Couldn’t wait to announce—-

Glorydaz

Member
And SCOTUS is unlikely to go against precedent, but, who knows? The Nazis did all kinds of ghoulish "medical" experiments on their own citizens and the Nuremberg Trials set their own precedent. The Nuremberg Code that came out of those trials states specifically against forcing anyone to participate in a medical experiment. The U.S. is a signatory, as are most Western nations.
I don't think they're into following any rules anymore.
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
I'm not sure the Supreme Court has the authority to contradict the Fascists in charge anymore. If the court wouldn't act on massive voter fraud why would they act on anything contrary to the left. Never underestimate the left's power.
This is an example of what Paul means here

while evildoers and impostors will go from bad to worse, deceiving and being deceived.
2 Timothy 3:13

Unless the courts have believers on the bench they will only go along with the decievers and deceived.
 

jayhawkbasketball

Well-Known Member
John Roberts will side with the liberals like he always does, which means they’ll only have to flip one of the conservative justices to get a 5-4 majority to keep the mandate in place. I’m guessing Amy Coney Barrett will be their target. The vote is scheduled for a Friday…which doesn’t bode well for us. It’s like scheduling someone’s termination at work, you always do it on a Friday to ease the burden on everyone. Not to mention the court’s recent unwillingness to hear cases for federal healthcare workers regarding vaccine mandates.

I think it’s lining up to be a 6-3 or 5-4 vote in favor of keeping the mandate. And why not? Doing that opens the door for the Executive branch to be able to do whatever they want…which is where all of this has been headed / is headed anyway.

We’ll see. I’m not holding my breath, but I am praying.
 

GEOINTAnalyst

Well-Known Member
These decisions pertained to smallpox, which killed hundreds of millions of people and had a 30 percent fatality rate. Smallpox was easily communicable to all ages including infants. It took centuries to develop a vaccine and eradicate.
Covid has a .5 percent mortality rate. Different times, different circumstances.
Yes but it was vaccinations that completely eradicate the disease which was finally done in 1977 it took 181 years since Edward Jenner created the first vaccine in 1796
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Yes but it was vaccinations that completely eradicate the disease which was finally done in 1977 it took 181 years since Edward Jenner created the first vaccine in 1796
Actually, that is untrue. Just one example: Polio was almost completely gone by the time the first polio vaccine (the Salk vaccine) was administered. Natural herd immunity is always a superior protection for a population (at least when it comes to viruses). Vaccines tend to be "leaky" and force mutations in the genome of the virus. There are now almost 1,000 mutations of the virus that causes Covid infection. Fortunately, Omicron seems to be displacing other variations of the virus and it tends to be quite mild. I pray that it will result in a robust herd immunity to end this scourge.

What is frightening is that Merck Pharmaceuticals had small pox in their freezer at their research facilities--wasn't locked up or anything. NO ONE is supposed to have access except very secure locations.
 
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GEOINTAnalyst

Well-Known Member
Actually, that is untrue. Just one example: Polio was almost completely gone by the time the first polio vaccine (the Salk vaccine) was administered. Natural herd immunity is always a superior protection for a population (at least when it comes to viruses). Vaccines tend to be "leaky" and force mutations in the genome of the virus. There are now almost 1,000 mutations of the virus that causes Covid infection. Fortunately, Omicron seems to be displacing other variations of the virus and it tends to be quite mild. I pray that it will result in a robust herd immunity to end this scourge.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1200696/
https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/smallpox-vaccines
https://www.sciencemuseum.org.uk/objects-and-stories/medicine/smallpox-and-story-vaccination
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
I'm not denying that the vaccine for small pox was a success story but, it is overly broad to say that the vaccine industry is particularly useful, as any immunologist will tell you that it has a great many problems attendant to it. Food security, good nutrition and improved hygiene is at least as useful in the battle against contagions.
 
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