Brexit.

daygo

Well-Known Member
Parliament will be suspended just days after MPs return to work in September - and only a few weeks before the Brexit deadline.
Boris Johnson said a Queen's Speech would take place after the suspension, on 14 October, to outline his "very exciting agenda".
But it means the time MPs have to pass laws to stop a no-deal Brexit on 31 October would be cut.
House of Commons Speaker John Bercow said it was a "constitutional outrage".
The Speaker, who does not traditionally comment on political announcements, continued: "However it is dressed up, it is blindingly obvious that the purpose of [suspending Parliament] now would be to stop [MPs] debating Brexit and performing its duty in shaping a course for the country."

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said: "Suspending Parliament is not acceptable, it is not on. What the prime minister is doing is a smash and grab on our democracy to force through a no deal," he said.
He said when MPs return to the Commons next Tuesday, "the first thing we'll do is attempt legislation to prevent what [the PM] is doing", followed by a vote of no confidence "at some point".
But US President Donald Trump tweeted his support for Mr Johnson, saying it "would be very hard" for Mr Corbyn to seek a no-confidence vote against the PM, "especially in light of the fact that Boris is exactly what the UK has been looking for".

Three Conservative members of the Queen's Privy Council took the request to suspend Parliament to the monarch's Scottish residence in Balmoral on Wednesday morning on behalf of the prime minister.
It has now been approved, allowing the government to suspend Parliament no earlier than Monday 9 September and no later than Thursday 12 September, until Monday 14 October.
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Leader of the House Jacob Rees-Mogg, who was at the meeting with the Queen, said the move was a "completely proper constitutional procedure."
Earlier, Mr Johnson said suggestions the suspension was motivated by a desire to force through a no deal were "completely untrue".
He said he did not want to wait until after Brexit "before getting on with our plans to take this country forward", and insisted there would still be "ample time" for MPs to debate the UK's departure.
"We need new legislation. We've got to be bringing forward new and important bills and that's why we are going to have a Queen's Speech," Mr Johnson added.
Legal precedent and challenge
Shutting down Parliament - known as prorogation - happens after the prime minister advises the Queen to do it.
The decision to do it now is highly controversial because opponents say it would stop MPs being able to play their full democratic part in the Brexit process.
A number of high profile figures, including former Prime Minister John Major, have threatened to go to the courts to stop it, and a legal challenge led by the SNP's justice spokeswoman, Joanna Cherry, is already working its way through the Scottish courts.
After the announcement, Sir John said he had "no doubt" Mr Johnson's motive was to "bypass a sovereign Parliament that opposes his policy on Brexit", and he would continue to seek legal advice.
Brexit calendar

BBC
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Prime Minister Boris Johnson has taken the step of writing to all of the MPs who sit in the House of Commons, outlining his plans to ask for a suspension of Parliament in the first half of September. The move will limit the number of parliamentary days available for opponents of a no-deal Brexit to try to block that possibility.
Dear colleague,
I hope that you had an enjoyable and productive summer recess, with the opportunity for some rest ahead of the return of the House.
I wanted to take this opportunity to update you on the Government's plans for its business in Parliament.
As you know, for some time parliamentary business has been sparse.
The current session has lasted more than 340 days and needs to be brought to a close - in almost 400 years only the 2010-12 session comes close, at 250 days.
Bills have been introduced, which, while worthy in their own right, have at times seemed more about filling time in both the Commons and the Lords, while key Brexit legislation has been held back to ensure it could still be considered for carry-over into a second session.
This cannot continue.
I therefore intend to bring forward a new bold and ambitious domestic legislative agenda for the renewal of our country after Brexit.
There will be a significant Brexit legislative programme to get through but that should be no excuse for a lack of ambition!
We will help the NHS, fight violent crime, invest in infrastructure and science and cut the cost of living.
This morning I spoke to Her Majesty The Queen to request an end to the current parliamentary session in the second sitting week in September, before commencing the second session of this Parliament with a Queen's speech on Monday 14 October.
A central feature of the legislative programme will be the Government's number one legislative priority, if a new deal is forthcoming at EU Council, to introduce a Withdrawal Agreement Bill and move at pace to secure its passage before 31 October.
I fully recognise that the debate on the Queen's Speech will be an opportunity for Members of Parliament to express their view on this Government's legislative agenda and its approach to, and the result of, the European Council on 17-18 October.
It is right that you should have the chance to do so, in a clear and unambiguous manner.
I also believe it is vitally important that the key votes associated with the Queen's Speech and any deal with the EU fall at a time when parliamentarians are best placed to judge the Government's programme.
Parliament will have the opportunity to debate the Government's overall programme, and approach to Brexit, in the run up to EU Council, and then vote on this on 21 and 22 October, once we know the outcome of the Council.
Should I succeed in agreeing a deal with the EU, Parliament will then have the opportunity to pass the Bill required for ratification of the deal ahead of 31 October.
Finally, I want to reiterate to colleagues that these weeks leading up to the European Council on 17/18 October are vitally important for the sake of my negotiations with the EU.
Member States are watching what Parliament does with great interest and it is only by showing unity and resolve that we stand a chance of securing a new deal that can be passed by Parliament.
In the meantime, the Government will take the responsible approach of continuing its preparations for leaving the EU, with or without a deal.
The Leader of the Commons will update the House in the normal fashion with regard to business for the final week.
For now, I can confirm that on Monday 9 September both Houses will debate the motions on the first reports relating to the Northern Ireland (Executive Formation etc) Act 2019 (NIEFA).
Following these debates we will begin preparation to end the Parliamentary session ahead of a Queen's Speech.
The Business Managers in both Houses will shortly engage with their opposite numbers, and MPs more widely, on plans for passing a deal should one be forthcoming.
Decisions will also need to be taken about carrying over some of the bills currently before the House, and we will look to work constructively with the Opposition on this front.
If agreement cannot be reached we will look to reintroduce the bills in the next session, and details on this will be set out in the Queen's Speech.
As always my door is open to all colleagues should you wish to discuss this or any other matter.
Yours sincerely,
Boris Johnson


This is the full letter of Boris Johnson to the MPs.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Parliament suspension: The Queen has approved Prime Minister Boris Johnson's request to suspend Parliament just days after it returns from summer recess next week, and only weeks before the Brexit deadline.
Why this is happening: Johnson is seeking to suspend Parliament so his government can deliver a Queen's Speech on October 14, which lays out the government's agenda for the parliamentary session.
What it means for Brexit: The suspension of Parliament will shorten the amount of time Members of Parliament have to attempt to block a no-deal Brexit before the current deadline. Johnson has said Britain will leave the EU on October 31, with or without a deal.

This is it in a nutshell.
 

Everlasting Life

Through Faith in Jesus
Parliament suspension: The Queen has approved Prime Minister Boris Johnson's request to suspend Parliament just days after it returns from summer recess next week, and only weeks before the Brexit deadline.
Why this is happening: Johnson is seeking to suspend Parliament so his government can deliver a Queen's Speech on October 14, which lays out the government's agenda for the parliamentary session.
What it means for Brexit: The suspension of Parliament will shorten the amount of time Members of Parliament have to attempt to block a no-deal Brexit before the current deadline. Johnson has said Britain will leave the EU on October 31, with or without a deal.

This is it in a nutshell.

Sounds like he's cutting through red tape.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
G and I were on tenterhooks, waiting for the Queen's announcement to prorogue Parliament. Then the announcement came, and Boris has successfully countered the EU by this. The EU and Mr Tusk would be hoping for all the anti democracy types to delay things and make it difficult in Parliament. Now that is suspended,

and La Murky and Mr Macron have to digest this latest bit from Boris! I bet they are having serious heartburn now, because those 2 pretty much bankroll the whole EU in the sense that they are the biggest economies, the best financial shape of most of the EU. They have the MOST to lose from all the problems if Britain crashes out.

Boris is giving them serious incentive to get down to brass tacks on the bargaining table.

My goodness it's exciting to watch sometimes!
 

TheRedeemed

Well-Known Member
I wonder if maybe the Queen is leaning towards the no deal BREXIT... maybe I'm reading too much into the development.
The Queen can always refuse to do anything, that’s her prerogative as monarch and head of state, but to do so could cost her dearly. She is not allowed to take any political stance whatsoever. Previous monarchs who tried or indeed managed to stand up to parliament or the PM ended up out of the job, or worse, some of them ended up dead.

She is not permitted to take sides in any political debates.

You probably are, can't see it. Queen only did what she was supposed to do nothing more nothing less.
Yes she has to take the advice of the sitting PM and sign the prorogue document, ending the parliamentary session.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
The Queen can always refuse to do anything, that’s her prerogative as monarch and head of state, but to do so could cost her dearly. She is not allowed to take any political stance whatsoever. Previous monarchs who tried or indeed managed to stand up to parliament or the PM ended up out of the job, or worse, some of them ended up dead.

She is not permitted to take sides in any political debates.



Yes she has to take the advice of the sitting PM and sign the prorogue document, ending the parliamentary session.
She abides by the rule of law, but I shudder to think what Charles will do when it's his turn. Maybe he will be fine but he is an avowed globalist. And I remember his statement regards the growing Muslim population in England in which he stated he wanted to change from Defensor Fidelis (Defender of THE Faith) to Defender of ALL Faiths.
 

TheRedeemed

Well-Known Member
She abides by the rule of law, but I shudder to think what Charles will do when it's his turn. Maybe he will be fine but he is an avowed globalist. And I remember his statement regards the growing Muslim population in England in which he stated he wanted to change from Defensor Fidelis (Defender of THE Faith) to Defender of ALL Faiths.
Oh yes indeed, there’s an appetite in the UK establishment for avoiding having Charles on the throne. If they could get away with it, they would probably like to by-pass him altogether and get William to take over after the Queen’s demise.

Short of Charles popping off before mummy though, it’s not something that can be done easily. I think they fear he will cause the monarchy to collapse. Strangely in an interview on his 70th birthday, Charles stated that all his protestations (he apparently writes huge screeds to MP’s and committees with some strong views and weird requests) and political involvement would end upon the death of his mother and he becomes King.

Obviously someone must be impressing this upon him just now for him to voluntarily throw that information into the interview unprompted.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
I've heard of his crabby little missives to the MP's and committees! As you said, "Strong views and weird requests", well put!

I think HRH is trying to get it across to her first born that he must behave or the family enterprise is gone like so many monarchies before them. William seems to have a very cautious and steady nature that his father is lacking. But there's no way the succession can be bypassed as you said, that would be a terrible constitutional crisis of a greater magnitude than Edward marrying Wallis Simpson and expecting to remain on the throne.

God SAVE the QUEEN! Heartfelt! She's monarch over Canada too, and a very important figure in our Parliamentary system although at arms length thru the Governor General.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Ruth Davidson has quit as leader of the Scottish Conservatives after eight years in the job.
In a statement she said it had been the "privilege of my life" to have led the party.
But she added that "much had changed" both politically and personally, which had led her to tender her resignation.
Ms Davidson had a baby last year, and has been a vocal critic of Prime Minister Boris Johnson - particularly over his approach to Brexit.
She also said her personal priorities had changed, and the prospect of spending hundreds of hours away from her son and partner during a possible election campaign now filled her with "dread".
The 40-year-old, who will continue as the MSP for Edinburgh Central, tweeted her resignation statement shortly before addressing the media at an event in Edinburgh on Thursday morning.

Much has been said about this about her disagreeing with Boris, now its come out that it is false and it just what it says above due to personal reasons. The people responsible should be made to apologise.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Prominent anti-Brexit campaigner Gina Miller has issued legal proceedings in an attempt to put a stop to Boris Johnson suspending Parliament.
Ms Miller, who has previously challenged the Government on implementing Brexitwithout approval from MPs, described the Prime Minister’s decision to prorogue Parliament as “shocking”.
Speaking to BBC News, Ms Miller said the PM was "hijacking the Queen's prerogative power" and using it for "unscrupulous means”.

She added: "I think that is what so shocking about this, is that it’s a very cowardly way of using these powers and constitutional convention.
"Our unwritten constitution is a bit like a gentleman's agreement, and you have to say it's not been used in that manner.”
In 2016, Ms Miller launched a successful legal bid, with judges ruling that MPs would have to vote before the Government could invoke Article 50 to formally start the UK's exit process from the EU.
A separate bid has been launched by pro-Remain barrister Jo Maugham, director of the Good Law Project, who has filed a motion asking the Scottish Court of Session to suspend the PM request that Parliament be prorogued.
Former Tory prime minister Sir John Major also said on Wednesday he is seeking advice on the legality of Mr Johnson proroguing Parliament.
More than one million people have signed a petition calling on the PM not to suspend Parliament, while thousands of people rallied for hours outside Parliament on Wednesday night, with smaller demonstrations taking place in other towns and cities.
Prime Minister Boris Johnson during his meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe for bilateral talks during the G7 summit in Biarritz, France.
Boris Johnson said he was suspending Parliament so he could push through his domestic agenda (PA)
The plan to suspend Parliament was heavily criticised by opposition parties and some Conservative MPs.
Mr Johnson said he wanted to prorogue Parliament in order to bring the current record-breaking session to a close in order to bring forward his Government's new legislative agenda.
But opposition leaders said the Prime Minister is trying to halt their efforts to block a no-deal Brexit.
Gina Miller speaks to the media at the High Court in London where three judges have ruled against the Prime Minister's decision to trigger Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty of the Lisbon Treaty and start the UK's exit from the European Union without the prior authority of Parliament.
The anti-Brexit campaigner described the suspension of Parliament as 'shocking' (PA)
MPs will return to Parliament on Tuesday, but just over a week later on September 10, at the earliest, Parliament could be prorogued until October 14 ahead of a Queen's Speech.
Mr Johnson's prorogation plan came just a day after opposition leaders struck a deal to try to block a no-deal Brexit through legislative means.
Liberal Democrat leader Jo Swinson told the BBC's Newsnight programme that anti-no-deal MPs could use "arcane and unusual" legislative routes to try to block the UK leaving the EU without a deal.
Protestors from Another Europe is Possible outside the Houses of Parliament, London, to demonstrate against Prime Minister Boris Johnson temporarily closing down the Commons from the second week of September until October 14 when there will be a Queen's Speech to open a new session of Parliament.
Protests took place outside Parliament following Mr Johnson's announcement (PA)






Gina Miller: No Plan B is height of irresponsibility
Anti-Brexit campaigner Gina Miller says the government's lack of a Plan B for Brexit is "the height of irresponsibility".
She added: "There are legislative avenues being explored between cross-party groups of members of Parliament with legal and constitutional experts looking at how this can be done, and different routes.
"We have got a Government that is prepared to take unprecedented routes and so we are looking at options as well that might be arcane or unusual that could be employed."

This is the one who started it all with her legal battle, still fuming over the law courts chucking out the govts appeal, now shes back. lets see what happens now.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
The Queen’s Speech on 14 October is not just a device to try to shut down opponents of a no-deal Brexit – it is also Boris Johnson’s chance to set out a programme for a general election after we have left the EU.
Next Wednesday Sajid Javid, the chancellor, will set out the government’s spending plans for the next year. Despite insisting he would stick to his predecessor’s fiscal rules, Javid is bound to declare austerity is over (again) and announce big spending on voter-sensitive headlines – the NHS, schools and police.
Assuming that Jeremy Corbyn fails to carry a vote of no confidence in Johnson’s government next week, the road will then be clear for a final Brexit showdown in the last two weeks of October.
No one can predict what will happen then, but if Johnson succeeds in taking Britain out of the EU, with or without a deal, he will have completed only the first level in his quest to be remembered as more than another failed stopgap prime minister.
He will still have a notional majority, even with the Democratic Unionist Party on board, of one – and that is likely to have disappeared altogether by then if there are further Brexit-related defections from the Conservative Party.
So he has no prospect of governing effectively, even if parts of public opinion will be deeply grateful to him for breaking the Brexit deadlock, and even if larger parts of his own party carry him shoulder high through the streets as their conquering hero.
That is why he has to go for an election soon. The threat from the Brexit Party will have been parried, even if Nigel Farage tries to complain about the “wrong sort of Brexit”. And Labour will still struggle to fend off the Liberal Democrats, even if the immediate question of EU membership has been decided.
Hence the Queen’s Speech will be stuffed full of the measures relating to the NHS, schools and police numbers. It will be a big attempt to present the Johnson government as full of ideas for the whizzy technological economy of the future.

No doubt ministers will spend the weeks before the Queen’s Speech trumpeting Johnson’s programme, including the end of austerity, and how radically different it is from Theresa May’s.
By contrast, the opponents of a no-deal Brexit seem destined to spend that time banging on about constitutional procedure, which – if they fail to stop no-deal – will only strengthen Johnson’s position.
If the prime minister succeeds in taking the country out of the EU, his next big decision is not whether to go for a general election but when. If we have come out without a deal, there may be a case for a quick dash to the polls before the economic consequences of no-deal have hit hard. Alternatively, if there is likely to be short-term disruption followed by a period of calm before the longer-term negative effects feed through, there may be a case for an election in the spring of 2020.
Of course, the date of an election is no longer strictly in the prime minister’s hands, requiring a two-thirds vote of the Commons. But, as in 2017, Corbyn would feel he had to ask Labour MPs to vote for an early election, having demanded one for so long.
One way or another, I suspect we are heading for a general election in the next few months.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
NewsCorbyn requests immediate meeting with Queen in bid to stop Boris Johnson suspending Parliament

PA

Jeremy Corbyn has written to the Queen requesting a meeting "as a matter of urgency" in a bid to stop Boris Johnson suspending parliament.
The move came after the prime minister revealed he had requested the monarch to use a procedure known as "prorogation" to halt sittings in both the Commons and Lords from the second week in September until a Queen's Speech on 14 October.
In a letter to the Queen, the Labour leader argued that this would "deprive the electorate of the opportunity to have their representatives hold the Government to account" in the crucial weeks leading up to the scheduled date of Brexit on 31 October.
And Mr Corbyn revealed that opponents of a no-deal Brexit aim to table legislation next week to prevent it, before challenging Mr Johnson's position with a vote of no confidence "at some point".
"There is a danger that the royal prerogative is being set directly against the wishes of a majority of the House of Commons," Mr Corbyn wrote.
Jeremy Corbyn hosted a meeting on Tuesday of senior MPs on stopping no-deal Brexit (AFP/Getty )

"In the circumstances, as the leader of the offical opposition, on behalf of all my party members and many other members of parliament, I request you to grant me a meeting, along with other privy councillors, as a matter of urgency and before any final decision is taken."
His letter was sent shortly after a cross-party meeting of Westminster groupings opposed to a no-deal Brexit, including Labour, Liberal Democrats and the Scottish National Party, to discuss how to counter what former cabinet minister Sir Ed Davey has described as an attempted "coup" by Mr Johnson.
Mr Corbyn said: “I’ve protested in the strongest possible terms on behalf of my party and I believe all the other opposition parties are going to join in with this and in simply saying suspending parliament is not acceptable, it is not on.
“What the prime minister is doing is a sort of smash-and-grab on our democracy in order to force through a no-deal exit from the European Union. What’s he so afraid of that needs to suspend parliament to prevent parliament discussing these matters?
"So when parliament does meet, on his timetable, very briefly next week, the first thing we will do is attempt legislation to prevent what he is doing and secondly we will challenge him in a motion of confidence at some point.’

The lengths these people are going to.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
A cross-party group of MPs is seeking an emergency ruling from Scotland's top court to put the brakes on Boris Johnson's request to suspend parliament.
Amid outrage at the plans, the group of more than 70 pro-EU parliamentarians filed a fast-track motion at the Court of Session in Edinburgh on Wednesday for an interim injunction to prevent parliament from being prorogued ahead of the Brexit deadline.
The legal bid, which was launched last month, had been due to be heard on 6 September, however The Independent understands it is now scheduled for Thursday.
It comes as Mr Johnson was accused of committing a "constitutional outrage" after he announced plans to suspend the sitting of the Commons ahead of a Queens Speech on 14 October.
The news has plunged Westminster into chaos and derailed plans by anti no-deal MPs to use legislation to block a disorderly departure from the EU.
 
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