 squats on that last mile, and its usually well below the first mile time.

I also trained hundreds of Marines over the years, not always fun, but worked out.

Guess we'll agree to disagree on strategy :smile Everyone is different, which is a good thing :smile I have a hard time mixing up exercises and prefer to do one thing until finished, which probably why aerobics/similar and I don't get along. And gorilla PT and wind sprints :rolleyes

I thought I wrote 200 on the push-ups, since 100 per two minutes was our old unit cadence . . . pull-ups would be the hardest for me, too, so I noticed they were the least numerous :biggrin But I know from experience they rest my legs (especially knees) after squats, and push-ups "reset" my leg muscles :lol Maybe I'm just weird.

I enjoyed training soldiers and LEO for PT, etc. :smile The best thing was poking a stick at CSM when he watched all the enlisted in one unit max the PT test multiple times (no one on female standards, so no "cheap" maxes) :biggrin

In any case, enjoy the challenge and may God richly bless your efforts :inlove
 

Andy C

Well-Known Member
Guess we'll agree to disagree on strategy :smile Everyone is different, which is a good thing :smile I have a hard time mixing up exercises and prefer to do one thing until finished, which probably why aerobics/similar and I don't get along. And gorilla PT and wind sprints :rolleyes
Maybe after Tuesdays effort, I will agree with you on the strategy in completing the exercises.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
10 sets of 10 pull ups is insane i'm lucky to make 3 x 10 sets

Add one pull-up per day and watch how fast you progress :smile *Painlessly* because *insignificant* increment of increase, and rapid because frequent (daily) increases :smile

When I was working with weights at the gym, I'd do 3 sets of 15, 3 times, of whatever I was doing. Then add a little weight and do 3 sets of 5. 3 sets of 15 if the new weight felt *light* Then add a little more weight and do one set of 5. Next time at the gym, the starting weight would be the middle weight from the previous. Fast progression and it was *painless.* Also helped avoid plateaus. In all fairness, I was a lot younger then, recovery from cancer to avoid medical discharge was a huge incentive, and my military job was very physical, so functional PT most days, as well.
 
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