Brexit.

Hidden

Well-Known Member
Isn't that the truth! Just like over in Israel where Netanyahu wins the election but everyone and his uncle decides he can't possibly lead the country, so they are in another election!

Whatever happened to letting voters elect their leaders? And if they don't choose Jeremy, well then Jeremy doesn't get to be PM. But that thought doesn't seem to cross these deluded nutbars minds!

Praying for Boris and British voters to succeed in this Banana Republic style revolution that the leftists and globalists are trying to hatch.
I've come across a video today by a popular social media personality, and he argues against democracy. He said there are better systems like democracy like technocracy. I was like, how are you supposed to choose the technocrats that would run the government without impinging on other people's rights to self-determination? Hello...these people really are so ready to give themselves over to the Antichrist.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
Germany expects No Deal and will not renegotiate, says leaked briefing

Germany expects a No Deal Brexit and is not prepared to renegotiate the withdrawal agreement, according to leaked details of an internal briefing paper for Angela Merkel’s government.

The leaked paper is the first evidence that Germany may be preparing to let Britain walk away with No Deal rather than back down to Boris Johnson’s demand to drop the Irish backstop.

The paper was prepared by civil servants for the German finance minister, Olaf Scholz, ahead of face-to-face talks with the chancellor of the exchequer, Sajid Javid, in Berlin on Friday.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/germany-expects-no-deal-not-111725069.html
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
This doesn't make sense, Germany is desperate for Britain to have a deal, would be bad for Germany for Britain to go without a deal.
Merkel would rather cut her nose off to spite her face as the saying goes. She and the other globalists are so angry with Brexit, that they'd rather harm themselves alongside Britain than negotiate a settlement. Talk about a bad divorce. Easily in, not so easily out.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Unless the UK's withdrawal agreement with Brussels is reopened and the backstop abolished there is no prospect of a deal, No 10 has said.
The strong statement came after the EU pushed back against Boris Johnson's proposal to implement "alternative arrangements" for the UK-Irish border.
Mr Johnson has said the backstop is "anti-democratic" and must be scrapped.
But Donald Tusk said it was "an insurance to avoid a hard border on the island of Ireland".
Meanwhile, the government has said UK officials will stop attending most EU meetings from 1 September.
The Department for Exiting the European Union said it would "unshackle" them from discussions "about the future of the Union after the UK has left" and allow them to focus on "our immediate national priorities".

This week Mr Johnson will meet German Chancellor Angela Merkel and French President Emmanuel Macron for the first time since entering No 10.
Ahead of that, in a letter to European Council President Tusk, he called for the backstop to be removed from the withdrawal agreement reached between the EU and his predecessor, Theresa May, arguing it risked undermining the Northern Irish peace process.
The border is a matter of great political, security and diplomatic sensitivity, and both the UK and EU agree that whatever happens after Brexit there should be no new physical checks or infrastructure at the frontier.
The backstop is a position of last resort to guarantee that, but if implemented, it would see Northern Ireland stay aligned to some rules of the EU single market.
It would also involve a temporary single customs territory, effectively keeping the whole of the UK in the EU customs union.
Mrs May's withdrawal agreement has been rejected three times by MPs.

A series of voices from the European side rejected Mr Johnson's assertions.
Mr Tusk said those opposing the backstop without "realistic alternatives" supported re-establishing a hard border.
This was the reality "even if they do not admit it", he added.
The European Commission said Mr Johnson's letter did not contain a "legally operational solution" to prevent a hard Irish border.
"It does not set out what any alternative arrangements could be," a spokeswoman said, and "recognises that there is no guarantee such arrangements would be in place by the end of the transitional period".
Guy Verhofstadt, Brexit spokesman for the European Parliament, said the backstop was "a vital insurance policy... supported by the people of the island of Ireland".
A Downing Street spokesperson insisted the UK government was "ready to negotiate, in good faith, an alternative to the backstop, with provisions to ensure that the Irish border issues are dealt with where they should always have been: in the negotiations on the future agreement between the UK and the EU".
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said it was unclear what the prime minister thought he was negotiating.
"He needs to recognise that by just holding the threat of a no-deal Brexit on 31 October towards the European Union isn't going to bring about a change, it's going to make things much worse," he said.
"He created this arbitrary date by his behaviour during the Tory Party leadership campaign. He needs to wise up and stop the nonsense of 31 October and start talking seriously."

Corbyn needs to recognise hes part of the problem.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Nigel Farage's Brexit party has vowed to fight "tooth and nail" against any deal that Boris Johnson negotiates with the EU that largely retains the Withdrawal Agreement.
On Monday, Johnson wrote to Donald Tusk, the president of the European Council, repeating the demand that the EU scraps the Northern Irish backstop as a precursor to any deal.
The prime minister proposed instead that the UK government simply give firm commitments to resolving concerns about the future relationship between Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic.
"This government will not put in place infrastructure, checks, or controls at the border between Northern Ireland and Ireland," Johnson wrote. "We would be happy to accept a legally binding commitment to this effect and hope that the EU would do likewise.

Senior Brexit party officials reacted with fury to the letter, which appeared to suggest that the rest of the agreement – which was negotiated by Johnson's predecessor, Theresa May – was acceptable.
Farage tweeted on Monday night that "even without the backstop, this is still the worst 'deal' in history".

Lance Forman MEP agreed, saying: “Removing the backstop is not enough. [The Withdrawal Agreement] is a terrible agreement drawn up by Remainers. We will be stuck with it forever. Not a great legacy. All we need is a Free Trade Deal. That works for both parties. Win-win.”
And party chairman Richard Tice was equally forthright, tweeting: “Let’s be clear: the WA even without the backstop is still the worst deal in history, is not Brexit and the Brexit Party will fight it tooth and nail.
“This letter confirms our fears that Boris and the Tories cannot be trusted to deliver a proper Brexit.”
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
The party also released a new digital ad campaign that featured a Post-it note of what the “Tory Withdrawal Agreement means”. “Northern Ireland Backstop” is crossed out but eight other items remain, including “We pay the EU £39bn”, “British fishing subject to quotas” and “EU sets British tax rates”.
Brexit Party advert challenging the Tories over the Withdrawal Agreement


We need a Clean-Break Brexit by October 31st,” the advert proclaims.
The row appears to mark the first efforts of the party to put clear blue water between it and the Tories on Brexit by maintaining a stance of “No deal is the best deal”.
Since it became apparent Johnson was going to be the next prime minister, the Brexit party has slumped from first place in the polls at 26% shortly after the European elections to fourth and 14% as the new Tory leader has stripped it of Leave-backing voters.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
A sudden end to free movement if Britain leaves the European Union without a deal could be “close to impossible,” an expert has warned.
The freedom of movement under EU rules allows allows citizens of EU member states freedom to work and live in any country within the bloc.
Business leaders have hit out a plans for a rapid shakeup of rules, blasting the government for leaving the immigration system “up in the air,” after a home office spokesman said freedom of movement between the bloc and Britain would end on 31 October.
The comments seem to suggest tighter rules for EU migration could be introduced than previously planned under Theresa May, but the lack of details and time to prepare sparked anger among firms.
Joe Owen, Brexit programme director at Institute for Government think tank, questioned if the government was even serious about meaningful reform, warning employers were “completely unprepared for this last-minute U-turn.”

He said previous reforms had taken almost two years to draft and four years to roll out, while significant reforms would require legislation unlikely to pass through parliament in the near-future.
“Does [home secretary Priti] Patel really believe it is possible to design, build and roll-out a new system in just eight weeks?”

Owen said rushed, unfinished reforms meant yet more uncertainty and “major disruption” for firms and EU workers, when the government had previously said it planned to give firms a year to prepare.
“Employers will be in the middle of recruitment processes for after October, and many will have already offered jobs tor EU citizens,” he added.
He also warned it risked “a larger-scale repeat of the Windrush scandal” but for EU citizens, with “no way” for firms to distinguish between new arrivals and European workers who had lived in the UK for years.
The Windrush scandal centred around people from Commonwealth countries who arrived in the UK and were born before 1973. When they first entered the UK, they had the right to live in Britain indefinitely. However, in 2017, thousands of people were reported (although the final number was not conclusive) to have faced deportation or lost access to services because they couldn’t prove that they lived in Britain since before 1973.

Josh Hardie, deputy director-general of the Confederation of British Industry (CBI), said: “Businesses and workers know the immigration system is changing. Yet announcing that the existing arrangements may end before a replacement has been designed, delivered or tested will only cause confusion.
“Now is the time for Government to reduce uncertainty, not add to it unnecessarily and hinder no deal preparations,” he said, calling for a two-year transition for firms to adapt and officials to avoid costly mistakes for migrants themselves.

Adam Marshall, director-general of the British Chambers of Commerce (BCC), said businesses had planned on the basis of the home office’s previous official no-deal Brexit guidance.
He said there now “hints that it’s all up in the air” with just weeks until Brexit, adding: “Firms need clarity and consistency to prepare for change.”
A home office spokesman had announced in a statement: “Freedom of movement as it currently stands will end on 31 October when the UK leaves the EU, and after Brexit the government will introduce a new, fairer immigration system that prioritises skills and what people can contribute to the UK, rather than where they come from.”
 

Círeth

Well-Known Member
I've come across a video today by a popular social media personality, and he argues against democracy. He said there are better systems like democracy like technocracy. I was like, how are you supposed to choose the technocrats that would run the government without impinging on other people's rights to self-determination? Hello...these people really are so ready to give themselves over to the Antichrist.
All forms of human government are flawed but democracy works best out of the lot. I can't wait for the Lord's perfect government in the millennium.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Boris Johnson has met Emmanuel Macron in Paris for Brexit talks, with the French president saying the UK's vote to quit the EU must be respected.
But he added that the Ireland-Northern Ireland backstop plan was "indispensable" to preserving political stability and the single market.
The backstop, opposed by Mr Johnson, aims to prevent a hard border on the island of Ireland after Brexit.
Mr Johnson said that with "energy and creativity we can find a way forward".
On Wednesday German Chancellor Angela Merkel said the onus was on the UK to find a workable plan.

UK Prime Minister Mr Johnson insists the backstop must be ditched if a no-deal exit from the EU on 31 October is to be avoided.
He argues that it could leave the UK tied to the EU indefinitely, contrary to the result of the 2016 referendum, in which 52% of voters opted to leave.
But the EU has repeatedly said the withdrawal deal negotiated by former PM Theresa May, which includes the backstop, cannot be renegotiated.
However, it has previously said it would be willing to "improve" the political declaration - the document that sets out the UK's future relationship with the EU.

Speaking after he greeted Mr Johnson at Paris's Elysee Palace, Mr Macron said he was "very confident" that the UK and EU would be able to find a solution within 30 days - a timetable suggested by Mrs Merkel - "if there is a good will on both sides".
He said it would not be possible to find a new withdrawal agreement "very different from the existing one" within that time, but added that an answer could be reached "without reshuffling" the current deal.
Mr Macron also denied that he was the "hard boy in the band", following suggestions that he would be tougher on the UK than his German counterpart.

Standing beside Mr Macron, Mr Johnson said he had been "powerfully encouraged" by his conversations with Mrs Merkel in Berlin on Wednesday.
He emphasised his desire for a deal with the EU but added that it was "vital for trust in politics" that the UK left the EU on 31 October.
He also said that "under no circumstances" would the UK put checks or controls on the Ireland-UK border.
The two leaders ate lunch, drank coffee and walked through the Elysee gardens together during their talks, which lasted just under two hours. Mr Johnson then left to fly back to the UK.
If implemented, the backstop would see Northern Ireland staying aligned to some rules of the EU single market, should the UK and the EU not agree a trade deal after Brexit.
It would also see the UK stay in a single customs territory with the EU, and align with current and future EU rules on competition and state aid.
These arrangements would apply until both the EU and UK agreed they were no longer necessary.
Mrs Merkel has argued that the withdrawal agreement does not need to be reopened if a practical solution to the backstop crisis can be found.
Brexit is due to happen on 31 October, with no deal being the default option. The prime minister has said he wants to leave the EU with a deal, but that the UK would be ready if none is reached.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
A key part of the Brexit negotiations has been the border that separates Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland.
The border is a matter of great political, security and diplomatic sensitivity in Ireland.
Therefore the UK and EU agreed that whatever happens as a result of Brexit there should be no new physical checks or infrastructure at the frontier.
This is where the controversial "backstop" comes in.
Go on then, what is the backstop?
The backstop is a position of last resort, to maintain a seamless border on the island of Ireland.
It would involve the UK retaining a very close relationship with the EU for an indefinite period.
It will apply if the UK and EU have not agreed a final deal at the end of a standstill transition period or if that final deal does not guarantee a soft border.
It will not apply if the UK leaves without a deal in October.
The EU have insisted that any Brexit deal must contain the backstop.
Why might it be needed?
At present, goods and services are traded between the two jurisdictions with few restrictions.
That is because the UK and Ireland are part of the EU's single market and customs union, so products do not need to be inspected for customs or standards.

But, after Brexit, all that could change - the two parts of Ireland could be in different customs and regulatory regimes, which could mean products being checked at the border.
The preference of both sides is to prevent this happening through a deep and comprehensive trade deal.
However, the UK's current red lines, which include leaving the customs union and the single market, make that very difficult.
A technological solution for the border is favoured by many Brexit supporters but the EU are very sceptical about whether it can work without a degree of close regulatory alignment.
What if the trade deal or the technology aren't enough?
Then the backstop would be applied.
It would see Northern Ireland staying aligned to some rules of the EU single market.
But, after Brexit, all that could change - the two parts of Ireland could be in different customs and regulatory regimes, which could mean products being checked at the border.
The preference of both sides is to prevent this happening through a deep and comprehensive trade deal.
However, the UK's current red lines, which include leaving the customs union and the single market, make that very difficult.
A technological solution for the border is favoured by many Brexit supporters but the EU are very sceptical about whether it can work without a degree of close regulatory alignment.
What if the trade deal or the technology aren't enough?
Then the backstop would be applied.
It would see Northern Ireland staying aligned to some rules of the EU single market.

They feared that the backstop would be used to permanently trap the UK in the EU customs union, preventing the country from striking its own trade deals.
Some MPs said the backstop would only be acceptable if it had a strict time limit or if the UK had a unilateral right to end the arrangement.
The DUP, a Northern Ireland unionist party that props up Mrs May's minority government, also objected strongly saying it would not accept any additional Northern Ireland-only checks, because it is concerned that any differences between NI and Great Britain could threaten the union.
However, business and farming groups in Northern Ireland urged support for the backstop saying it was an acceptable way to protect cross-border trade.
Non-unionist political parties in Northern Ireland also support the backstop.
However, Mrs May's failure to get parliamentary support for the backstop would ultimately lead to her resignation.
What does legal advice on the backstop say?
In March 2019 the EU and UK agreed a joint interpretation of the backstop, clarifying the earlier deal.
It explained the ways in which UK could start a "formal dispute" against the EU, if it tried to keep the UK tied into the backstop indefinitely.
It also emphasised that the EU would undertake joint work to find the technological solutions favoured by Brexit supporters.
This was intended to help Theresa May win parliamentary support for the backstop.
However, her Attorney General, Geoffrey Cox, concluded that "the legal risk remains unchanged" that if a post-Brexit trade agreement cannot be reached due to genuinely "intractable differences", the UK would have "no internationally lawful means" of leaving the backstop without EU agreement.
What happens now?
Prime Minister Boris Johnson says he is committed to "getting rid" of the backstop, describing it as "divisive" and "anti-democratic".
"No country that values its independence, and indeed its self-respect, could agree to a treaty which signed away our economic independence and self-government as this backstop does," Mr Johnson told the House of Commons.
He is adamant that a no-deal Bexit is preferable to the backstop.
However, the EU has, so far, given no signal that it will be willing to renegotiate.
 

daygo

Well-Known Member
Boris Johnson has accused the EU of being too “negative” after both Angela Merkel and Brussels chief Donald Tusk trashed his latest Brexit plans as a non-starter.
In a clear signal that he’s gearing up to blame the EU for a no-deal outcome this autumn, the prime minister said that Berlin and Paris were just sticking to a “mantra” after they flatly rejected his plea to reopen talks.
Rebel Tory and Labour MPs were also in his sights as he claimed Brussels was unlikely to grant concessions as long as they believed the Commons was ready to block an exit on October 31.
Ahead of a trip to meet German chancellor and French president and a G7 summit at the weekend, Johnson joked that the only way to get a deal was through a “backstop-ectomy” that removed plans to keep the UK linked indefinitely to EU rules.
The PM insisted that while he was keen on new alternative ways of solving the problem of keeping open borders between Ireland and Northern Ireland, they could only be part of a future trade deal signed after the UK quits the 28-nation bloc on Halloween.
His refusal to budge came as Brexit Secretary Steve Barclay unveiled new plans to remove ministers and officials from most EU meetings from September 1.
Earlier, the EU effectively closed the door on any fresh talks, flatly rejecting Johnson’s request on Monday night to remove the ‘backstop’ from any withdrawal deal and instead discuss other unspecified “guarantees”.
Merkel made clear she stood firm with the rest of her colleagues in insisting that she would not tear up the withdrawal agreement hammered out with May over the past two years.

The German leader said that she was ready to find “practical solutions” to the Irish border issue, but sent a stark warning that any compromise could only come in the future declaration on EU-UK relations - something Tory and DUP MPs have ruled out.
“We don’t need to open up the withdrawal agreement. It’s a question of the future relationship,” she said.
Norbert Rottgen, an ally of Merkel’s, was even more withering, declaring “the letter to the president of the European Council is not a serious offer, and Boris Johnson knows it”.
EU Council president Tusk was just as blunt, tweeting that the UK government’s failure to propose “realistic alternatives” would cause real problems on the Irish issue, “even if they do not admit it”.
European Parliament Brexit coordinator Guy Verhofstadt said: “The time for bluster and political blame games is fast running out.”
In a pooled broadcast interview, the PM said the fact was that May’s deal had been voted down three times by the UK parliament and other ways forward were needed.
“At the moment it is absolutely true that our friends and partners are a bit negative. I saw what Donald Tusk had to say, and it wasn’t redolent of a sense of optimism.
“I’m going off to Germany and then to France, and then to see the G7 [summit] at Biarritz, and I’m going to make the point that the backstop is going to come out.
“It may be that for now, they stick with the mantra, rien ne va plus, and they can’t change a jot or a tittle of the WA [withdrawal agreement]. Let’s see how long they stick to that, I think there are plenty of other creative solutions.”
He told ITV News: “All we are saying to our friends and partners is it is time to remove that backstop, get rid of it, have a total backstop-ectomy and I think then we can make progress.”
But as well as appearing to blame the EU for a lack of compromise, Johnson also made plain that MPs opposed to a no-deal Brexit would also be held responsible.
“Our EU friends still clearly think there is a possibility that Parliament will block Brexit, and as long as they think that there is a possibility that Parliament will block Brexit, they are unlikely to be minded to make the concessions that we need,” he said.
In his letter to the EU on Monday, Johnson said he was ready to work “constructively and flexibly” on new “commitments” to prevent a hard border with Ireland. But many critics said the plan was so vague it was meaningless.
In yet another sign that the new government is preparing for a no-deal exit, Barclay announced that from next month ministers and officials would not attend most EU meetings.
HuffPost UK understands that the UK will hand its vote to Finland, which currently chairs the EU, and would either abstain or go with the Brussels consensus on matters affecting the bloc’s internal affairs.
But the plan was ridiculed by critics at home and in Europe.
Labour MP and People’s Vote supporter Martin Whitfield said: “Today brings us the great flounce, as UK ministers and officials are told to pack their bags, switch off their phones and stop talking to our EU colleagues. It is a pitiful retreat from our position at the heart of European decision-making.”
Lib Dem MP Tom Brake added: “This petulant move, and the inflammatory language used to describe it, demonstrates that this Conservative Government is not serious about constructively engaging with our EU partners. The situation is a national embarrassment.”
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
The EU is using the backstop stuff as blackmail to keep the UK subservient to the EU and to prevent a full Brexit.

The EU is terrified of a full Brexit and rejection of that backstop. They KNOW that Ireland's situation is their best bargaining chip/blackmail.

What Boris realizes, and I hope his cabinet and others do to, is that the EU is TERRIFIED of a full Brexit. For 2 reasons that I can think of:

1: They realize that may throw their already fragile balance with regards to member states being forced to remain in the EU into chaos with other states crashing out if they aren't allowed to ease out gracefully.

2: And I am not sure I'm correct here-- this is just my opinion again, so take with a LARGE grain of salt--- but I suspect the EU is more fragile economically than ever. There was a lot of talk a few years back during the Greek and Portuguese financial crisis which extended into Italy, Spain and even Ireland. Since then they've had a LOT of migrant pressures from migrants going onto the overstretched welfare systems to migrants causing pressure on the jails and legal systems of countries that absorbed a lot of them. Denmark in particular is beginning to notice the disporportionate number of inmates in it's jails that come from recent immigration out of the Middle East and North Africa (Muslims).
 
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