Conspiracy Theories, The Occult and Agnosticism

Do you believe conspiracy theories reveal hidden truths?

  • Yes

    Votes: 1 12.5%
  • No

    Votes: 7 87.5%

  • Total voters
    8

MapleLeaf

Well-Known Member
Hi, I am new too (though a long-time lurker). I have a young son on the spectrum so I get excited and encouraged when I meet an adult Believer on the spectrum.

I need to go back and read more of the thread but I pretty much agree with the original post. I have seen some Christian “Truther” videos and some seem more distracted by the conspiracies than what is really in Scripture. Sometimes I wonder if, for SOME, that it is an excuse to satiate their curiosity of the darker things in the world. That is part of the reason I stay away. And discernment can so easily morph into suspicion and paranoia. Not everyone is lying to you.

Back to lurking
 

God's Servant

Well-Known Member
Hey brother in Christ. This is a non-judgemental community, this is not to say we are not afraid to correct error with good motives and with love. We welcome everyone as Christ has also welcomed everyone.

Although I don't personally like to use man-made labels on myself, I am probably on "the spectrum" as there are many things about people I just don't understand and I'm usually introverted, but are easy for most people to grasp. But never let that define us. We are all one in Christ and more than conquerers through Him.

I welcome you to RF in love.
 

Sojourner414

Well-Known Member
Hi, I am new too (though a long-time lurker). I have a young son on the spectrum so I get excited and encouraged when I meet an adult Believer on the spectrum.

I need to go back and read more of the thread but I pretty much agree with the original post. I have seen some Christian “Truther” videos and some seem more distracted by the conspiracies than what is really in Scripture. Sometimes I wonder if, for SOME, that it is an excuse to satiate their curiosity of the darker things in the world. That is part of the reason I stay away. And discernment can so easily morph into suspicion and paranoia. Not everyone is lying to you.

Back to lurking
Welcome to RF, MapleLeaf!

Personally, I think that at least some of the conspiracy theories are a kind of daydream for a subset of folks to feel like "the heroic underground rebels against the 'evil system'". The thing is, it doesn't really cost them anything, as they can always "turn off the fantasy" when they want. Yeah, this world is getting crazy; that said, I think the best thign for those that trust in the Lord is to focus on him and not inadvertently give the ways of this world any notoriety by focusing on them.
 

LetUsReason

New Member
Hi Sempre Coitantis,

I wanted to throw in my two cents regarding your statement about conspiracy theories, as I think this is a very important point. There are a number of things I think we need to recognize here...

First, the phrase "conspiracy theory" is used differently by many people, and is often interpreted opposite by people of opposite viewpoints. That being said, let's go past the "tin foil stigma" for a moment and recognize that all a conspiracy is by definition, is a plan by two of more people conspiring to commit an act, usually criminal, treacherous or treasonous. A conspiracy theory then, is simply an investigation into the evidence, arguments, and reasons to believe a possible conspiracy has or is taking place. In other words, it is an investigation of the truth. There is nothing Biblically wrong with investigating the truth - in fact, to avoid doing this is to surrender your critical thinking and your brain - something we certainly are not intended to do from God's perspective. Blind following of mainstream narratives is one of the most crippling themes I can imagine, although it is widespread today in many forms, contributing to many of the cultural issues we face.

Second, an important point to recognize is the potentially nefarious origins of this term "conspiracy theory", and an understanding of the definitely nefarious way it is used in today's culture. As far as its origin, we have evidence to confidently believe this term was deliberately created by the CIA in 1967 as a way of demeaning anyone who challenges the "official" narrative in any sphere, usually political. In other words, it is a way for those who currently control the narrative to create an atmosphere where people are discouraged from investigating and exposing the truth. This term is used in our modern culture as a "club" to smack people with who dare to question establishment "truths." It is the opposite of encouraging reason, logic, and empiricism (the basic of free thought). In other words, it is a cult control tactic - similar to the idea of not being allowed to question a cult leader.

In April 1967, the CIA wrote a dispatch which coined the term “conspiracy theories” and recommended methods for discrediting such theories. The dispatch was marked “psych” – short for “psychological operations” or disinformation – and “CS” for the CIA’s “Clandestine Services” unit. The dispatch was produced in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the New York Times (imagine the irony!) in 1976. I encourage you to look more deeply into this if you are interested.

The bottom line is that some conspiracy claims are nutty and some are true. Each has to be judged on its own basis of facts and logic. But we should avoid the cultural tendency to call people who we disagree with "conspiracy theorists" as an insult, because to do that is to do exactly what the "narrative controllers" seemingly wanted and still do want - to create an environment hostile to free thought and critical thinking where their wickedness can remain hidden and unchallenged. It is similar to the way Creation Theory is outlawed from public education in favor of Evolution Theory. To many people, Christians are "conspiracy theorists" for believing that there is a deliberate agenda to remove God and the implications of God from the public sphere and introducing beliefs like Evolution to convince people there is an alternative.

From the Christian worldview, we of all people recognize the tendency toward sin in individuals and especially in situations of unchecked power. So then, we of all people, should not only be unsurprised, but we should actually expect the common occurrence of these abuses of power, or "conspiracies." A free society like we have in America can only be maintained through free thought and accountability of those in power. It is natural human behavior through the sin nature to commit conspiracy. It is therefore to be applauded when people avoid the pitfalls of "group think" and learn to develop critical thinking, as well as allowing the Holy Spirit to guide you into all truth (John 16:13).

I hope this helps and adds a perspective you may not have previously considered. God bless!
 

GoldenEagle

Well-Known Member
Hi Sempre Coitantis,

I wanted to throw in my two cents regarding your statement about conspiracy theories, as I think this is a very important point. There are a number of things I think we need to recognize here...

First, the phrase "conspiracy theory" is used differently by many people, and is often interpreted opposite by people of opposite viewpoints. That being said, let's go past the "tin foil stigma" for a moment and recognize that all a conspiracy is by definition, is a plan by two of more people conspiring to commit an act, usually criminal, treacherous or treasonous. A conspiracy theory then, is simply an investigation into the evidence, arguments, and reasons to believe a possible conspiracy has or is taking place. In other words, it is an investigation of the truth. There is nothing Biblically wrong with investigating the truth - in fact, to avoid doing this is to surrender your critical thinking and your brain - something we certainly are not intended to do from God's perspective. Blind following of mainstream narratives is one of the most crippling themes I can imagine, although it is widespread today in many forms, contributing to many of the cultural issues we face.

Second, an important point to recognize is the potentially nefarious origins of this term "conspiracy theory", and an understanding of the definitely nefarious way it is used in today's culture. As far as its origin, we have evidence to confidently believe this term was deliberately created by the CIA in 1967 as a way of demeaning anyone who challenges the "official" narrative in any sphere, usually political. In other words, it is a way for those who currently control the narrative to create an atmosphere where people are discouraged from investigating and exposing the truth. This term is used in our modern culture as a "club" to smack people with who dare to question establishment "truths." It is the opposite of encouraging reason, logic, and empiricism (the basic of free thought). In other words, it is a cult control tactic - similar to the idea of not being allowed to question a cult leader.

In April 1967, the CIA wrote a dispatch which coined the term “conspiracy theories” and recommended methods for discrediting such theories. The dispatch was marked “psych” – short for “psychological operations” or disinformation – and “CS” for the CIA’s “Clandestine Services” unit. The dispatch was produced in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the New York Times (imagine the irony!) in 1976. I encourage you to look more deeply into this if you are interested.

The bottom line is that some conspiracy claims are nutty and some are true. Each has to be judged on its own basis of facts and logic. But we should avoid the cultural tendency to call people who we disagree with "conspiracy theorists" as an insult, because to do that is to do exactly what the "narrative controllers" seemingly wanted and still do want - to create an environment hostile to free thought and critical thinking where their wickedness can remain hidden and unchallenged. It is similar to the way Creation Theory is outlawed from public education in favor of Evolution Theory. To many people, Christians are "conspiracy theorists" for believing that there is a deliberate agenda to remove God and the implications of God from the public sphere and introducing beliefs like Evolution to convince people there is an alternative.

From the Christian worldview, we of all people recognize the tendency toward sin in individuals and especially in situations of unchecked power. So then, we of all people, should not only be unsurprised, but we should actually expect the common occurrence of these abuses of power, or "conspiracies." A free society like we have in America can only be maintained through free thought and accountability of those in power. It is natural human behavior through the sin nature to commit conspiracy. It is therefore to be applauded when people avoid the pitfalls of "group think" and learn to develop critical thinking, as well as allowing the Holy Spirit to guide you into all truth (John 16:13).

I hope this helps and adds a perspective you may not have previously considered. God bless!
:scoregood This is brilliant - it’s helped me - thanks!!
 

JSTyler

Well-Known Member
Hi Sempre Coitantis,

I wanted to throw in my two cents regarding your statement about conspiracy theories, as I think this is a very important point. There are a number of things I think we need to recognize here...

First, the phrase "conspiracy theory" is used differently by many people, and is often interpreted opposite by people of opposite viewpoints. That being said, let's go past the "tin foil stigma" for a moment and recognize that all a conspiracy is by definition, is a plan by two of more people conspiring to commit an act, usually criminal, treacherous or treasonous. A conspiracy theory then, is simply an investigation into the evidence, arguments, and reasons to believe a possible conspiracy has or is taking place. In other words, it is an investigation of the truth. There is nothing Biblically wrong with investigating the truth - in fact, to avoid doing this is to surrender your critical thinking and your brain - something we certainly are not intended to do from God's perspective. Blind following of mainstream narratives is one of the most crippling themes I can imagine, although it is widespread today in many forms, contributing to many of the cultural issues we face.

Second, an important point to recognize is the potentially nefarious origins of this term "conspiracy theory", and an understanding of the definitely nefarious way it is used in today's culture. As far as its origin, we have evidence to confidently believe this term was deliberately created by the CIA in 1967 as a way of demeaning anyone who challenges the "official" narrative in any sphere, usually political. In other words, it is a way for those who currently control the narrative to create an atmosphere where people are discouraged from investigating and exposing the truth. This term is used in our modern culture as a "club" to smack people with who dare to question establishment "truths." It is the opposite of encouraging reason, logic, and empiricism (the basic of free thought). In other words, it is a cult control tactic - similar to the idea of not being allowed to question a cult leader.

In April 1967, the CIA wrote a dispatch which coined the term “conspiracy theories” and recommended methods for discrediting such theories. The dispatch was marked “psych” – short for “psychological operations” or disinformation – and “CS” for the CIA’s “Clandestine Services” unit. The dispatch was produced in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the New York Times (imagine the irony!) in 1976. I encourage you to look more deeply into this if you are interested.

The bottom line is that some conspiracy claims are nutty and some are true. Each has to be judged on its own basis of facts and logic. But we should avoid the cultural tendency to call people who we disagree with "conspiracy theorists" as an insult, because to do that is to do exactly what the "narrative controllers" seemingly wanted and still do want - to create an environment hostile to free thought and critical thinking where their wickedness can remain hidden and unchallenged. It is similar to the way Creation Theory is outlawed from public education in favor of Evolution Theory. To many people, Christians are "conspiracy theorists" for believing that there is a deliberate agenda to remove God and the implications of God from the public sphere and introducing beliefs like Evolution to convince people there is an alternative.

From the Christian worldview, we of all people recognize the tendency toward sin in individuals and especially in situations of unchecked power. So then, we of all people, should not only be unsurprised, but we should actually expect the common occurrence of these abuses of power, or "conspiracies." A free society like we have in America can only be maintained through free thought and accountability of those in power. It is natural human behavior through the sin nature to commit conspiracy. It is therefore to be applauded when people avoid the pitfalls of "group think" and learn to develop critical thinking, as well as allowing the Holy Spirit to guide you into all truth (John 16:13).

I hope this helps and adds a perspective you may not have previously considered. God bless!
100%


And the content and presentation fits your name perfectly :thumbup
 

Jan51

Well-Known Member
Hi Sempre Coitantis,

I wanted to throw in my two cents regarding your statement about conspiracy theories, as I think this is a very important point. There are a number of things I think we need to recognize here...

First, the phrase "conspiracy theory" is used differently by many people, and is often interpreted opposite by people of opposite viewpoints. That being said, let's go past the "tin foil stigma" for a moment and recognize that all a conspiracy is by definition, is a plan by two of more people conspiring to commit an act, usually criminal, treacherous or treasonous. A conspiracy theory then, is simply an investigation into the evidence, arguments, and reasons to believe a possible conspiracy has or is taking place. In other words, it is an investigation of the truth. There is nothing Biblically wrong with investigating the truth - in fact, to avoid doing this is to surrender your critical thinking and your brain - something we certainly are not intended to do from God's perspective. Blind following of mainstream narratives is one of the most crippling themes I can imagine, although it is widespread today in many forms, contributing to many of the cultural issues we face.

Second, an important point to recognize is the potentially nefarious origins of this term "conspiracy theory", and an understanding of the definitely nefarious way it is used in today's culture. As far as its origin, we have evidence to confidently believe this term was deliberately created by the CIA in 1967 as a way of demeaning anyone who challenges the "official" narrative in any sphere, usually political. In other words, it is a way for those who currently control the narrative to create an atmosphere where people are discouraged from investigating and exposing the truth. This term is used in our modern culture as a "club" to smack people with who dare to question establishment "truths." It is the opposite of encouraging reason, logic, and empiricism (the basic of free thought). In other words, it is a cult control tactic - similar to the idea of not being allowed to question a cult leader.

In April 1967, the CIA wrote a dispatch which coined the term “conspiracy theories” and recommended methods for discrediting such theories. The dispatch was marked “psych” – short for “psychological operations” or disinformation – and “CS” for the CIA’s “Clandestine Services” unit. The dispatch was produced in response to a Freedom of Information Act request by the New York Times (imagine the irony!) in 1976. I encourage you to look more deeply into this if you are interested.

The bottom line is that some conspiracy claims are nutty and some are true. Each has to be judged on its own basis of facts and logic. But we should avoid the cultural tendency to call people who we disagree with "conspiracy theorists" as an insult, because to do that is to do exactly what the "narrative controllers" seemingly wanted and still do want - to create an environment hostile to free thought and critical thinking where their wickedness can remain hidden and unchallenged. It is similar to the way Creation Theory is outlawed from public education in favor of Evolution Theory. To many people, Christians are "conspiracy theorists" for believing that there is a deliberate agenda to remove God and the implications of God from the public sphere and introducing beliefs like Evolution to convince people there is an alternative.

From the Christian worldview, we of all people recognize the tendency toward sin in individuals and especially in situations of unchecked power. So then, we of all people, should not only be unsurprised, but we should actually expect the common occurrence of these abuses of power, or "conspiracies." A free society like we have in America can only be maintained through free thought and accountability of those in power. It is natural human behavior through the sin nature to commit conspiracy. It is therefore to be applauded when people avoid the pitfalls of "group think" and learn to develop critical thinking, as well as allowing the Holy Spirit to guide you into all truth (John 16:13).

I hope this helps and adds a perspective you may not have previously considered. God bless!
Excellent first post!
 
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