Could Melchizedek Be One of the Two Witnesses During the Tribulation

ZAGS

Member
As I was looking over the comments and the link I discovered that Melchizedek is mentioned three times in the Bible. Very interesting and exciting as numerology in the Bible is never random. The number three represents above all the Holy Trinity.
Number 3 in the Bible represents the Holy Trinity of God, which is the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. It also represents Divine Perfection, as many things in the world are made up of three parts, which include time, with the past, present, and future; space, which consists of height, width, and depth; and lastly, matter, which consists of solid, liquid, and gas.

Other forms of divine perfection include mankind, having a mind, body, and spirit; the three abilities of mankind being thought, words, and action; the three places men dwell, which are heaven, earth, and hell; and the three gifts of grace, which are faith, hope, and love, among many other mentions in the Bible that exist in 3’s.
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
I am, too. Melchizedek in Hebrew is Melech Tzedek ... which literally means King of Righteousness. According to Scripture, Melchizedek was the "King of Salem", which in the original Hebrew is Melech Shalom. Melech Shalom literally means King of Peace. There is only ONE person I know in Scripture who combines the offices of both priest and king. His name is Jesus. Jesus is also the only King of Righteousness I know and the only King of Peace. Hence why I preach and teach he was a Christophany.
I'm on the theophany train, personally, but, some scholars, for whatever reason have a prejudice against that position. When I was in seminary, I asked my Old Testament prof about it. He told me that Melchizedek "absolutely was not a theophany". He apparently based it on his opinion that Melchizedek was presented as a mortal in the Old Testament. :noidea2
 

mattfivefour

Administrator
Staff member
I'm on the theophany train, personally, but, some scholars, for whatever reason have a prejudice against that position. When I was in seminary, I asked my Old Testament prof about it. He told me that Melchizedek "absolutely was not a theophany". He apparently based it on his opinion that Melchizedek was presented as a mortal in the Old Testament. :noidea2
Yuuuuup. That's why I sometimes slip up and refer to seminary as cemetery. :lol
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
Yuuuuup. That's why I sometimes slip up and refer to seminary as cemetery. :lol
Now THAT's the truth! I went to a "conservative" cemet...I mean seminary and was shocked by the level of Bible-ignorance among the seminarians. But they knew Walter Kaiser, inside-out. Fifteen-syllable German words are just not impressive to me. :rolleyes::blahblah
 
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Blue Sky

Well-Known Member
I don't see anything in Scripture that concretely supports the idea that Melchizedek was a theophany. I'm not entirely against the idea, but it's a supposition mostly based on the absence of information (read: genealogy) rather than the presence of information.

Based on the miracles that the two witnesses accomplish, I could see them being Moses / Elijah. They both already made N.T. appearances on the Mt. of Transfiguration, Elijah called fire down from heaven 3 times and withheld rain, Moses turned water to blood. On the other hand, nothing in Scripture (to my knowledge) says that the two witnesses have to be "old" people, they could theoretically be people that are born before the 70th week, and then God equips them for their purpose during.
 

Batman

Well-Known Member
I agree. I think Melchizedek was a real person and is a type of the coming King of Kings and Lord of Lords. If he is a real person it will be something to finally see him in the great beyond.
 

Abed_nego2

Well-Known Member
I would suggest that the two strong probabilities that the two witnesses are Moses and Elijah, but not provable. But we can e certain about several things:

1. Moses and Elijah are alive and very well in God's presence (Matthew 17:1-3).

2. Just as God had true prophets throughout history to confront false prophets, He will empower two very capable witnesses to contradict the "False Prophet" of Revelation 13:11-16.

3. After they are "killed" they are resurrected and caught up, and once again are alive and well with God!

Revelation 11 reminds us not to "fear them that kill the body, but rather to fear Him who has power over the body and the soul" (Matthew 10:28). As He did with the 5th seal martyrs (Revelation 6:9-11), God takes these witnesses into heaven where they are alive and well for all eternity. Thus, we too need to be a faithful witness for God.
 
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