Betelgeuse Dimming

athenasius

Well-Known Member
They say it is a sign that it will go supernova. Once it does it will light up the sky with the brightness of a full moon.
Oh WOW that would be something to see! God is amazing! His creation is so complex and surprising and wonderful.

G and I are watching some eagles nesting and raising young right now, and I keep marvelling at how the little egg pops out the eaglet, who grows so incredibly fast. I watched another pair look at their new egg with intent concentration, almost like they were asking what to do next, but God designed them with an incredible set of instincts that operate whether they are in Florida (Southwest Florida Eagle cam), over in Big Bear Lake country high in the California mountains or over in Norway.

How on earth do people see that and NOT see our Creator at work?
 

SonSeeker

Well-Known Member
How on earth do people see that and NOT see our Creator at work?
Good question!
From the incredibly massive star Betelgeuse, to the tiniest atom, God is displaying His handiwork! And from a giant Redwood tree to the tiniest mustard seed, He is still displaying His handiwork. Yet by His own proclamation, WE are His greatest creation!
Oh, what an Awesome God we serve.
 

Endangered

Well-Known Member
Betelgeuse is a great example of God's handiwork. He actually gave us a time machine that let's us look backwards in time. This star is around 700 light years away which means what we see today actually happened 700 years ago.
I have been a big fan of star gazing and own a small scope. It fills me with awe every time I look thru the scope. God's universe is unimaginably huge and changing every second. God figured out how to put a universe together and created the laws that keep it together.
When check out time comes on this Earth I definitely want God on my side.
 

Círeth

Well-Known Member
Well isn't that fun! God's designs are beautiful and I love it that they are such a puzzle sometimes. Anyone know why Betelgeuse is dimmer?
I'm not an astrophysics professor and this is a very simplistic explanation that might be wrong in places but it's as I understand it. If I am wrong anywhere and someone knows the right info please feel free to correct me.

Betelgeuse is a red supergiant.

Main sequence (yellow or orange) stars, like our sun, have plenty of hydrogen that they are converting to helium by nuclear fusion. The heat produced by this process causes them to expand outwards while their dense cores and subsequent supermassive gravity cause them to collapse inwards. So long as these forces remain equal and the star has hydrogen to power it's fusion reaction it remains a yellow or orange main sequence star. However it's steadily decreasing it's mass as it consumes hydrogen to make helium. When it reaches the point where it's consumed all the hydrogen in its core it expands out until the nuclear forces and its gravity are balanced again, forming a red giant or red supergiant like Betelgeuse.

Red giants and supergiants still have hydrogen in their outer layers and continue nuclear fusion there until the hydrogen runs out. As that happens those layers fade away leaving behind the star's core which still retains some heat as the gravity converts the helium to carbon. This is a white dwarf star. They become a lot denser as they convert and they eventually cool and fade into black dwarfs which are basically star leftover superdense carbon collections that apparently don't do anything. Although I don't know. We've never found any black dwarfs, they're still theoretical. Maybe they become massive space diamonds under the weight and pressure of their own gravity? That would be awesome.

Anyhoo back ontopic. However, and I don't really get how this works, if a star is big enough, a red supergiant instead of simply losing its outer layers and becoming a white dwarf loses its outer layers and then the superdense core either explodes into a supernova or becomes a neutron star. I don't understand the mechanism that makes it explode and I don't understand neutron stars either. Maybe someone else can explain that?

What's happening to Betelgeuse now is that it's lost enough hydrogen for it to lose enough layers to dim visibily. Because of its size when it's used up all of its hydrogen it'll explode into a supernova or become a neutron star.
 

athenasius

Well-Known Member
I'm not an astrophysics professor and this is a very simplistic explanation that might be wrong in places but it's as I understand it. If I am wrong anywhere and someone knows the right info please feel free to correct me.

Betelgeuse is a red supergiant.

Main sequence (yellow or orange) stars, like our sun, have plenty of hydrogen that they are converting to helium by nuclear fusion. The heat produced by this process causes them to expand outwards while their dense cores and subsequent supermassive gravity cause them to collapse inwards. So long as these forces remain equal and the star has hydrogen to power it's fusion reaction it remains a yellow or orange main sequence star. However it's steadily decreasing it's mass as it consumes hydrogen to make helium. When it reaches the point where it's consumed all the hydrogen in its core it expands out until the nuclear forces and its gravity are balanced again, forming a red giant or red supergiant like Betelgeuse.

Red giants and supergiants still have hydrogen in their outer layers and continue nuclear fusion there until the hydrogen runs out. As that happens those layers fade away leaving behind the star's core which still retains some heat as the gravity converts the helium to carbon. This is a white dwarf star. They become a lot denser as they convert and they eventually cool and fade into black dwarfs which are basically star leftover superdense carbon collections that apparently don't do anything. Although I don't know. We've never found any black dwarfs, they're still theoretical. Maybe they become massive space diamonds under the weight and pressure of their own gravity? That would be awesome.

Anyhoo back ontopic. However, and I don't really get how this works, if a star is big enough, a red supergiant instead of simply losing its outer layers and becoming a white dwarf loses its outer layers and then the superdense core either explodes into a supernova or becomes a neutron star. I don't understand the mechanism that makes it explode and I don't understand neutron stars either. Maybe someone else can explain that?

What's happening to Betelgeuse now is that it's lost enough hydrogen for it to lose enough layers to dim visibily. Because of its size when it's used up all of its hydrogen it'll explode into a supernova or become a neutron star.
Thanks Cireth! What a wonderful description. Makes sense. I hope we can see the Supernova stage. That would be so amazing and awesome. God at work in His creation! I have no words to describe how I feel when I see this sort of thing. I hope we can explore and see such things up close in our glorified bodies.
 

ByGod'sGrace

Well-Known Member
Thanks Cireth! What a wonderful description. Makes sense. I hope we can see the Supernova stage. That would be so amazing and awesome. God at work in His creation! I have no words to describe how I feel when I see this sort of thing. I hope we can explore and see such things up close in our glorified bodies.
I want to be able to fly - I've had enough dreams of flying....the last time I was in an airplane and looking out the window, I imagined swirling through the clouds, flying with the birds, in my glorified body....
 

pixelpusher

Well-Known Member
Thanks Cireth! What a wonderful description. Makes sense. I hope we can see the Supernova stage. That would be so amazing and awesome. God at work in His creation! I have no words to describe how I feel when I see this sort of thing. I hope we can explore and see such things up close in our glorified bodies.
And we may soon have a much clearer vantage point to see it from!
 
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