Does anyone knit?

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
For decades I tried and failed to learn, but this August I decided I was going to learn even if I had to take lessons. And I did. And I LOVE it. I've made some scarves, a pillow cover, and mittens. But I could literally sit and knit big squares of stockinette or garter with no goal in mind and still love it. I turn on my true crime shows each night and start knitting. I'm thinking of trying those square needles due to some arthritis in my hands. Naturally I'd wait till I'm OLD to learn lol.
 

Hsmommy

Well-Known Member
My daughter knits. I taught her the basics when she was about 10. She's 22 now. She, like you, can sit in front of the TV & knit for hours. She buys wool at the 2nd hand shops & makes blankets that she donates to the locals women's shelters & children's hospital. The largest she has made is to fit a queen bed & her smallest go to preemies.

Hsmommy
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
Wow I'm impressed! I've considered a throw but was overwhelmed, although it's like anything else and made one stitch at a time. I've begun to make scarves to donate to the local animal rescue thrift store.
 

georgeO

Well-Known Member
And to add another interesting bit of information to my grandmother in law is that she was a Cajun from south Louisiana that was raised as a sharecropper daughter and married a sharecropper and that's the way of life for them until their death. It was a hard life compared to us but it was the life that they new and adapted to. God bless them.
 

georgeO

Well-Known Member
I also remember when my grandmother in laws son came home from a tour from Vietnam. He bought her a air conditioner window unit for her house. She never used it because it cost to much on her
electric bill. The only heat that she had was a wood burning stove. I also remember that whenever she didn't want the younger generation to know her conversation with her children, she would talk in French. But she always participated in the town quilting.
 
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caedmon

Well-Known Member
I knit. And then I swear off it and give away my wool stash. And then I find I desperately need something that doesn’t exist, like last week when I needed an ear-warming flap for the back of my favourite hat. And then I buy ONE ball of wool and knit it, but there’s enough left over for mittens, and you know that store bought mitts never have long enough wrists to keep you warm. So I finished them a couple of days ago. Now my MOTHER wants a hat. It’s like a perpetual addiction that cannot be completely escaped.

It would probably help if I gave away my Addi Turbo needle kit, but I’d rather part with a kidney. A junkie has to draw the line somewhere.
 

georgeO

Well-Known Member
Knitting is an art or skill that may not seem necessary right now but it could become a very valuable thing in the future. Never know. Keep those balls of wool on hand. And for you that are starting out to knitting, please keep practicing and practicing. You will slowly get better and better. I think its a great art. My grandmother ( not my grandmother in law ) was born in the year 1900. She never learned to drive a car. She was born before cars were available , before airplanes, before indoor plumbing, before electricity in homes and before television and telephones down here in the deep south of mississippi. But she did knit. And I still have some of her handiwork. She died in 1965 but her memories live on.
 

caedmon

Well-Known Member
Yeah. Knitting's fun and useful. I have to stay off it because it can be an utter time-suck for me, worse than TV. But for anybody trying to learn, I got lots of help from on-line tutorials. “How to do the long-tailed cast-on” or, “how to increase/decrease when knitting”. Like cookbooks, the internet is wonderful help for self-taught knitters. So is anybody working on anything special? I’m still looking for that bright white alpaca or angora or something for Mom's hat. Maybe the really good knitting store will be open tomorrow. Michael’s is full of expensive, overpriced crap acrylic, unfortunately. I want expensive, overpriced good wool. On sale (yeah right).

What do you bet I’ll have Addi Turbo needles in Heaven, too, and still be too busy to use them?
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
Caedmon,
Fun isn't it?!! I'm currently working on learning to make hats on double pointed needles. I'll post a pic later. I have some nice wool and cotton mix I got from Jimmy Bean's Wool along with a bunch of the square Kollage needles too (love how they feel). I've never tried the Turbos but have heard great things about them on Ravelry.

I'm making these hats for Operation Christmas Child shoeboxes. As I'm so hot-natured I quickly discovered I'll be knitting for charity a lot since I have very little need of more warm things. And knitting is addictive for me. I definitely don't want to stop lol. So I'll turn on my recorded Datelines or 48 Hours and away I go clacking needles all evening.
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
That is good to know...I can crochet but I always wanted to learn how to knit. I think I will try tutorials when I get a chance...What size needles should I start with?

Kerbluey here. :) I'd start with 8-10 circulars. Those are the ones with a cable attaching two needles. Walmart, Hob Lob, Michaels--- you can find them anywhere. I find those sizes to be comfortable and circulars are easier than non-circs because the needles are shorter. The wooden needles are also easier to use as a beginner since they grip the yarn better, but I quickly moved to slick metal needles. Knitting has a steep learning curve, but I find it more simple than crochet now that I've got the hang of it.

I'm pretty sure I couldn't have learned without website and YouTube tutorials.
 

Lily

Looking Up
I was thinking of asking if anyone quilts and saw this thread. There are some quilting posts here so I will go ahead and share my thoughts.

I love to quilt. I love everything about it. I've spent hours learning about old quilts and hours looking at new quilts. I have a large stack of quilting magazines and have about six how-to books, but I've had to quit getting more due to space. I am amazed at the craftsmanship. I wish I had started when I was a young girl but only started in my forties. I am self taught and wish I had had a mentor to guide me.

I've made several quilts of different sizes. I've never had a quilt frame so it is very difficult to quilt on my lap but that's how I've worked it. I do wall quilts and have many in my home. I'm really not all that good, not compared to what others have done. I've seen many masterpieces: (These are NOT my quilts)



The amount of work that goes into these is astounding. I've never done anything like these but wish I could.

I live in a tiny apartment and having a keen interest in quilting is about the last hobby I should have. Quilts take a huge amount of space, but I still do it even when I end up strewing fabric and notions throughout the whole place. It can be a very expensive hobby, but I work mostly with scraps and have acquired fabric at thrift shops and have found other ways to be thrifty.

I wish I could go to a retreat of some kind for a long time and be around accomplished quilters and learn from them. Whenever I want to escape I love looking at quilts. I study them and never cease to be amazed at the talent and imagination of these artists. There are a few highly accomplished men quilters and it's a treat to see their work too.

My latest project was blocks of stamped embroidery of some cute birds that I worked and put into a quilted curtain for my kitchen cupboard that has no door. (I love embroidery too, I did begin doing that as a very young girl) I hardly ever follow a pattern when I quilt (I make my own) and really enjoy applique the most.

Just this week I broke down and signed up with Pinterest just so I could look at the wonderful quilts there and save the ideas for myself. I've only been to two quilt shows but I would travel across the states to go to any if it were possible.

If I knew how to insert my pictures from my file I would post a little of my work.

No one has mentioned from this forum being a quilter in the many years I've been here so I'm doubting that anyone shares my interest, but I hope so.

I hope also that there's a quilt shop in heaven. It doesn't seem like the sort of thing that would be needed there though.

Thanks for letting me vent, I just had to tell someone even at the risk of boring everyone to death.
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
Lily, those quilts are beautiful. While I don't quilt my aunt does, so I grew up around it and appreciate the work involved to create such beautiful items! Have you ever been to the quilt museum in Paducah, Kentucky? I highly recommend it if you ever get the chance. As far as your hobby, maybe consider giving to charity? I realized right away I'd have to knit for charity otherwise I'd end up with stacks of knitted things stored in drawers doing nobody any good.
 

Lily

Looking Up
Lily, those quilts are beautiful. While I don't quilt my aunt does, so I grew up around it and appreciate the work involved to create such beautiful items! Have you ever been to the quilt museum in Paducah, Kentucky? I highly recommend it if you ever get the chance. As far as your hobby, maybe consider giving to charity? I realized right away I'd have to knit for charity otherwise I'd end up with stacks of knitted things stored in drawers doing nobody any good.
I appreciate your responding! To answer your questions, first, I knew of Paducah, Kentucky because my quilting magazines advertise for quilt show awards. I only recently discovered that there is a museum also. (Not sure if the two are related) It's realistically unlikely that I'll ever be able to visit, but would in a heartbeat if possible.

For some inexplicable reason I hadn't thought of searching the internet to find what help there is available. After signing up for Pinterest, it opened up a whole world that I didn't know existed. There are hundreds, if not thousands of free YouTube tutorials on everything sewing.

I was taught to sew by my mother in the 60's when later that awful polyester first came out. I learned to sew on a mechanical sewing machine and still have my Kenmore from the mid 70's. I got so far behind in the new fabrics and such that I was paralyzed in time past. YouTube has been an amazing asset. I recently "began again" with smaller projects and have made many items. Sooooo, I can only use so many quilted tote bags so I have been considering charity after I get a large pile of items made.

I actually bought a new Brother computer sewing machine at a fantastic price almost two years ago. I managed to wind a bobbin and found it all overwhelming, that I put the whole thing back in the box and there it sits. I may try again after I relearn to sew anew. As for the quilting, we'll see, it's still very difficult without a large space to work in.

My home has fabric and notions everywhere, I can't seem to not make a mess of it. I envy your knitting, so compact and sensible.

I pratted on and on again, so sorry.... I had meant to make a short answer but got carried away.
 
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Lynn

Well-Known Member
Lily, when I bought a new sewing machine a few years ago, the lady in the sewing machine department gave me a few lessons. Even if it's been two years since you bought your machine, the store will likely honor your purchase and give you lessons on how to use it.
 

Kerbluey

Well-Known Member
I appreciate your responding! To answer your questions, first, I knew of Paducah, Kentucky because my quilting magazines advertise for quilt show awards. I only recently discovered that there is a museum also. (Not sure if the two are related) It's realistically unlikely that I'll ever be able to visit, but would in a heartbeat if possible.

For some inexplicable reason I hadn't thought of searching the internet to find what help there is available. After signing up for Pinterest, it opened up a whole world that I didn't know existed. There are hundreds, if not thousands of free YouTube tutorials on everything sewing.

I was taught to sew by my mother in the 60's when later that awful polyester first came out. I learned to sew on a mechanical sewing machine and still have my Kenmore from the mid 70's. I got so far behind in the new fabrics and such that I was paralyzed in time past. YouTube has been an amazing asset. I recently "began again" with smaller projects and have made many items. Sooooo, I can only use so many quilted tote bags so I have been considering charity after I get a large pile of items made.

I actually bought a new Brother computer sewing machine at a fantastic price almost two years ago. I managed to wind a bobbin and found it all overwhelming, that I put the whole thing back in the box and there it sits. I may try again after I relearn to sew anew. As for the quilting, we'll see, it's still very difficult without a large space to work in.

My home has fabric and notions everywhere, I can't seem to not make a mess of it. I envy your knitting, so compact and sensible.

I pratted on and on again, so sorry.... I had meant to make a short answer but got carried away.


Knitting compact and sensible?!! I kid you not, every day I wonder how I can manage to mess half the house up with it. And today I bought more yarn and needles! They were on clearance though. :D

I agree about Pinterest and YouTube. I don't think I could've figured out knitting without them.

Please never apologize about going on about crafts. :D
 
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