Coronavirus update

Narrow Path

Well-Known Member
But if utilities in China are unaffected as bad as it is there, why would it here? I still get the sense that people are determined to panic.
Because we don’t know how this all ends yet in China. This is only a few months old. The early patterns we first saw there are playing out in other countries now to some degree. If China were to lose utility services in a couple months, stands to reason that could also happen elsewhere. It’s not panic, it’s preparedness. Losing utilities isn’t my biggest concern with this virus, but it’s wise to cover your bases.
 

Batfan7

Well-Known Member
If you want to do minimal disaster preparedness (not just for Corona virus), a case of bottled water is a good idea, but I agree that this particular pandemic probably won't effect general utilities, so don't go all-out for batteries, solar panels, water filtration, etc.

However, stocking up on daily necessities that might not be on the grocery shelves would be smart. Oatmeal, sugar, coffee, dry noodles & rice, toilet paper, diapers... If you have a freezer with space, get a bunch of meat or frozen pizzas or whatever. Just pick your top ten meals (including lunch, breakfast, and snacks) that don't include fresh produce and get enough to eat those for a couple of weeks. If you love the food, you probably won't let it go bad and then if you don't want to go grocery shopping (or can't), then you're set!
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
Reporting from FOXNEWS, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Tuesday warned that it expects the novel coronavirus to begin spreading in the U.S. at the community level, and that “disruption to everyday life might be severe.”
Dr. Nancy Messonnier, the agency’s director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said in a press briefing on Tuesday that the time for Americans to begin preparing for a potential outbreak of the virus is now, although officials believe the immediate threat to the public remains low.

“Ultimately, we expect we will see community spread in this country,” Messonnier said. “It’s not a question of if, but when, and how many people in this country will have severe illness.”
Citing the recent uptick in cases with countries with confirmed illnesses, Messonnier said health officials recognize that once the virus hits, it moves “quite rapidly.”

“As more and more countries experience community spread, successful containment at our borders becomes harder and harder,” she said.

The U.S. currently has 14 confirmed cases of the virus in people who have traveled to China or been in close contact with someone who has. An additional 39 residents were infected with the virus while onboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan, but last week the health agency said those cases would be counted separately from the national tally.
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
Because we don’t know how this all ends yet in China. This is only a few months old. The early patterns we first saw there are playing out in other countries now to some degree. If China were to lose utility services in a couple months, stands to reason that could also happen elsewhere. It’s not panic, it’s preparedness. Losing utilities isn’t my biggest concern with this virus, but it’s wise to cover your bases.
you know, in the US at times we just take so much for granted because compared to many countries our lives are so at ease and without worry about anything major happening here. i think there are a lot of people who see this situation as just an everyday thing, like colds and flus and it will just go away. But what if it doesnt? As theyve said from the beginning, there is a lot they dont know about this virus. If it is true that it is a "lab created" virus, then it isnt just like an every day virus, or even like other corona viruses. They have yet to kow the duration of the infection, how to contain it, how to treat it. There is so much they are trying to figure out and could tak up to a year or two to even find a vaccine. What is concerning is that they dont even know for sure how it spreads from the outbreaks that have occurred in countries that have had no connection to China. Right now this situation needs much prayer and just do what we can to prepare in case it gets out of control in the US too.
 
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athenasius

Well-Known Member
I'd say utilities general preparedness in North America is pretty good except for California. There are a lot of automated procedures and staff can move around off the routine maintenance to help out. California has had trouble in the past with routine maintenance procedures but even so, they should be able to flex. Dh is retired from working at BC Hydro our local utility.
So I spoke with my daughter tonight and her apartment is on the same street as the hospital in Florence. She said they have set up tents outside and heard someone say ” quarantine.” She is getting fairly nervous and I’m trying to keep her calm. I spoke with the school today and they are waiting to see what International SOS says. This is an organization that tracks the students and the status of health, environment, travel, etc...If she were to be evacuated they would arrange travel, doctors, etc...Really all it takes is for one case and Florence and they could be in lock down....honestly I could hear that is the news tomorrow morning at the rate we are going. I am sending her masks and some nonperishables in the mail tomorrow. All that being said; what do you suggest I send her? Clorox wipes, sanitizer with alcohol? Thanks Athenasius!
NCannie, you've gotten good suggestions and I agree, Clorox wipes, Hand Sanitizer gel and masks especially. Think about what her needs are to fly home, and those would be the best but hopefully she'll be on her way home soon. Smaller sizes of gel sanitizer to be handy on the plane. Also I understand the situation is fluid, but she needs to be ready to go -- if she can do it herself, getting out before airlines start evacuations out of Italy might be best.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
Reporting from FOXNEWS, The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on Tuesday warned that it expects the novel coronavirus to begin spreading in the U.S. at the community level, and that “disruption to everyday life might be severe.”
Dr. Nancy Messonnier, the agency’s director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said in a press briefing on Tuesday that the time for Americans to begin preparing for a potential outbreak of the virus is now, although officials believe the immediate threat to the public remains low.

“Ultimately, we expect we will see community spread in this country,” Messonnier said. “It’s not a question of if, but when, and how many people in this country will have severe illness.”
Citing the recent uptick in cases with countries with confirmed illnesses, Messonnier said health officials recognize that once the virus hits, it moves “quite rapidly.”

“As more and more countries experience community spread, successful containment at our borders becomes harder and harder,” she said.

The U.S. currently has 14 confirmed cases of the virus in people who have traveled to China or been in close contact with someone who has. An additional 39 residents were infected with the virus while onboard the Diamond Princess cruise ship in Japan, but last week the health agency said those cases would be counted separately from the national tally.
We are sort of DONE with the quarantine now, it's been breached so often and so badly that this stage of a disease outbreak is just watch and see what happens as it starts to increase. At some point, it will burn out. Meanwhile this stage is all about remembering to protect yourself thru hygiene and reasonable preparations depending on your own situation.

I'd suggest anyone planning to use gloves, go over and look at @Kem post (I'll try to link it here) on how to take them off safely without contaminating yourself.

#39 on page 2 here: https://www.raptureforums.com/forum...s-likely-to-be-pretty-dangerous.156545/page-2

HERES HER POST:
I've seen that too and it kind of makes one wonder where their brain is. Anyway here is a word for those who don't know how to properly remove gloves. With your non dominate hand, take thumb and forefinger and grab the very top of the wrist portion of the other glove, pull the glove inside out as you pull it down and off. Now, while touching only the inside of the glove, place it in the palm of the hand still wearing a glove. Very carefully take forefinger and thumb of the other hand to grab the top portion of the other glove on the non dominate hand carefully pulling it down over the palm of the hand with the other glove and inside out over the non dominate hand. Now touching only the inside out portion of the glove, toss the two gloves into the trash. You can follow that up with a hand wash or use sanitizer.

If you are going to remove a mask at the same time be sure to do it carefully before removing gloves touching only the mask and not your face. Yes a lot of effort but better safe then sorry and the glove removal is actually something you will find easy and quick.
 
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Narrow Path

Well-Known Member
you know, in the US at times we just take so much for granted because compared tomany countires our lives are so at ease and without worry about anything major happening here. i think there are a lot of people who see this situation as just an everyday thing, like colds and flus and it will just go away. But what if it doesnt? As theyve said from the beginning, there is a lot they dont know about this virus. If it is true that it is a "lab created" virus, then it isnt just like an every day virus, or even like other corona viruses. They have yet to kow the duration of the infection, how to contain it, how to treat it. There is so much they are trying to figure out and could tak up to a year or two to even find a vaccine. What is concerning is that they dont even know for sure how it spreads from the outbreaks that have occurred in countries that have had no connection to China. Right now this situation needs much prayer and just do what we can to prepare in case it gets out of control in the US too.
You are touching upon a couple of prep community pillars.... the general public’s tendency towards normalcy bias and cognitive dissonance.

At this point, it doesn’t matter so much if this was engineered or not. It’s something we have to contend with regardless.
 

LisaJoe1986

Well-Known Member
If you live in a large metro area, it means potentially some level of sheltering in place / quarantined, unable to leave your city. It means stock up on food, water, and water filtering / sterilization provisions, cleaning supplies, medicines, toiletries.... just as I have been advocating to my family and friends for the past month. The likelihood appears to be increasing.
I am curious as to why water? Is it not safe to drink the tap water or do you expect the system to go down?
 

Hidden

Well-Known Member
In all my years of watching prophecy, I can't recall a crisis that is global in scope. Most of the birth pains we've seen were usually limited to a country or locality. A few weeks in and this is shaping up to be a true global emergency.

Already China has lost billions of dollars and it has sent shockwaves in other regional economies. Makes me wonder how things would look like in the coming weeks.
 

Lovin Jesus

Well-Known Member
In all my years of watching prophecy, I can't recall a crisis that is global in scope. Most of the birth pains we've seen were usually limited to a country or locality. A few weeks in and this is shaping up to be a true global emergency.

Already China has lost billions of dollars and it has sent shockwaves in other regional economies. Makes me wonder how things would look like in the coming weeks.
I totally agree with you. I also have never seen anything in my lifetime lke all that is going on worldwide at the scale that it is happening similtaneously.. Even unbelievers say it's all historic, unprecidented, and use terms like apocolyptic.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
At this point, it doesn’t matter so much if this was engineered or not. It’s something we have to contend with regardless.
Exactly so. As for cognitive dissonance and normalcy bias, that is common for any extreme situation. It's a defence mechanism that normally keeps us from getting too frantic about every little thing that happens.

People with a greater degree of situational awareness-- the hyper vigilant worriers suffer more anxiety and react more often but in situations like 911, those are the ones who used their common sense and didn't listen to the official line of --shelter in place in your tower offices. They got out quickly and saved themselves.

The trick is not to become too hyper vigilant to the point of spending too much money and efforts on preparing for anything and everything.

It's all about assessing the risk in your own environment and preparing for the greater risks, not for every risk. Here's how it's panning out for us. We now have several cases in the local health district, and down in the lower mainland (vancouver area) an elementary school kid has the virus and exposed their school. Once it hits a local ish school, it's in the community and going to start rolling thru.

For George-- he is 70 this year, he never smoked more than a few cigars in his 20's and he quit that, but he is fighting a brain tumour and I have a number of auto immune problems including asthma. So age plus disease equals higher risk of the deadly pneumonia.

So for us, we've been exploring the online ordering, pickup in the parking lot at our grocery stores. One will do delivery. I have a box of gloves anyways (eczema-- protects my hands from cleaning stuff) and I bought another bottle of Clorox liquid bleach.

I am not bothering with masks. I used to nurse in the olden days in a small hospital that used to wash and sterilize cloth masks-- while I worked we switched to disposables. I remember what my granny used to do in HER nursing days-- before antibiotics were in use. We talked shop. Cloth --a triple layer or more works pretty well to filter stuff out. I'm not planning to be in a viral soup atmosphere like a Chinese hospital ward anytime quick.

I wear glasses, no side protection which I'd be insisting on if I was planning to be out in the community a lot when this gets going. Not going to worry.

I shop at times of day when few people are around anyways. No change there.

I have to be very careful right now about colds-- the simple old fashioned corona virus. I have a surgery upcoming soon to remove the last bit of my non functioning thyroid. I'm not too worried.

I wash my hands LOTS. Please remember to sing the ABC song-- takes about 30 seconds while you rub and scrub the soapy bubbly stuff all over your hands and up your wrists. Rinse, then dry hands WITH THE TAP RUNNING. Use your paper towel that you dry off with to shut the taps off, and to open the door with, so you don't touch what are "contaminated" surfaces and pick up the germs you just carefully washed OFF.

If at home, it's nice to have a stack of fresh clean facecloths that you can use once, then toss into a washbasket. This avoids leaving germs on damp towels as you USE THE FACECLOTH OR TOWEL TO TURN OFF THE TAPS AND OPEN THE BATHROOM DOOR.

Don't use those stupid BLOW DRYERS in public bathrooms. They create a nice windy aerosol of viruses, dried mucous and dog bombs that were on anyone's shoes before you, blowing right up around you.

Take a few PAPER NAPKINS in with you for the express purpose of drying off, turning off the taps and opening the door. DISPOSE of them so you don't keep the germs on you.

TAKE YOUR SHOES OFF when you get home, keep them in a safe spot near the entry, if not outside. The garage is a great spot. Shoes track germs in.

Always wash hands after using the bathroom, blowing your nose (or any other procedure), coming in from a shopping trip etc.

KEEP HAND SANITIZER ALCOHOL GEL HANDY and use it LOTS when out and about.

Don't touch your face or nose. Use hand sanitizer first, and a clean tissue to scratch face or nose with, etc.

Don't shake hands with people or hug them!

Don't use public transportation if you can use your own car.

Water shouldn't be too much of an issue if your usual tap water is safe. On the other hand if you live in an old apartment where the water supply might be a problem (some apartments in China back in the SARS days had some faulty plumbing) then boil before drinking.

I routinely have boiled water sitting in my kettle, which is handy to drink when it's cool (or hot). If you like ice water, stick it in the fridge. Otherwise don't worry about it. Ditto utilities.

By all means have bottled water on hand, --great for earthquakes and floods anyway. Ditto tinned soups that are ready to eat as is or bottled juices. That's standard earthquake prep.

And use common sense. I caught the Vancouver Health board telling people on Friday to go out and shop the malls, there's NO PROBLEM, while our provincial Health Officer is pretty much saying what I've been saying, wash your hands LOTS, stay home if sick, USE hand Sanitizers, avoid crowds.

So if govt officials are doing the usual stupid stuff, ignore them, don't wait for them to help you. Deal with the situation. And Definitely DON"T listen to any silly nonsense about going out, shopping in the malls to help local business out.
 
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Andy C

Well-Known Member
We dont know how this virus will play out over the long haul. We do know this is still far less of a problem then the flu. Everybody has been desensitized to how bad each flu season is, and the numbers seldom get reported. If the numbers were reported by the media for this season alone, panic would surely follow.

I will admit Im paying closer attention, but still nowhere near the panic mode. Below is an article I read today that was written 3 weeks ago.


The novel coronavirus that’s sickening thousands globally — and at least five people in the US— is inspiring countries to close their borders and Americans to buy up surgical masks quicker than major retailers can restock them.

There’s another virus that has infected 15 million Americans across the country and killed more than 8,200 people this season alone. It’s not a new pandemic — it’s influenza.

The 2019-2020 flu season is projected to be one of the worst in a decade, according to the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. At least 140,000 people have been hospitalized with complications from the flu, and that number is predicted to climb as flu activity swirls.

The flu is a constant in Americans’ lives. It’s that familiarity that makes it more dangerous to underestimate, said Dr. Margot Savoy, chair of Family and Community Medicine at Temple University’s Lewis Katz School of Medicine.

“Lumping all the viral illness we tend to catch in the winter sometimes makes us too comfortable thinking everything is ‘just a bad cold,'” she said. “We underestimate how deadly influenza really is.”

Even the low-end estimate of deaths each year is startling, Savoy said: The Centers for Disease Control predicts at least 12,000 people will die from the flu in the US every year. In the 2017-2018 flu season, as many as 61,000 people died, and 45 million were sickened.

In the 2019-2020 season so far, 15 million people in the US have gotten the flu and 8,200 people have died from it, including at least 54 children. Flu activity has been elevated for 11 weeks straight, the CDC reported, and will likely continue for the next several weeks.

Savoy, who also serves on the American Academy of Family Physician’s board of directors, said the novelty of emerging infections can overshadow the flu. People are less panicked about the flu because healthcare providers “appear to have control” over the infection.

“We fear the unknown and we crave information about new and emerging infections,” she said. “We can’t quickly tell what is truly a threat and what isn’t, so we begin to panic — often when we don’t need to.”

The flu can be fatal
Dr. Nathan Chomilo, an adjunct assistant professor of pediatrics at University of Minnesota Medical School, said that the commonness of the flu often underplays its severity, but people should take it seriously.

“Severe cases of the flu are not mild illnesses,” Chomilo said. “Getting the actual flu, you are miserable.”

The flu becomes dangerous when secondary infections emerge, the result of an already weakened immune system. Bacterial and viral infections compound the flu’s symptoms. People with chronic illnesses are also at a heightened risk for flu complications.

Those complications include pneumonia, inflammation in the heart and brain and organ failure — which, in some cases, can be fatal.

Chomilo, an internist and pediatrician for Park Nicollet Health Services, said this flu season has been one of the worst his Minnesota practice has seen since the H1N1 virus outbreak in 2009. Some of his patients, healthy adults in their 30s, have been sent to the Intensive Care Unit, relying on ventilators, due to flu complications.

The virus is always changing
Influenza is tricky because the virus changes every year. Sometimes, the dominant strain in a flu season will be more virulent than in previous years, which can impact the number of people infected and the severity of their symptoms.

Most of these changes in the virus are small and insignificant, a process called antigenic drift. That year’s flu vaccine is mostly effective in protecting patients in spite of these small changes, said Melissa Nolan, an assistant professor at the University of South Carolina’s School of Public Health.

Occasionally, the flu undergoes a rare antigenic shift, which results when a completely new strain of virus emerges that human bodies haven’t experienced before, she said.

Savoy compares it to a block party: The body thinks it knows who — or in this case, which virus — will show up, and therefore, which virus it needs to keep out. But if a virus shows up in a completely new getup, it becomes difficult for the body’s “bouncers” — that’s the immune system — to know who to look for and keep out. The stealthy virus can infiltrate easily when the body doesn’t recognize it.

This flu season, there’s no sign of antigenic shift, the most extreme change. But it’s happened before, most recently in 2009 with the H1N1 virus. It became a pandemic because people had no immunity against it, the CDC reported.

Get your flu shot, experts say
To avoid complications from the flu, Savoy, Chomilo and Nolan have the same recommendation: Get vaccinated.

It’s not easy to tell how flu vaccination rates impact the number of people infected, but Savoy said it seems that the years she struggles to get her patients vaccinated are the years when more patients end up hospitalized with the flu, even if the total number of infections doesn’t budge.

The CDC reported at least 173 million flu vaccine doses have been administered this flu season so far — that’s about 4 million more doses than the manufacturers who make the vaccines projected to provide this season.

Still, there are some who decide skipping the vaccine is worth the risk. A 2017 study found that people decline the flu vaccine because they don’t think it’s effective or they’re worried it’s unsafe, even though CDC research shows the vaccine effectively reduces the risk of flu in up to 60% of the population.

Chomilo said some of his most frustrating cases of the flu are in patients who can’t be vaccinated because of preexisting conditions or their age (children under 6 months old can’t be vaccinated).

There are two important reasons to get the flu vaccine, he said — “Protecting yourself and being a good community member.”

https://ktla.com/news/nationworld/w...mains-greater-threat-than-coronavirus-in-u-s/
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
George and I follow our dr's instructions, and we get the flu shot every year. Once we started doing that we never got the flu. Period. Before that we usually got the flu about every other year. I plan to keep it up. If I were to go back to work as an RN it's mandatory as part of the job here in BC so you don't kill off your vulnerable patients. The FLU is DEADLY for innocent newborns, elderly, those fighting cancer or other serious health problems.

Getting the flu leaves you vulnerable for a secondary infection, often times a pneumonia.

I'm still not sure if the reason for the larger death rates in China, compared to the rest of the world with this COVID-19 virus is because of a LOT of underlying lung problems from Smog, Smoking and TUBERCULOSIS. I've wondered a bit if the pneumonia that is affects a few people in the upper age bracket with ongoing other diseases is simply TB making itself known again.

Evlife posted a terrific medical article way back here, that showed the viral gateway (ACE) sites were switched ON in smokers. That would have the effect of making their lungs almost suck the virus in like a magnet.

I did see that MOST people from mainland China in 78-79 that I was nursing, had TB-- not bad enough to kill them or even affect them much, but they were shedding TB viruses and if they got OTHER diseases that affected their systems enough (like say COVID-19 or the FLU), that TB could take off like a wildfire in dry brush.

We just don't know how this disease will shape up. Looking at the Princess ship off Japan, I'd say it's catchier than the flu, by a long shot, not as catchy as the measles. The current R value is R2. The Flu is around a R1.2 to 1.5 or so if I recall correctly but I didn't check that figure. And if memory suffices, the measles is around an R15.

The flu is a killer. But we don't actually see the same death rate for the COVID-19 out in the rest of the planet. 2 elderly Japanese passengers have died from it who were on the Princess, but considering the age and health concerns of the average cruiser, I'm amazed we haven't seen more. 11 of them on board were OVER 90 years old, none of whom have died!!!!! LET THAT SINK IN!

So I tend to think we won't see the kind of death rates that China has been experiencing. But again, that is just a guess based on watching the Princess ship go thru it.

And call me a nasty hard boiled old biddy but Iran is getting hit hard especially in their religious pilgrimage city of Qoms, and I do notice that the nasty old mullahs that run the place and terrorize their people-- are old men-- some with other health issues. In other words, it might affect them more than the rest of Iran. Here's hoping. Iran could live better with a few less mullahs.
 
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Love His Appearing

Well-Known Member
In the next 30 days someone from just my little family of 6 will be traveling from:

CO to NC
CO to TN
CO to IA
CO to AZ
CO to PA
CO to OR
OR to Canada
CO to HI
CO to Israel

Likely one or two more as my senior is in the midst of college recruiting season.

Two of my four kids are asthmatic and currently on antibiotics, steroids and nebulizer treatments every four hours for some viral thing or another that has affected their breathing. (FTR...nobody even asked us if we had been out of the country or on a cruise or exposed to anyone else who has been sick) I am not worried about corona virus (yet) but I was just showing how QUICKLY my own little family could spread something (or catch something for that matter) just with all the upcoming travel we have planned.

These are all trips we NEED to go on, so hopefully our travel plans remain in tact as we trust the Lord and the excellent suggestions on this thread to keep us safe. Now some would argue that I don't NEED to go to Israel and they would be right, but it is such a deep longing that I am keeping it in the NEED column for now. Same with the visit to see my daughter who is in college in Oregon. ;)

P.S. If you think of it, say a little prayer for my immunocompromised asthmatics. I know many of you are in same boat, but my high school senior has some college baseball tryouts this month and it would be lovely if he could BREATHE.
 
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