Concern for queens health.

Círeth

Purry, roary, one.
A terrible day for us. She was a wonderful Queen. She served us well with honour and humility. She vowed to the Lord and to the country that she would serve for her whole life, no matter how long that may be, and she kept her word.

I know that she has been welcomed home with the words, "well done, good and faithful servant."
 

jab777

Well-Known Member
They are calling him that but it’s not official until he announces it.

Whatever it is it will be announced at his ascension council after he returns to London.
It’s just been announced on Sky News that Charles is going with Charles III. Too bad. George VII would have kept the Windsor family continuity starting with George V.
 

TimeWarpWife

Well-Known Member
If Charles was going to be called "George" that would have been a bit confusing because William's oldest son is also named George. As for other kings named Charles not being great kings, this Charles is a woke globalist elite, so I don't hold high hopes for him no matter what name he goes by. :nope
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-61605149

The long reign of Queen Elizabeth II was marked by her strong sense of duty and her determination to dedicate her life to her throne and to her people.
She became for many the one constant point in a rapidly changing world as British influence declined, society changed beyond recognition and the role of the monarchy itself came into question.
Her success in maintaining the monarchy through such turbulent times was even more remarkable given that, at the time of her birth, no-one could have foreseen that the throne would be her destiny.
Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor was born on 21 April 1926, in a house just off Berkeley Square in London, the first child of Albert, Duke of York, second son of George V, and his duchess, the former Lady Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-59761477

This is the moment history stops; for a minute, an hour, for a day or a week; this is the moment history stops.
Across a life and reign, two moments from two very different eras illuminate the thread that bound the many decades together. At each a chair, a desk, a microphone, a speech. In each, that high-pitched voice, those clipped precise vowels, that slight hesitation about public speaking that would never quite seem to leave her.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-62797450

The nation's new monarch King Charles III travelled from Balmoral to London on Friday morning, following the death of his mother the Queen. Journeying alongside his wife, the Queen Consort Camilla, the King flew from Aberdeen to RAF Northolt ahead of his televised address to the nation later. On arrival at Buckingham Palace, he was greeted by thousands of well-wishers in a moving moment.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-62849818

Charles, the longest-serving heir to the throne in British history, is now King. His apprenticeship as heir, lasting 70 years, has made him the best-prepared and oldest new monarch ever to take to the throne.
The 73-year-old King was there throughout his mother's long reign, witnessing generations of world leaders come and go, including 15 UK prime ministers and 14 US presidents.
After Queen Elizabeth II's remarkable, era-defining reign, what kind of King might we expect? And how will a prince used to speaking out on issues adapt to the neutrality of a monarch?
As King, Charles will no longer have his own passport or driving licence - or strong opinions in public. Being monarch supersedes the individual.
It is a case of different roles, different rules, believes leading constitutional expert Professor Vernon Bogdanor.
"He's known from his earliest days that his style will have to change. The public won't want a campaigning monarch,"
 
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