Do you use a telescope?

InsuranceGuy

Well-Known Member
I am considering buying one. Since I am up at night anyway, it may keep me busy. Twenty two(ish) years ago, I had one, but ot was stolen off my patio in the apartment I lived in at the time.

I want something to where I can see the moon very close, but also jist search around space. Most of the ones I have reviewed make the Moon a bit larger, but you cannot really see anything outside of light. I would like to see the cracks and deep trenches, bit have no clue what type of telescope I would need for the clarity I want..... A beginners telescope is out as they cannot see the moon well enough to make much sense of it.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
Read the Sky and Telescope buying guides first

https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-equipment/telescope-buying-guide/
https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-equipment/telescope-eyepiece-guide/
https://skyandtelescope.org/observing/skyandtelescope-coms-scope-calculator/
Sky and Telescope page with links to various guides https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-equipment/

Then look at

https://www.space.com/7591-telescope-buying-guide-part-1.html (note 2009 date)


Then look at some other places

The Planets https://theplanets.org/best-telescopes-buying-guide/
Spae.com https://www.space.com/15693-telescopes-beginners-telescope-reviews-buying-guide.html
Orion (manufacturer) buying guides https://www.telescope.com/Buying-Guides/com/440.uts
Celestron (manufacturer) buying guide https://www.celestron.com/collections/telescope-buyers-guide

There are a bunch of different manufacturers, some of which are excellent. Don't buy a big bix/department store telescope.
Consider secod hand equipment from a reputable place that inspects, refurbishes, guarantees . . .

Happy star (and other object) gazing and getting lost in God's glorious creation :smile
 

InsuranceGuy

Well-Known Member
Read the Sky and Telescope buying guides first

https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-equipment/telescope-buying-guide/
https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-equipment/telescope-eyepiece-guide/
https://skyandtelescope.org/observing/skyandtelescope-coms-scope-calculator/
Sky and Telescope page with links to various guides https://skyandtelescope.org/astronomy-equipment/

Then look at

https://www.space.com/7591-telescope-buying-guide-part-1.html (note 2009 date)


Then look at some other places

The Planets https://theplanets.org/best-telescopes-buying-guide/
Spae.com https://www.space.com/15693-telescopes-beginners-telescope-reviews-buying-guide.html
Orion (manufacturer) buying guides https://www.telescope.com/Buying-Guides/com/440.uts
Celestron (manufacturer) buying guide https://www.celestron.com/collections/telescope-buyers-guide

There are a bunch of different manufacturers, some of which are excellent. Don't buy a big bix/department store telescope.
Consider secod hand equipment from a reputable place that inspects, refurbishes, guarantees . . .

Happy star (and other object) gazing and getting lost in God's glorious creation :smile
Thank you. I'll read through these tomorrow. :)
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
I have always wanted a high-powered telescope. There are many options. But what most of the literature I read basically said was. no matter what you buy, "lower your expectations."

Correct me if I am wrong people, but from what I understand, you can get very good views of the moon's craters or some other astronomical entities, but what you won't see is the stuff of pictures in magazines. PLEASE CORRECT ME IF I AM WRONG.

However, I saw one photo taken from a consumer level telescope (I am guessing under $1000) where you could see Saturn WITH it's rings around it. Not in high detail, but it was there. And I think that is the great pleasure in owning such a telescope. To personally verify what you knew all along from learning astronomy.

To actually SEE Saturn's rings, even if they lack any real detail whatsoever (think of a small orb surrounded by a blurry ring).

Finally, I will repeat again, this is JUST WHAT I HAVE READ. It is not based on experience.

If you do go forward, please let us know how it works out.
 

Ghoti Ichthus

Pray so they do not serve alone. Ephesians 6:10-20
You're very welcome. It's been a long time since I was in the market for a telescope, so I don't feel comfortable recommending anything specific. However, the more I looked back then, the more I realized I needed to learn a lot more before I could start looking :rolleyes

You might want to contact a local astronomy club. You might be able to go out with them one night and try some different telescopes to get an idea about what you like/dislike.

If you wear glasses, especially if you have astigmatism, consider getting a prescription lens for the telescope eyepiece, as well as the regular one (or a separate corrective eyepiece altogether)
https://skyandtelescope.org/astrono...ers/should-i-wear-eyeglasses-while-observing/
 

Eric Nicholas

Well-Known Member
Excellent idea not only about the club (I am a HAM radio guy, and our local club is always more then eager to help out. I assume it is the same with an astronomical club) but also about taking into consideration glasses/your correction.

Take care.

I've been wanting to get into HAM for some time. I mess around here : http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901 just to see what I can listen to. I've recorded some interesting things there.
 

Jonathan

Well-Known Member
I very well may take you up on that. But for now, what license class are you and what is the start up cost to get into it and have some fun? What's your set up like?
I am a General Class Operator. It's basically what most people in Ham radio go for unless they want to get really serious and go for "Amateur Extra." The key thing about having a General license (as opposed to a technician) is that you can work the HF waves and not just the VHF/UHF.

For VHF I use at my QTH (slang for home/base) I have a Kenwood 65 watt connected to a Diamond 4.5 ft vertical in my attic. Works great. I can sometimes hit the Richmond repeater, which is 60+ miles away. (VHF/UHF is mostly line of site, so it probably has more to do with their tower height).

Locally, I can hit our local repeater with a cheap Baofang handheld.

In terms of HF, I have an ICOM 7300 (100 watt) connected to a 20M Half Dipole in my attic. Unfortunately, results are mixed. I've gotten as far as Vancouver with it, but it isn't all I desire.

Hope that helps.

OH, also, you mentioned start up costs. I'd have to know your location, but I don't want you to disclose that. Instead, research how near you are to an amateur radio repeater. If you are within, say 10 miles or so, you can get started with $35 for the inexpensive radio I mentioned above and whatever the local ARRL associated radio club charges for the exam fee.
 
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Eric Nicholas

Well-Known Member
I am a General Class Operator. It's basically what most people in Ham radio go for unless they want to get really serious and go for "Amateur Extra." The key thing about having a General license (as opposed to a technician) is that you can work the HF waves and not just the VHF/UHF.

For VHF I use at my QTH (slang for home/base) I have a Kenwood 65 watt connected to a Diamond 4.5 ft vertical in my attic. Works great. I can sometimes hit the Richmond repeater, which is 60+ miles away. (VHF/UHF is mostly line of site, so it probably has more to do with their tower height).

Locally, I can hit are local repeater with a cheap Baofang handheld.

In terms of HF, I have an ICOM 7300 (100 watt) connected to a 20M Half Dipole in my attic. Unfortunately, results are mixed. I've gotten as far as Vancouver with it, but it isn't all I desire.

Hope that helps.

OH, also, you mentioned start up costs. I'd have to know your location, but I don't want you to disclose that. Instead, research how near you are to an amateur radio repeater. If you are within, say 10 miles or so, you can get started with $35 for the inexpensive radio I mentioned above and whatever the local ARRL associated radio club charges for the exam fee.

Thanks a lot, Jonathan. I'll study up on these terms and devices and go from there. But I am very interested in it. Thanks!
 

Dave

Well-Known Member
I have always wanted a high-powered telescope. There are many options. But what most of the literature I read basically said was. no matter what you buy, "lower your expectations."

Correct me if I am wrong people, but from what I understand, you can get very good views of the moon's craters or some other astronomical entities, but what you won't see is the stuff of pictures in magazines. PLEASE CORRECT ME IF I AM WRONG.

However, I saw one photo taken from a consumer level telescope (I am guessing under $1000) where you could see Saturn WITH it's rings around it. Not in high detail, but it was there. And I think that is the great pleasure in owning such a telescope. To personally verify what you knew all along from learning astronomy.

To actually SEE Saturn's rings, even if they lack any real detail whatsoever (think of a small orb surrounded by a blurry ring).

Finally, I will repeat again, this is JUST WHAT I HAVE READ. It is not based on experience.

If you do go forward, please let us know how it works out.

I was just watching a Youtube video of someone taking pictures with their telescope and you could see Saturn with its rings and great details of the Moon. The guy showed what kind of telescope he was using and the mount,


Telescope: http://amzn.to/2AgfxUi
Mount: http://amzn.to/2i7ktpL

pretty expensive stuff.
 

PhilR

Well-Known Member
I am considering buying one. Since I am up at night anyway, it may keep me busy. Twenty two(ish) years ago, I had one, but ot was stolen off my patio in the apartment I lived in at the time.

I want something to where I can see the moon very close, but also jist search around space. Most of the ones I have reviewed make the Moon a bit larger, but you cannot really see anything outside of light. I would like to see the cracks and deep trenches, bit have no clue what type of telescope I would need for the clarity I want..... A beginners telescope is out as they cannot see the moon well enough to make much sense of it.
I have been using telescopes and doing amateur astronomy since the 1980's and this has been my number one hobby. I am not sure of your interest whether just casual or very serious. As far as a good telescope advise I would suggest you check out the Cloudy Nights Forums astronomy website. They will give you some very good info on what you need in a telescope, and what telescopes to stay away from, especially these cheep WalMart, or department store type telescopes.
I have mostly always been observing what are called deep sky objects, which are open star clusters, globular star clusters, nebulas, and galaxies.. I also do some observing on Planets, Moon, comets. There are hundreds of deep sky objects-especially galaxies that can be seen seen with just a modest size portable telescope like a 6 inch to 10 inch diameter mirror reflector telescope. The size (diameter) and quality of the scopes mirror or lens is much more important than magnification of the telescope.
Where you observe from is most important as to what you can see. If you plan to observe from the city or suburbs you will be limited as to what you can see, whereas if you observe away from street lights and light pollution like out in the country or rural areas then number of objects you can see, especially deep sky objects, will increase exponentially and be much more easily seen through your telescope.
I personally do all my observing with my telescope from rural locations. I will drive to a lake campground a couple of times a month and spend the night observing with either my 10 in reflector scope or 12.5 inch reflector and either camp out there, or have a motel room in the area, or just drive home. This hobby is a form of hunting and exploration, and like game hunting or fishing except you don't need a license and it's always open season.
Along with Cloudy Nights Forums, I would also suggest checking on-line for any local astronomy clubs in your area. My astronomy club has its own rural dark sky site that members, like me, can use any time.. Cloudy Nights site and forums as well as an astronomy club can be a great source of information and friendship.

And I do not buy into the evolution theory and big bang theory. I believe the Bible literally and I don't think we have all the answers to how exactly things came about in the universe. Here is what I say: God existed before Genesis 1:1, so were there angels with Him before Genesis 1:1? And what all could have happened before Genesis 1:1, and how long before Gen 1:1 was it??
If you want theories look to science, but if you want truth look to the Holy Bible.

Clear skies and God bless
 
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