Biden to announce ban on US imports of Russian oil

Dave_97

Well-Known Member
Also, there were apparently a LOT of electric cars stuck on I-95 in Virginia when the big snow storm hit--with no heat. No way to keep warm. At least those in gasoline powered cars were able to stay warm for quite a while longer. Gasoline-powered cars don't use much gas when they are idling and if you turn the engine on and off, you can make a tank of gas last until you get rescued.

Electric cars are NOT good for excessively cold or hot weather. In cold weather, you expend a lot of juice just running the heater, and, you reduce battery efficiency in the cold. In the very hot summer temperatures of the desert southwest, the batteries build up excessive heat and could fail entirely. Just what I wanted--a car that only works well in the summer in the north.
This is true, but not necessarily for all electric cars currently. The issue your describing was occurring mainly because most electric vehicles were using Electric Resistance Hearting Systems, which essential is suppose to create heat from the energy drawn.

So engineers did a tremendous job in improving this issue by using heat pumps. A heat pump from what I’m understanding redirects heat. It works like a reverse Air Condition. Go look it up, there is a lot into it.

Basically a heat pump uses less energy in heating a cabin, which then produces better electric car range.

While this not a perfect solution, apparently it has 300 percent efficiency.

Regardless im still currently sticking to gas vehicle. But I do think in the future electric cars could end up being more efficient, just my opinion.
 

pixelpusher

Well-Known Member
This is true, but not necessarily for all electric cars currently. The issue your describing was occurring mainly because most electric vehicles were using Electric Resistance Hearting Systems, which essential is suppose to create heat from the energy drawn.

So engineers did a tremendous job in improving this issue by using heat pumps. A heat pump from what I’m understanding redirects heat. It works like a reverse Air Condition. Go look it up, there is a lot into it.

Basically a heat pump uses less energy in heating a cabin, which then produces better electric car range.

While this not a perfect solution, apparently it has 300 percent efficiency.

Regardless im still currently sticking to gas vehicle. But I do think in the future electric cars could end up being more efficient, just my opinion.
Earlier today I was thinking they need to put a windmill on the cars so all the while they are going they are generating. Then I looked, and there's a design called Eolo out of Columbia. It has a horizontal windmill where the grill and engine would normally be. Eventually they may get there. I would not mind having a small, cheap, zero-frills EV for around town, but keep the comfy car with gas engine for longer road trips.
 

Wings Like Eagles

Well-Known Member
This is true, but not necessarily for all electric cars currently. The issue your describing was occurring mainly because most electric vehicles were using Electric Resistance Hearting Systems, which essential is suppose to create heat from the energy drawn.

So engineers did a tremendous job in improving this issue by using heat pumps. A heat pump from what I’m understanding redirects heat. It works like a reverse Air Condition. Go look it up, there is a lot into it.

Basically a heat pump uses less energy in heating a cabin, which then produces better electric car range.

While this not a perfect solution, apparently it has 300 percent efficiency.

Regardless im still currently sticking to gas vehicle. But I do think in the future electric cars could end up being more efficient, just my opinion.
Yes. A heat pump would certainly be an improvement, but it is bound to add to the cost and complexity of the vehicle. Nothing is simpler than electric resistance heating--the reason why an electric baseboard heater is so much cheaper than heat pumps. Heat pumps are great for getting more energy out than you put in. My engineer husband tells me that electric motors are actually much simpler than an internal combustion engine so it makes sense to use electric cars--once they get all of the limiting factors ironed out (not sure that they will be able to anytime soon). In the very early days of automobile transportation, they tried a variety of electric cars--but their low top speed and short-range caused them to be shoved aside in preference to the internal combustion engine. What some married couples are doing is having one gas-powered vehicle and one battery-powered vehicle. The people down the road from us are like that. The husband is a salesman and drives all day long to visit customers. The wife is a teacher at a school a few miles away.
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
This is true, but not necessarily for all electric cars currently. The issue your describing was occurring mainly because most electric vehicles were using Electric Resistance Hearting Systems, which essential is suppose to create heat from the energy drawn.

So engineers did a tremendous job in improving this issue by using heat pumps. A heat pump from what I’m understanding redirects heat. It works like a reverse Air Condition. Go look it up, there is a lot into it.

Basically a heat pump uses less energy in heating a cabin, which then produces better electric car range.

While this not a perfect solution, apparently it has 300 percent efficiency.

Regardless im still currently sticking to gas vehicle. But I do think in the future electric cars could end up being more efficient, just my opinion.
Before we get windmills on our cars, I have a question:
Whether you plug your electric car in a roadside charger or in your garage, what are the originating power sources from which the electric energy is generated?
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
Perhaps someday either in the Millennium or the New Earth we'll have mastered harnessing the energy of a black hole.
That’s what I’m getting at when I question electric cars. We have no idea how long it would take to develop an electric car affordable to the average owner. Even Elon Musk is saying we are still needing to drill oil. And as to “recharging“ now - where do people think the power to recharge comes from? The electric company? And how do they generate their power? From a generator plugged into the wall socket? I’ll let the “researchers” figure it out.
 

Tall Timbers

Imperfect but forgiven
A Tesla costs nearly as much as a Mercedes, can't afford them right now. I never liked the idea of fully-electric cars because if for some reason you run out of power, how are you going to get electricity from the charging station to your vehicle? Also, fueling up a gas-powered vehicle takes three minutes to go from empty to full-tank. But even with fast-charging, it can take several hours to power your all-electric vehicle to at least 80% capacity. If prices keep rising to ever unaffordable levels, I'll buy a foldable bike I can ride around and take inside the stores with me. A bicycle is totally green and can go 90 miles on a single hamburger.

Yeah, in my opinion, electric vehicles aren't ready for prime time. Both distance per charge and time per charge need significant improvement, and infrastructure needs to be in place for charging while people are on road trips.

But now it seems getting that Tesla might not be such a bad idea. Elon Musk about to get super rich. Well richer than he already is lol

I suspect that as the traditional automakers who have decades of experience and lots of support infrastructure start rolling out all electric vehicles, Tesla will become less and less significant a player in that market. In just a couple of years from now I figure Tesla will be 2nd tier player in the electric vehicle market.
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
We have lots here. My grandkids have a very short walk from their school to our house--part of their walk goes through some bush that adjoins our property. One day, I saw them walking on the road instead of taking the short-cut through the wooded area. When I asked them why, the younger one said, "We saw a flock of turkeys and were afraid." (The tom's can be pretty aggressive--flying at whatever offends them and trying to peck at the offending party.)
I think he would choose to have us do without.
I agree. Musk was honest and in essence disputed this administration’s position on fossil fuels. In case no one has mentioned it, the cost of your home “charger” can be from $2,000 to $10,000 depending on the State you live in. I know people in Mississippi who can’t find a decent used car in that price range. TT don’t even think about saying that we can’t afford shoes either!
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
Have you priced a pair of shoes lately? In some 3rd world countries they make slipper/shoes out of canvas and used tire rubber. When it gets worse here, maybe we'll see those in the stores. Hope I can afford those when the time comes.
Actually I was wondering if we could attach electric motors to shoes for short trips. Dangerous in any State, but in Mississippi you can fall into a pothole so big you could disappear entirely, forcing a missing person investigation.
 

HalfGEEK

Active Member
Back in 2014, I leased a Nissan Leaf. I really liked the car. A LOT. I would plug it in the normal wall plug in my garage at night. It would fully charge by morning. I could get about 100 miles in one charge. Most of the time - that was perfect. There were some days when I had to run a lot of errands and those miles would add up quickly. In 3 years of owning it, I only had 2 emergencies where I did not have enough charge to get home. Once I pulled into a recreation park, pulled up super close to the bathroom and ran the charger cable into the bathroom and plugged it into the wall outlet. Once I had to charge it at Whole Foods. Both times, it was kind of nice. Sure, I had to sit there for an hour or more waiting to get enough charge to drive home. But it was impromptu time with God. It was actually nice. I could never take the car on a long trip so we always used my husband's gas-powered truck for trips. The only maintenance I had to do was for the tires. That was SUPER nice and saved even more money. One day, an older Tahoe rear-ended me on the interstate while I was on my way to work. It totaled the car. I tried to replace it with another EV but by then, all of the Federal and State rebates were no longer available. The EV cars were just way too expensive. I could not justify paying $35K or more for an EV that had zero options. I ended up getting a gas-powered vehicle, brand new, fully loaded with all the options for $22k. I did the math and even calculated what it would be with really high gas prices - it was still cheaper to go with the gas vehicle than the EV. I still miss the Leaf. It was so much fun to drive! But I won't be going back until the prices drop or they introduce new incentives.
 

Footsteps

Well-Known Member
Leasing a vehicle, IMO, is a loss in the end, without regard to gas or ev. Big down payment, then you give it back at the end of the lease and own nothing. The company that leased it to you inspects the vehicle looking for every little dent for which they bill you and sometimes have phony close out fees you were never aware of. You can maintain the vehicle diligently, pay the numerous fees associated with having a car, then give it back to its real owner, leaving you to start from scratch.
 

DWB

Well-Known Member
I mentioned earlier in a different chat. I was looking on the market to buy a new car. But now it seems getting that Tesla might not be such a bad idea. Elon Musk about to get super rich. Well richer than he already is lol
Don't forget those Tesla batteries are going to go dead one day. Approx $20k to replace. At that point the car would have no re-sale value. So it's basically a disposable car. Drive it till it dies and throw away.
 

lightofmylife

Blessed Hope-Prepare To Fly!
Sure we can all go out and get an electric car with what they cost. Who can afford that the elite? The normal household is doing good putting the price of gas in our cars and the price of food on our table. We got our car paid off 2 years ago with 2 years of payments. I am glad I still have stimulus money saved because we are both on Social Security. These people are crazy! :loco
 

alisani

Well-Known Member
Back in 2014, I leased a Nissan Leaf. I really liked the car. A LOT. I would plug it in the normal wall plug in my garage at night. It would fully charge by morning. I could get about 100 miles in one charge. Most of the time - that was perfect. There were some days when I had to run a lot of errands and those miles would add up quickly. In 3 years of owning it, I only had 2 emergencies where I did not have enough charge to get home. Once I pulled into a recreation park, pulled up super close to the bathroom and ran the charger cable into the bathroom and plugged it into the wall outlet. Once I had to charge it at Whole Foods. Both times, it was kind of nice. Sure, I had to sit there for an hour or more waiting to get enough charge to drive home. But it was impromptu time with God. It was actually nice. I could never take the car on a long trip so we always used my husband's gas-powered truck for trips. The only maintenance I had to do was for the tires. That was SUPER nice and saved even more money. One day, an older Tahoe rear-ended me on the interstate while I was on my way to work. It totaled the car. I tried to replace it with another EV but by then, all of the Federal and State rebates were no longer available. The EV cars were just way too expensive. I could not justify paying $35K or more for an EV that had zero options. I ended up getting a gas-powered vehicle, brand new, fully loaded with all the options for $22k. I did the math and even calculated what it would be with really high gas prices - it was still cheaper to go with the gas vehicle than the EV. I still miss the Leaf. It was so much fun to drive! But I won't be going back until the prices drop or they introduce new incentives.
Love, love, love, love, love the attitude you had in that impromptu time with God. That's a good reminder to me to slow down a bit and practice patience.
 
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