Does anyone knit?

LindaR

Well-Known Member
Are the crocheted pot holders dense enough to protect your hand when handling a very hot pan?
Yes...
Here's a picture of what they look like:

They are all made with single crochet and a "G" or "H" crochet hook.

Here's the link to the pattern....it's really easy

http://yayforyarn.com/free-double-thick-potholder-crochet-pattern/

They make great Christmas gifts. Crocheting with cotton yarn is a one of my favorite things to do . I used to make doilies with cotton thread #10 and a #7 or #8 steel crochet hook, but my vision isn't what it used to be, so I stopped doing that.
 

Lynn

Longing for Home
Lynn..
I found some youtube tutorials that I think are easier to follow than just reading the pattern:
This is the pattern I use.
Thanks, Linda. Actually, I don't crochet, just knit. I have seen knitted dish cloths and face cloths done in similar pattern. Thanks for the YouTube tutorial. If I decide to crochet someday, that's likely to be what I start with.
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
Hehe, as a man I'll probably catch flack for this, but I once took the time to learn to knit because it looked like a fun version of of finger kung-fu if that makes sense. I even pearl knitted a small pot holder.

I quickly gave it up after that because I didn't have the patience to make anything. Knitting, at least for me, was a slow and time consuming process.

(Hope it was OK as a guy to post here).
 

Lynn

Longing for Home
I once took the time to learn to knit because it looked like a fun version of of finger kung-fu if that makes sense. I even pearl knitted a small pot holder.

I quickly gave it up after that because I didn't have the patience to make anything. Knitting, at least for me, was a slow and time consuming process.

(Hope it was OK as a guy to post here).
Of course it's OK for a guy to post here.
One of the most talented knitters I know is a young pre-med student who hopes to be a surgeon one day. Good fine motor skills are important in both pursuits, so I hope that he stays with the knitting. It is indeed a slow, time-consuming process, and for that reason, I sometimes get out my sewing machine, as sewing is so-o much faster!
PS: the two main terms used in knitting are knit and 'purl'. Glad you gave it a try.
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
Of course it's OK for a guy to post here.
One of the most talented knitters I know is a young pre-med student who hopes to be a surgeon one day. Good fine motor skills are important in both pursuits, so I hope that he stays with the knitting. It is indeed a slow, time-consuming process, and for that reason, I sometimes get out my sewing machine, as sewing is so-o much faster!
PS: the two main terms used in knitting are knit and 'purl'. Glad you gave it a try.
Thanks Lynn, I appreciate that. Actually what you say makes a great deal of sense as far as being a surgeon goes. Even if it is something as simple as efficiently tying stitches, it probably would also be extremely useful for, like you said, motor control in just about any other situation in surgery where precision and control is everything.

On a related note, about not being too ashamed to be a guy who knits, I once read that knitting was actually developed by sailors (men) to kill time when their other duties were not needed to turn yarn into warm clothes to protect them from the cold. If true, then knitting was invented by men, so no man should be ashamed to do it.

(I could be wrong on this, of course, but I did read it somewhere).

Either way, I respect anyone, man or woman, who has the focus and patience to knit anything. That potholder I made was probably 7 by 7 inches and took me well over an hour. Seriously. lol.

It did turn out good though and I was proud of it. Even a master knitter at a local craft shop complimented it when I showed it to her. There were a couple flaws here and there but it was mostly uniformly properly knit.
 

Lynn

Longing for Home
Linda, I'm glad you had a grandmother who knitted and that you now have memories of those precious hours when the two of you were working with yarn together. Wish I could say that. Instead, I learned the basics of knitting from another young woman when I was in college. I sort of quit for about 40 years, then picked it back up after reading How to Knit books. It all came back to me, just as though my friend Patty was teaching me all over again. It's a simple craft, but somewhat tedious, and as Jonathan said, very time consuming. As the weather turns colder in a few weeks, I may decide to get out my knitting once again, as it seems more fitting for wintry weather somehow.
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
Very interesting about sailors knitting! I agree. Knitting is SLOWWWW. Or I'm slow at it.

I recently read a book on sweater knitting patterns and techniques from long ago. The knitters would knit these beautiful cable patterns on the top of the arms and torso sections then switch to plain stockinette for the rest. The reasoning was the stockinette was easier to repair in the sections most likely to need repair.

Here is a link to a very warm and easy hat put out by a charity that knits things for sailors. I've made one for Operation Christmas Child and it was a lot of fun.

http://seamenschurch.org/sites/default/files/sci-1898-hat-kristine-byrnes-web-w-schematic.pdf
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
Very interesting about sailors knitting! I agree. Knitting is SLOWWWW. Or I'm slow at it.

I recently read a book on sweater knitting patterns and techniques from long ago. The knitters would knit these beautiful cable patterns on the top of the arms and torso sections then switch to plain stockinette for the rest. The reasoning was the stockinette was easier to repair in the sections most likely to need repair.

Here is a link to a very warm and easy hat put out by a charity that knits things for sailors. I've made one for Operation Christmas Child and it was a lot of fun.

http://seamenschurch.org/sites/default/files/sci-1898-hat-kristine-byrnes-web-w-schematic.pdf
Cool link! Thanks! I wouldn't even attempt to make that though, lol. Meandering pot-holders with no plans will be my knitting lot in life. :p But still cool link. Thanks.
 

Work4Peanuts

I like being just a Well-Known Member
On a related note, about not being too ashamed to be a guy who knits, I once read that knitting was actually developed by sailors (men) to kill time when their other duties were not needed to turn yarn into warm clothes to protect them from the cold. If true, then knitting was invented by men, so no man should be ashamed to do it.

(I could be wrong on this, of course, but I did read it somewhere).
Continuing on the "I read it somewhere, but could be wrong" idea, I think there actually was a knitter's guild and women weren't allowed in. Machine knitting broke that up though.
 

Momma D

Well-Known Member
I never learned how to knit, but crocheted for hours on end, years on end! I loved it, but had no choice but to give it up when my doctor told me the arthritis in several of my fingers was caused from all those hours making so many wonderful things, mostly gifts!
What a potentially heartbreaking day when my oldest granddaughter asked me to teach her to crochet. :(
I decided there was no way I could say no to her, and thank God she was a quick learner...with a good teacher :sneaky...because those same few fingers had me in a world of hurt!
It was a painful price to pay, but such a blessing to her!! And to me as well!

The rest of the girls, I taught to sew :tunez
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
Momma D, I’m so sorry to hear that! My mom has arthritis in her fingers and is hoping to continue crocheting. She’s currently trying to learn to use an ergonomic hook.
 

Judy4Jesus

God is GOOD!
Yes...
Here's a picture of what they look like:

They are all made with single crochet and a "G" or "H" crochet hook.

Here's the link to the pattern....it's really easy

http://yayforyarn.com/free-double-thick-potholder-crochet-pattern/

They make great Christmas gifts. Crocheting with cotton yarn is a one of my favorite things to do . I used to make doilies with cotton thread #10 and a #7 or #8 steel crochet hook, but my vision isn't what it used to be, so I stopped doing that.
These are THE BEST!! I dont knit (my hobby is counted cross stitching), so when I accidentally burnt my pot holders I got years ago just like these (my FAVORITE) on the hot stovetop burner, I put a family wide text calling all crafters...I need new...a couple days later I was blessed in the mail! These really are great and can be thrown in the washer and dryer. Just dont throw them on your still hot stove top! Yikes! Ha
 
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