Archaeologists find 2,700-year-old toilet in luxurious palace in Jerusalem

Reason & Hope

Well-Known Member
Did you read the article? Haha to your comment but this is what it said about the contents.

"At the time, such pits were also used as garbage cans,” Billig noted. “The vast majority of the vessels found were bowls. It could be that they were some kind of disposable dishes, but also that they were used as containers for aromatic oil and were put in the toilet to improve the smell. We hope that some further analysis on the residues will provide answers.”

In addition, the bones will offer information on dietary habits, while the examination of the soil could shed light on parasites and diseases among ancient Judeans."
My brother in law has a strange business. He digs up the ground where old outhouses used to be and finds all sorts of things, which he then cleans up and sells. These outhouse are usually 100 years okd, so all the smelly organic material is long gone. It's just dirt now.

He finds: medicine bottles, dolls, toys, plates and cups, etc. The bottles are made of blue glass (very valuable) or brown glass (also a hot seller). He creates art pieces out of the broken bits.
 

heisable2

Well-Known Member
My brother in law has a strange business. He digs up the ground where old outhouses used to be and finds all sorts of things, which he then cleans up and sells. These outhouse are usually 100 years okd, so all the smelly organic material is long gone. It's just dirt now.

He finds: medicine bottles, dolls, toys, plates and cups, etc. The bottles are made of blue glass (very valuable) or brown glass (also a hot seller). He creates art pieces out of the broken bits.
That is really amazing. I've always admired artists who make things out of nothing and sell them at sidewalk markets or flea markets.

In 1980 when My St. Helens blew its top, some industrious people collected the ash and made figurines and other things and sold them.
 
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